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NEWS: Samsung to launch Micro LED TVs using Chinese LEDs

SteveeJ

Well-known Member
Looking to commodotise new technology from so early? Bold move. If they can successfully manufacture I’d assume Samsung have deal in place to keep LG locked out.
 

Loopthrough

Well-known Member
In 10-15 years Samsung TVs will be in the position Panasonic are now, and the Chinese will be the premium brands, just like happened with British to Japanese to Korean brands.

Samsung is already using BOE (Beijing Opto Electronics) LCD panels in their most mainstream TVs in 2016-18, presumably because their own panel business can't compete.
 

stevebk

Well-known Member
Well done to Samsung, great to hear Micro LED coming to the market.
It will be very interesting to see how it compares to Oled.
 

Furnace Inferno

Well-known Member
Well done to Samsung, great to hear Micro LED coming to the market.
It will be very interesting to see how it compares to Oled.
Theoretically it should be better in every way, now whether the first model is or not we shall see.

I wonder if they are going straight for big production numbers to keep the cost lower than the first OLEDs and have them more in line with current high end prices, that would kill OLED in it's tracks and consign them to mid-range TV's with LCD's staying as the budget and smaller sizes.

The real question is what on earth will they call it now they've already used various forms of "LED" to market LCD's with LED backlights. They can hardly come out and admit that actually it was all just marketing lies and now please buy the real deal.
 

Blu-rayx

Well-known Member
The real question is what on earth will they call it now they've already used various forms of "LED" to market LCD's with LED backlights. They can hardly come out and admit that actually it was all just marketing lies and now please buy the real deal.
QLED PLUS :rotfl:
 

MikeTVMikeTV

Well-known Member
Will be avoiding these then, if it's anything like the cheap Chinese capacitors they used in their TVs from 2010 - 2013 ish, instead of the more expensive Japanese ones that actually lasted and didn't blow up.
 

The_Wierd

Well-known Member
The real question is what on earth will they call it now they've already used various forms of "LED" to market LCD's with LED backlights. They can hardly come out and admit that actually it was all just marketing lies and now please buy the real deal.
Even more confusingly, if I understand correctly, there are two possibilities for micro-LED - true 'per pixel' colour LEDs and micro-LED as a high resolution local-dimming backlight for an LCD panel. Potential for consumer confusion, (or willful misdirection) is huge!
 

Captain Ron

Well-known Member
2600 SuperQdimming zones then.
 

Cameron583

Well-known Member
MLED - I'm calling it.

Or uLED
 

laser

Active Member
Even more confusingly, if I understand correctly, there are two possibilities for micro-LED - true 'per pixel' colour LEDs and micro-LED as a high resolution local-dimming backlight for an LCD panel. Potential for consumer confusion, (or willful misdirection) is huge!
I thought thought the whole point of Micro LED was a LED for each pixel.

The report states that a 4k panel may use 2600 micro leds, thus it sounds like a normal LCD with more local dimming zones.

With 2600 micro LEDs, it will be better than present LED LCD TVs but still not able to match OLEDS pixel by pixel control of the picture.

Time will tell
 

Base13

Active Member
Even more confusingly, if I understand correctly, there are two possibilities for micro-LED - true 'per pixel' colour LEDs and micro-LED as a high resolution local-dimming backlight for an LCD panel. Potential for consumer confusion, (or willful misdirection) is huge!
Unfortunately it looks like the second option here as the report mentioned 2,600 in the report. Per pixel would be a much higher number.

EDIT: beat to it while typing.
 

AlanX

Active Member
If this is just "2600 LEDs", then I agree this is very disappointing. On a 65" screen, these would be about 2cm square! A true uLED screen would require a minimum of 3 LEDs per pixel, so around 25 million. This is about 10,000 times the 2,600 quoted.
So I'm wondering if each "LED chip" carries multiple LEDs (possibly 10,000), and panels are made up of multiples of these. Pure speculation, of course.
 

invisiblekid

Distinguished Member
Even more confusingly, if I understand correctly, there are two possibilities for micro-LED - true 'per pixel' colour LEDs and micro-LED as a high resolution local-dimming backlight for an LCD panel. Potential for consumer confusion, (or willful misdirection) is huge!
It's Samsung TV, willful misdirection is built into every TV.


Also £12m? That doesn't seem much of a commitment. That figure seems more like they are trying to see if the Chinese are any good at them.
 

Joe C

Well-known Member
Sounds like the usual Samsung schpiel - promise brilliance, deliver mediocrity
 

stevebk

Well-known Member
And there was me hoping for something to compete with Oled, not so sure that's the case now..
 

AlanX

Active Member
Further to my note above, speculating around 10,000 LEDs per LED chip, I've just found the following in:
An introduction to MicroLED; a new self-emitting display technology - FlatpanelsHD

"MicroLEDs are extremely small, typically 1/10th the width of a human hair, which makes it possible to deposit them as a pixel array onto a substrate to make a display."

I'd say it's quite likely that Samsung are talking about a matrix of 2600 LED "arrays" rather than 2600 LEDs. Only that would make any sense to me. If that's true, then they are talking about the real thing.
 

golden phoenix

Distinguished Member
they might be sorting trade agreements, but nothing about when MLED is coming to the commercial market could be years away
 
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Captain Ron

Well-known Member
Further to my note above, speculating around 10,000 LEDs per LED chip, I've just found the following in:
An introduction to MicroLED; a new self-emitting display technology - FlatpanelsHD

"MicroLEDs are extremely small, typically 1/10th the width of a human hair, which makes it possible to deposit them as a pixel array onto a substrate to make a display."

I'd say it's quite likely that Samsung are talking about a matrix of 2600 LED "arrays" rather than 2600 LEDs. Only that would make any sense to me. If that's true, then they are talking about the real thing.
If this is indeed the case then this goes straight back to being an interesting technology again. Whatever happened to Sony's crystal LED I wonder. I've also thought why not resurrect back projection but instead of actually projecting onto a screen instead use an optical pathway array to deliver laser illumination from a central source directly to the pixel panels.
 

Vertigo1

Active Member
I thought thought the whole point of Micro LED was a LED for each pixel.

The report states that a 4k panel may use 2600 micro leds, thus it sounds like a normal LCD with more local dimming zones.

With 2600 micro LEDs, it will be better than present LED LCD TVs but still not able to match OLEDS pixel by pixel control of the picture.

Time will tell
It only has to get close. If it can provide 95% of the black performance of OLED via 2600 local dimming 'zones' then that'll be enough for the vast majority of consumers.

OLED's only advantages are black performance and wider viewing angles. As soon as LCD tech gets within a few percent of the black performance, OLED's days are numbered.
 

Blu-rayx

Well-known Member
It only has to get close. If it can provide 95% of the black performance of OLED via 2600 local dimming 'zones' then that'll be enough for the vast majority of consumers.

OLED's only advantages are black performance and wider viewing angles. As soon as LCD tech gets within a few percent of the black performance, OLED's days are numbered.
OLED's advantages: Black performance and wider viewing angles, I take that any day over an LCD :)
 

tman

Well-known Member
OLED is almost like a stop-gap technology. The LED/LCD market was getting over saturated, so LG wanted something to seperate themselves from it. Sure, it's been moderately successful for them, especially once other manufacturers joined in, but LG have had to spend hundreds of millions to develop the technology, and they've likely not made much actual money from it. but let's be realistic, OLED in its current form is reaching the limit of it's capability. Will OLED ever get >1000 nits brightness, or can it be shrunk to work at 8k? Maybe Samsung were onto something when they decided not to join the OLED party. I'd say MicroLED, once it reaches mass market and is cheaper than OLED but without any of it's limitations will probably kill it.
 

Vertigo1

Active Member
OLED's advantages: Black performance and wider viewing angles, I take that any day over an LCD :)
Horses for courses. Viewing angles are irrelevant to me and I'll take 90% of the black performance in exchange for no issues with banding, near-black performance, image retention or limited brightness thanks very much.
 

laser

Active Member
OLED is almost like a stop-gap technology. The LED/LCD market was getting over saturated, so LG wanted something to seperate themselves from it. Sure, it's been moderately successful for them, especially once other manufacturers joined in, but LG have had to spend hundreds of millions to develop the technology, and they've likely not made much actual money from it. but let's be realistic, OLED in its current form is reaching the limit of it's capability. Will OLED ever get >1000 nits brightness, or can it be shrunk to work at 8k? Maybe Samsung were onto something when they decided not to join the OLED party. I'd say MicroLED, once it reaches mass market and is cheaper than OLED but without any of it's limitations will probably kill it.
OLED has been hugely successful for LG Display.

Bare in mind it's not just panels for TVs. Oled screens go into all Samsung high end mobile phones and LG Display also supply Apple for their iPhones.

It's likely that mobile phone oled screens probably make more profit for LG Display.

Even if oled is a stop gap technology, LG are likely to have the premium tv sales wrapped up for the next 4 to 5 years and production costs will reduce over that time.

However, you just need to look at plasma, it disappeared very quickly. Although the inability to move to 4K, heavier power requirements and limited sales compared to LED , ultimately lead to a quick demise.

The TV industry is very fickle.

Who knows what the next 10 years will bring.
 

Blu-rayx

Well-known Member
Horses for courses. Viewing angles are irrelevant to me and I'll take 90% of the black performance in exchange for no issues with banding, near-black performance, image retention or limited brightness thanks very much.
Just as long you are happy but an LCD would be Would be useless in my environment(chocolate fireguard ) :D

LCD: clouding, blooming and uneven black would drive me nuts :rotfl:

At the end of the day, there will never be the perfect TV
 
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