Noob-ish question about adjusting colour gain and offset

Discussion in 'Home Cinema Buying & Building' started by Sunchpunch, Mar 1, 2013.

  1. Sunchpunch

    Sunchpunch
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    Hi all,

    Just a quickie.

    Watched most of the calibration vids on this site and read the Dummie's guide. But still I have a simple question, is it possible to calibrate red, blue and green gain and offset without using a colour meter of some sort?

    Cheers
     
  2. scottthehat

    scottthehat
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    simple answer is no, to get it accurate you must use a meter and software, which can be had for about £100 up,
     
  3. Sunchpunch

    Sunchpunch
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    Thank you - figured as much, have read a lot, but just needed to know if I would fall at the first hurdle without a calibration meter of some sort. So i assume something like the spyder 2 would be up for the job?
     
  4. KelvinS1965

    KelvinS1965
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    I'll probably get flamed for this and the intention isn't to put you off, however IMVHO a cheap meter is almost worse than no meter at all.

    I recently upgraded from an i1 display LT (sometimes known as the 'D2') and compared the readings it took against the i1 display Pro Enhanced sensor that I replaced it with. There was a 12dE difference in the greyscale. :eek: Now to be fair much of that could have been due to drift since the LT is effected by moisture which gradually causes the readings to drift. I did keep it in a bag with silica gel and in a dry drawer but even so that's a huge difference. I did rent an i1 Pro a couple of years back and even then there was quite a difference between the two readings, so I suspect it was never that good to start with.

    Likewise the Spyder sensors are probably fine in terms of learning, but they may give you similar errors to my old LT. It should go without saying that I don't think a secondhand colourimeter is worth buying for similar reasons, though a specrometer could be a good choice if you found one (such as the i1 Pro that I rented).

    As I said, I didn't want to put you off, but I think you need to be realistic about how accurate the cheaper models might be.
     
  5. Visca Blaugrana

    Visca Blaugrana
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    Can only agree with the above. However that don't mean "dont do it" more like be prepared it will cost you more in the future.

    from my point of view: do you like tinkering, go ahead and by the best meter you can afford and use hcfr. Are you doing this to save some cash compared to a prof calibration, don't bother.
    it take time and cost money, but its also great fun if you like such things.
     
  6. Sunchpunch

    Sunchpunch
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    Yeah I figured the cheaper ones, may not be as accurate - stands to reason I guess.

    you say you 'rented' one?
     
  7. scottthehat

    scottthehat
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    it depends on what software you use if you buy a cheaper meter with the like of chrompure you cn get them refrenced but it does cost more.
     
  8. KelvinS1965

    KelvinS1965
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    The reason it costs more is that to reference the cheaper sensor, you need another accurate sensor such as an i1 Pro or other spectrometer. ;) This is only valid for the display type that you 'profile' it against (plasma, LCD, front projector, etc) so would need redoing each time you want to change the display type you want to calibrate. Therefore you'd need an i1 Pro (or similar) of your own to do this.

    You can buy the more accurate i1 display Pro (not the same as the i1 Pro mentioned above ;) ) in an 'enhanced' version (the one I have) which has the corrections store in it's licence file so it can be used accurately for different display types, just by selecting which correction to use from a pull down menu when first selecting the sensor to use in Chromapure.
     

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