No line of sight south east

andytoknow

Standard Member
Hiya,

Am I the only person in the UK who has no line of sight to the south-east? (There is a large woody hill behind the house) I am looking to find a satellite solution to improve tv reception. Are there any satellite services which are not south-east?

Any advice hugely appreciated?

Thanks


Andy
 
C

cyprusstudio

Guest
Do a check on www.dishpointer.com thenwhen you know which directions are clear you will have an idea of what can be received, if any.
All receivable satellites will be to the south, within 30 or so degrees either side, especially if you have so many trees.
Chris
 

logiciel

Moderator
Hi Andy and welcome to the forum.
If you really have no line of sight then you don't get any reception, and there's nothing to improve.
It's unlikely though and dishpointer will tell you for sure - select 28E for the satellites and zoom in on your location.
That will show you how close and how high obstacles have to be, to block the line.
 

winston2010

Well-known Member
Hiya,

Am I the only person in the UK who has no line of sight to the south-east? (There is a large woody hill behind the house) I am looking to find a satellite solution to improve tv reception. Are there any satellite services which are not south-east?

Any advice hugely appreciated?

Thanks


Andy

No, there are plenty of people in London and other cities with tower blocks in the way.

There are satellite services in the south west, e.g Eutelsat 5 at 5west. French speaking channels however.
 

andytoknow

Standard Member
Hi everyone,

Thanks all so much for your replies. Unfortunately, yes it is a very steep hill, very close to the house. I see there are some southwest satellites and even northerly like the Intelsat ones, but what I was hoping for is one that I can get BBC, ITV, C4 etc from?

As Winston says, there are plenty of people in cities with tower blocks and stuff in the way, what do they do.

(Oh and the other catch is because I am rural no decent broadband either, so online services not an option)

Another lovely sunny day today :)

Thanks again.


Andy
 

davemurgatroyd2

Distinguished Member
Hi everyone,

Thanks all so much for your replies. Unfortunately, yes it is a very steep hill, very close to the house. I see there are some southwest satellites and even northerly like the Intelsat ones, but what I was hoping for is one that I can get BBC, ITV, C4 etc from?

As Winston says, there are plenty of people in cities with tower blocks and stuff in the way, what do they do.

(Oh and the other catch is because I am rural no decent broadband either, so online services not an option)

Another lovely sunny day today :)

Thanks again.


Andy

There are no "northerly" satellites (unless you are in the southern hemisphere) - all the broadcast satellites are in geo-stationary orbit above the equator so are in an arc from west to east in a southerly direction.
 

logiciel

Moderator
one that I can get BBC, ITV, C4 etc from
They are on the group of satellites at 28 degrees east, not on any others.
We've given you the details of how to check at dishpointer about the hill - let us know the results.
 

the_gavnor

Active Member
I know its an expensive idea but with fibre you can locate the dish upto 10km from the house with the same lose you will see from 80m of WF100. So if you have some land, all might not be lost!
 

grahamlthompson

In memoriam
Hi everyone,

Thanks all so much for your replies. Unfortunately, yes it is a very steep hill, very close to the house. I see there are some southwest satellites and even northerly like the Intelsat ones, but what I was hoping for is one that I can get BBC, ITV, C4 etc from?

As Winston says, there are plenty of people in cities with tower blocks and stuff in the way, what do they do.

(Oh and the other catch is because I am rural no decent broadband either, so online services not an option)

Another lovely sunny day today :)

Thanks again.


Andy

The average roof is pretty close to the elevation of 28.2E. If you stand looking roughly SSE and look up the roof line can you see sky or the hill ?
 

Rodders53

Distinguished Member
No you are not alone. I've visited quite a few places where the l.o.s to the UK satellite cluster is obscured.

One such place, in a small wooded valley, the guy living there knew he could see the satellite from the other side of the road... but getting permission to dig it up to run a cable across was out of the question. Although quite close to London, TV reception was also very difficult {measured field strength marked the cluster of houses as officially 'unserved'} -- his best was from Rowridge. {This was in analogue days, although, iirc, the BBC had just appeared on DSat}.

If satellite is definitely obscured perhaps we should think more about your terrestrial TV reception issues and how to improve that... to do that full justice we may need to have the thread moved by the moderators over to Freeview?
 

logiciel

Moderator
A new thread in FV would be perfectly acceptable.;)
 

andytoknow

Standard Member
Goodness me, everyone is being so helpful. thank you all so much. So from what I understand, the only satellites for UK TV are SE. In which case I think we may be stuck on that one. The hill is tall and the trees mature! I have attached a snapshot from dishpointer (which I think I have done right) and which I think will show the problem a little more clearly.

http://www.touchcloud.co.uk/Newsletter/dishpointer_snapshot.jpg

As always many thanks
 

grahamlthompson

In memoriam
Stick a piece of tube (toilet roll will do) on protractor at 24 degrees . Point it in the right direction and squint through the tube from the proposed dish location. If you can see sky you are in with a chance. If the hill or trees - sorree. :thumbsdow
 

logiciel

Moderator
That's OK and thanks for the illustration.
Yes, the UK channels are on that satellite group, at 28 degrees east, and if you're in a house in the middle of all those trees then if there's one in line of sight 100 feet away then the top of it has to be 50 feet higher than the height of your dish, before it blocks the line - and if you're looking through the roll go up to the height of the dish.
 
C

cyprusstudio

Guest
Satellite Director is a free App for an Android Smartphone.
It uses your camera, and places a marker on the screen, so you can see which satellites are receivable.
 

iaint

Active Member
Hi.
Looks like quite a large property; and there's nothing to say a sat dish has to be bolted to the house. If there's something else, say a garage or even a tree within ~60m or so of where your TV, it's worth considering...
--
Regards, Iain.
 

braychurchmouse

Standard Member
Some folks near us live on the wrong side of a railway embankment and they have long scaffold poles with a dish at the top. You may have to tether the pole with three or more wire ropes to stop it swinging in the wind. You may need a professional installer though as adjusting the azimuth and elevation could be a bit tricky. In working out the required hight allow for a few year's growth of any trees otherwise you'll be forever trimming them!
 

MartinPickering

Well-known Member
getting permission to dig it up to run a cable across was out of the question

Hahaha! Here the farmers routinely cut a channel through the tarmac to lay a water pipe. Nobody questions it. Sometimes they hammer in steel pins and bend them over to secure the pipe. The pins rip tyres to shreds. :smashin:

Andy, can you mount your dish in the field border as close to your house as possible? If the cable run is less than 100m, an 80cm dish will do. Stick it next to the bushes or screw it to the trunk of a tree. Paint it to match the surroundings.
 

REPASSAC

Well-known Member
.........
Thanks all so much for your replies. Unfortunately, yes it is a very steep hill, very close to the house. I see there are some southwest satellites and even northerly like the Intelsat ones, but what I was hoping for is one that I can get BBC, ITV, C4 etc from?
............................Andy
An elevation of 25 degrees that a LNB needs to 28.2E is steep.
 

Vin Blanc

Active Member
Hi Andy (2no),

I took the liberty of taking a look at your location in “Google Earth” to try and get a better understanding of your problem.

Using “Street view” I was able to see the view from the road outside your property, (assuming that it is your property that I am looking at?).

I noticed that just a short way inside the entrance (to the right), there stands a very tall Pine tree or Scots fir or whatever, (the sort of tree that they turn into telegraph poles).

With a few branches lopped off in the right place this would make an excellent mount for a sat dish, ideally about 15 to 20 feet up.

Don’t forget that the required elevation necessary from your location is 24.3º which is quite steep when you look at it drawn on a sheet of foolscap paper.

Also remember that an “Off-set” dish doesn’t point directly at the satellite, (See attachment below).

Obviously, I can’t determine from here just how much co-ax you would need but from what I am able to see on Google I think you may just be in with a chance by mounting the dish further back from the hill towards the road!

Let us know if this seems feasible.

Vin Blanc
 

Attachments

  • Dish with Inclinometer.JPG
    Dish with Inclinometer.JPG
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