No terrestrial rival to SkyHD

Discussion in 'Sky Digital TV Forum' started by sanderton, Dec 20, 2006.

  1. sanderton

    sanderton
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    So OFCOM have declines to allocate terrestraial spectrum for Freeview HD. There's no way the BBC will be able to pay for the bandwidth at open auction. So Sky get to keep a virtual monopoly on HD.

    That sound you hear in the background on Sky one HD is James Murdoch dancing a jig...
     
  2. infinite_loop

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    oh dear. Well done, the government. Dish-refusers should be writing to their MPs immediately.
     
  3. Starburst

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    If HD is going to be as important and profitable as SKY believe then surely there are broadcasters in the UK that can see it as being a major product on the DTT network and invest accordingly, after all by 2012 we'll know one way or another. Lets face it if buying a new mux isn't affordable for HD then it isn't going to make money for SD channels, finite advertising revenues will only go so far unless of course we are talking about new PAY muxes.
    The problem would be is who has the right to multi-million pound capacity offered, why should anyone be given something worth potential Billions to the treasury. It may be justifable for the BBC under their charter but certainly ITV,CH4 and Five have no right above anyother commercial broadcaster to favoured status.
    If SKY had to pay £500 million for a mux (not a daft figure given CH4 paid £10mill for a time limited slot on single mux earlier this year) then that automatically screws them when compared to another broadcaster who get's it for nothing

    Either way I am sure many would welcome more mobile communications based options using this new spectrum, it's mildly amusing that people seem prepared to pay similar prices (far more insome cases) for mobile services as for SKY/Cable yet don't seem to question them as much:)
     
  4. chrise

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    The Times have an article on the Ofcom decison here interesting comment that after the switch off there will still be room for 10 SD or 3 HD channels in the existing spectrum - any bets on another 10 shopping/quiz channels then?.

    Personally I am not surprised, satellite and cable are the logical carriers for broadcast HD as bandwidth is cheaper and more plentiful. In theory you could have a HD Freesat service but I suspect that won't happen. HD will unfortunately stay a premium product in the UK for many years.
     
  5. Starburst

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    You would hope that the upcoming BBC/ITV Freesat proposal will either be HD compatible from the start or at least have an upgrade path built in.
    Any FTA HD offering for the UK must begin on satellite, cost, coverage and little timescale are three great reasons to make the offering.
     
  6. chrism_scotland

    chrism_scotland
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    I read about this in the Times today, I hope this won't affect BBC HD hopefully being maintained beyond the trial period,
    The problem is that beyond Sky none of the UK broadcasters have the money to win an auction for the bandwidth.
    The mobile telecom networks, O2, 3, T-Mobile, etc will likely have the cash to buy the spectrum available, who the hell wants to watch TV on their mobile over free to air HD Channels?
    In my experience mobile phone TV is mince so far, I'd rather have some Freeview HD but I fear our cash strapped broadcasters will not be able to win any of it.

    Perhaps we need a new independent broadcaster in the UK to buy this spectrum available and produce free HD programming.
     
  7. Starburst

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    Yes for all the profits PAY and advert driven broadcasters make they are dwarfed by the existing and potential revenues from mobile communications.

    Given the two products (HD and Mobile telly) I have no doubt that the mobile option would be the immediate front runner, more people know about the potential than HD at this point and I expect with the rapid turn around of moble technology it will gain market penetration (used or not) that HD could only dream about.
     
  8. Starburst

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    The simple solution is for the government to allocate a single new national DTT mux for FTA HD broadcasting, give one slot to the BBC and offer the other two (3 channels using mpeg4 being a good balance) to anyother UK broadcaster that can offer a reasonably balanced HD lineup.
    If SKY want a slot then they have to offer something way beyond what they have before (unlikely really) leaving the way open for ITV, CH4 or Five who by 2012 should with foresight be fully HD capable.

    Of course the state loses some revenues but they don't need to auction off all unused capacity to recoup analogue revenues and make a nice profit, public services should have a place and I can't believe I just said that:)
     
  9. chrise

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    There will be room in the section of the spectrum not being sold for 3 HD channels which I assume is one multiplex. It all depends if ITV and Channel 4 think it a worthwhile investment - as they have not put anything up on Satellite yet that is no means certain.

    BBC seems commited by having made the investment in equipment etc but as the technically they are still transmitting a "trial" service they could back away but that is probably unlikely.
     
  10. simon194

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    As far as I'm aware you can only fit one HD channel into the 8Mhz bandwidth available which is probably why Ofcom aren't too keen on having HDTV broadcast terrestrially.
     
  11. Starburst

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    Yeah but we are talking 2012 for full national DTT coverage, while I suppose there could be limited regional sell offs the big money is for national coverage.
    If ITV,Ch4 and Five are not convinced by HD by then they never will be:)
     

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