NEWS: QD-OLED gets official $10.8 billion commitment from Samsung Display

Livemo

Active Member
Its years away from mass production. The wall will continue to be available as luxury item, via samsung electronics
 

EndlessWaves

Distinguished Member
Micro ..the WALL LED ??
The quantum dot colour filters/converters can be used on any technology. They're as applicable to LCD and LED as they are to OLED.

They're interesting because they convert light rather than block it. So not only do they bypass the need to improve colour filter tech to expand the colour gamut, you also get a big boost in efficiency because your backlight only has to provide a third of the light.
 

richardsim7

Distinguished Member
Shame they tainted the QLED branding, that would have been quite effective for QD-OLED, and far less misleading
 

MEGATAMA

Active Member
So in the end thy are killin LCD,i hope thy will have luck with tech because LG NEEDs competition.
Lets see what will be with burn in on their oled displays....
 

aoaaron

Well-known Member
... is this YEARs away or a year away?

im getting the feeling years.

TBH This move has come and its good its come but its so god damn late.
 

raymondo77

Distinguished Member
I’d be surprised if these were in actual TVs, available to buy, before the end of 2021.

By which time I’ll be ready (and may have saved enough money) to upgrade from my current OLED! :D
 

MEGATAMA

Active Member
Samsung should do this move years ago,now thy are in clash betwen LG oleds and Chinese lcds.
FALD are in the end waaay to expensive and still have all the minuses of lcd tech in smaller or biger amount....
 

GadgetObsessed

Well-known Member
It is interesting that Samsung have gone for QD-OLED rather than any sort of direct QD emissive display.

In a QD-OLED display the OLED produces a blue back-light which is then absorbed by quantum dots and re-emitted as either red or blue light - so you end up with all three primary colours. As all of the light energy is created by an OLED these displays will not have resolved the issues of burn-in.

The other way of getting quantum dots to emit light is by energising them with electrons rather than photons. But I assume that as Samsung have not chosen to go this way, that such a technology is still some way off.
 

richardsim7

Distinguished Member
It is interesting that Samsung have gone for QD-OLED rather than any sort of direct QD emissive display.

In a QD-OLED display the OLED produces a blue back-light which is then absorbed by quantum dots and re-emitted as either red or blue light - so you end up with all three primary colours. As all of the light energy is created by an OLED these displays will not have resolved the issues of burn-in.

The other way of getting quantum dots to emit light is by energising them with electrons rather than photons. But I assume that as Samsung have not chosen to go this way, that such a technology is still some way off.
So if they're using all blue OLEDs, that should mean far more even wear? Burn-in normally comes from one OLED colour dying faster (ie: red pixels) as I understand it
 

GadgetObsessed

Well-known Member
So if they're using all blue OLEDs, that should mean far more even wear? Burn-in normally comes from one OLED colour dying faster (ie: red pixels) as I understand it
Possibly as it does seem that red images cause more issues than other for burn in. However, if one part of the screen is frequently brighter than the rest of the screen e.g. a bright banner or logo, then that banner/logo will still burn in.
 

GadgetObsessed

Well-known Member
I thought with QD there is no need for a colour filter as well?
You have the blue backlight creating light which is absorbed by the quantum dots in each sub-pixel and remitted as another colour e.g. green. I assume that the output still has to be filtered because:
(a) Possibly not all of the blue light is absorbed by the quantum dots. If the gaps between quantum dots are big enough for a photon then some light may get through the quantum dot layer.
(b) To emit light of the required frequency the quantum dots have to be of the right size. For example something like 2nm for green, 6nm for red. I wonder if there is some manufacturing variation in size which makes the light output not just pure and then requires filtering.
 

the hoff

Active Member
I think this does sound like an interesting development but not sure if the end result will be dramatically different from current (LG) OLEDs

Also can't believe the number of people still obsessing about burn in...I have owned plasmas since 2004 (three) and and an OLED for nearly three years now and never had a hint of burn in on any of them...I realise some people have had issues but from my experience at least, I would say this is not a major problem.
 

P-P-S-S

Active Member
Well I am going ahead and will get the 55" Q90R and plan to enjoy (all being well) for a good 10 years before i consider buying another one. Good ol' tried and tested LCD technology. By then I will see what technology has been tried and tested and gives the most benefits.
 

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