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no gold scart sockets?

Discussion in 'Cables & Switches' started by stuartsjg, Nov 15, 2004.

  1. stuartsjg

    stuartsjg
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    The idea behind gold connectors is to help improve siganl transfer by cutting down on surface oxidation. This is a well proven thing.

    I am curious, why dont you get gold plated scart sockets?

    I was looking allong the back of a row of Plasmas and LCD's and couldnt find ANY with gold on the Scart sockets. Plenty had it on the component etc.... one even on the RF input!! but no gold scarts.

    No, having some chemical understanding, 2 diffirent metals have diffirent places in the electrochemical series. (basically, whats the voltage you can produce with 2 diffirent metals) Diffirecnes result in a voltage. A voltage can over a very long time case corrosion due to a net flow of electrons and something else.

    Whats the point of gold scart if no gold socket? (i know losses are cumulative, but still)

    I can even find a company that makes them. I think you can get them plated but thaat would be expensive.

    Any thoughs? :)
     
  2. eviljohn2

    eviljohn2
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    My Toshiba sd420e DVD player has a gold plated scart socket although I'm not using it at the moment.

    As far as thoughts go, I think you're right. Using what little I know of physics and chemistry I gather that it's most sensible to use the connector type that matches those on the equipment. Gold does have the benefit of being softer though, so it may be possible to make a better connection if the socket is tight enough.
     
  3. Nick_UK

    Nick_UK
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    The point of using a thin layer of gold on the connector ensures that the seller can extract more cash from you :laugh:

    The very thin layer of gold will wear off very quickly (gold is a very soft metal), and you'll be down to base metal. Many professional connectors are rated with the number of plugs/unplugs that the connector will stand before the plating is worn off. In addition, the socket part of the SCART is designed to scratch the surface of the pins, which accelerates wear even further.

    I have been using SCART connectors since their inception, and have seen very few that have given problems due to oxidation of the contacts.
     
  4. stuartsjg

    stuartsjg
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    I havent seen oxidation either. Also many professional connectors arnt gold plated, its just standard nickel or silver.

    I see what you mean about more cash - its not the metal being more conductive, its that because its so soft, the 2 surfaces can form to eachother and to ensure good contact, as said above by john.

    I sometimes wonder if equiptment manufacturers have the theory that whilst the internal connections and wiring arnt OFC, arnt gold plated etc. theres no point in having gold on the input or output pins for scarts, even phono and BNC.
     
  5. Londondecca

    Londondecca
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    It is the publics perception that gold plated is better. Silver would be ideal but I doubt many would pay the health premium.
     
  6. mjn

    mjn
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    none of my scarts have gold plated connectors.....all silver.....the "gold plated sockets are better" is just a myth!
     
  7. Nick_UK

    Nick_UK
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    I'm glad someone agrees. If these plugs were taking lots of current, there might be a reason for it, but they are not. A few extra ohms resistance won't make a jot of difference.
     
  8. bobbypunk

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    I think the general idea behind trying to make a difference is purely because alot of small differences add up to the possibility of a noticable improvement.
    I don't know how I could test this one as all the decent scarts i've ever used have been gold plated anyway. The only thing I can say is that I agree that on it's own I couldn't tell the difference, tested a cheapy gold plated against a standard. (All tests with scarts i've ever done were fair tests and most were blind tests.)
     
  9. eviljohn2

    eviljohn2
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    Silver is definitely the metal of choice when it comes to conductivity :)
     
  10. Nick_UK

    Nick_UK
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    Silver is good, but it corrodes easily. Aluminium is a good conductor which is also resistant to corrosion, which is probably why it is used in a good many SCART plugs.
     
  11. Peridot

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    Since when? Aluminum oxidises very readily, and it'd be fun trying to solder to in a SCART connector :laugh:

    _______________________________
     
  12. Nick_UK

    Nick_UK
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    Aluminium is a generic name for a whole range of alloys. There are lots of aluminium alloys which have good electrical properties and are resistant to corrosion, that's why they are used on overhead power lines (they have a steel core for mechanical strength). There is no need to solder a plug with crimp connections.
     
  13. eviljohn2

    eviljohn2
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    That's just not true. The name aluminium refers only to the element with atomic number 13. Alloys will all have their own name. :)
     
  14. bobbypunk

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    chemistry as well as physics!
    He's right aswell, this is the case with all elements they are the "pure" forms.
     
  15. Nick_UK

    Nick_UK
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    So if I go to a builder's merchants and ask for an aluminium ladder, they will only sell me a pure aluminium one ?

    I sincerely hope not - since a ladder made from pure aluminium wouldn't last 5 minutes :laugh:

    Yes, aluminium is the metal with the atomic number of 13, but it is also the generic name applied to a large number of alloys.
     
  16. stebbo

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    The use of gold goes back to electro-mechanical switching in telephony. By one estimate of a Bell Labs materials scientist in 1970 a long distance call from New Jersey to California might have been made through 10,000 metal-to-metal connections (including air-exposed copper petals and leafs over Cross-Bar and Step-by-Step switching and Plug-In circuit cards.

    If each of those connections had 99% reliability if one started making attemptson the network at 12:00:01 on New Year's Eve he might connect1 or 2 calls in a years' time.

    Depositing a small amount of Gold on the contacts area improved reliability of each individual contacts to 6-Nines and improved system reliability to 99% or better.

    But for connections that don't involve metal-to-metal repeated cyclical contacts this level of reliability isn't an issue.

    For typical audio/video interconnection gold-plated contacts aren't typically needed. But they do look nice! :lesson:
     

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