Non-linear minidisc-style editing?

Discussion in 'Blu-ray & DVD Players & Recorders' started by dvdud, Oct 31, 2004.

  1. dvdud

    dvdud
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    Hi. After reading a post on the Panny E75 and thinking this might be (another) machine to consider :boring: , i took a brief look at the specs on this machine and read "Non-linear minidisc-style editing". I do want to be able to transfer bits n pieces from loadsa vhs vids and wondered what i could do via this machine? Frame accuracy is not too important but would i be able to rearrange clips afterwards, or is that where the Hdd comes into its own? Thanks for any replies
     
  2. OARDVD

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    With Panasonic recorders you can resequence scenes on DVD RAM using playlists. However, RAM is not compatible with most DVD players so if you want to archive a playlist to DVD-R you’d need to play the output from the E75 to another recorder. However, alternatively, you could get one of its big brothers with an integrated HDD (E85/95/500). With these machines you can arrange the playlist on the HDD, and then losslessly high speed dub it to DVD-R (or RAM). So yes, it’s one of the many areas where the HDD comes into its own. However note that these machines don’t currently offer an integrated VHS capability.
     
  3. dvdud

    dvdud
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    Thanks for the reply. Not 100% sure i've taken on board what you've said but your quote "...RAM is not compatible with most DVD players so if you want to archive a playlist to DVD-R you’d need to play the output from the E75 to another recorder..."seems to be saying its a 2 recorder job so the HDD is definitely the way to go.
     
  4. Rob20

    Rob20
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    Personally I wouldn't buy a dvd recorder without a HDD. It's essential mainly for the editing possibilities it provides. You can edit with ram disks, but they aren't compatible with most players. As for rw disks and VR mode etc., again most dvd players won't play a rw disk in vr mode. I have a Pan 85 which can be picked up for around £400. Record 36 hours of SD pictures (easily good enough for digital tv with pictures nigh on identical to the source) then transfer to dvd -r disks. These will then play in any machine once finalised. Why bother with dvd-rw or dvd ram when blank dvd -r disks can be bought for as little as 20p!

    About the same cost (probably less depending on brand) as 1 cigarette to put it into perspective. :)
     
  5. OARDVD

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    Some of the advantages of a DVD recorder with an HDD, off the top of my head. (This assumes that the HDD has VR mode):

    1) Good editing (HDD) combined with great compatibility (DVD-R).
    2) Optimum picture quality on the DVD (since the editing is done on the HDD, all the space of the DVD is used).
    3) If you require multiple copies (or if the dub to DVD-R fails) you’ve already got the edited recording/playlist on the HDD, ready to go again.
    4) The large size of the HDD means that you can record a large number of programmes (especially useful when you go away on holiday). Only copy to DVD the ones you want to keep.
    5) The ability to record on HDD while playing a DVD (or vice versa).

    I would recommend that you buy an HDD unit that offers:

    1) A Flexible Recording mode (or manual flexible settings) on the HDD and the DVD.
    2) A split utility on the HDD.
    3) The ability to re-encode (ie real-time dub) from HDD to DVD.
     
  6. Mar©

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    Can any of the Panny's do that ?
     
  7. dvdud

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    thanks again for the input. OARDVD; you recommend 1) A Flexible Recording mode (or manual flexible settings) on the HDD and the DVD.
    2) A split utility on the HDD.

    If its not too much troub, can you offer a simple explanation as well as the merits on these two points?
     
  8. OARDVD

    OARDVD
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    Yes, but so can the Toshiba XS-32 & the Pioneer recorders.
     
  9. OARDVD

    OARDVD
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    Panasonic’s Flexible Recording (FR) mode allows the machine to automatically set the bit rate (ie. recording quality) on the DVD so that it’s optimised to fill the disc. FR can also be set for recording to the HDD where it will reserve about 4.7GB of the space on the hard disc & treat it like a virtual DVD. This is useful if you want to do a small amount of editing on the HDD and then High Speed dub to DVD. HS dubbing copies the video programme (or file) across to the DVD completely unchanged, so it’s useful to have it recorded on the HDD at an appropriate bit rate to fill the DVD and optimise space/quality.

    Other manufacturer’s flexible recording modes work by allowing you to manually set a recording quality yourself (from 32 or so steps). This allows you to make an adjustment for situations where you need to delete a larger proportion of the programme (and yet still fill the DVD). In contrast, with the Panasonic machines, FR mode does not fill the disc if you delete a large amount.

    Good machines will allow you to record using flexible recording modes in three ways. IE. During:

    1) Timer mode
    2) Re-encoding from the HDD to the DVD
    3) Manual recording (you key in the running time of the programme and it starts recording at the appropriate quality).

    This is simply where there’s an editing option to allow you to split a recording into separate sections. Some recorders allow you to physically split (which changes the original) and others will do it by playlist (where the original is unchanged). Some can do it both ways. It’s useful if you’ve recorded several programmes in one recording and you want to split them in to several titles on their own. It’s also useful if you want to record at the highest quality (1 hour mode) and the resulting programme won’t fit on one DVD. So, you can split it across several DVDs.

    If you look back on this board over the last few weeks I think you'll find several posts on both of the above, with various machine's abilities.
     
  10. dvdud

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    Thanks for the explanation. It'll need reading a number of times but i'm sure eventually the fog will clear ;-)
     
  11. OARDVD

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    I’ll try to explain Flexible Recording more simply. ‘Standard’ recording modes on DVD recorders automatically set the recording quality such that a particular mode will fit a given number of hours on to a 4.7GB DVD. Typically you get XP (1hour), SP (2 hours), LP (4 hours), etc. However, the actual standard modes you get will vary with the manufacturer.

    Now let’s take SP as an example. This mode allows you to record a maximum of 2 hours on to a DVD. But, the chances are, your required recording duration will not be exactly 2 hours (it could be more, it could be less). For arguments sake, say you want to record for only 1 hour 30 mins. That means that at SP the recording would occupy only ¾ of the DVD, so effectively ¼ would be wasted. Flexible Recording is a mode which will adjust the recording quality to fit the DVD. So in our example, using FR, the quality of a 1 hour 30 min recording will be increased such that it will use all of the space on a DVD.
     
  12. dvdud

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    Thanks for that. Didn't expect the further 'break-down' but most welcome....and u.stood.
     

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