NEWS: LG launches new CineBeam 4K UHD Laser projector

dr no

Moderator
Sounds good. Any mention of cost bracket?
 

kedar301

Active Member

Says $2699 USD

I am wondering what would be the actual contrast ratio. Manufacturers are known to give unrealistic numbers then actual home cinema experience.

This has a standard 0.47" TI chip so I don't expect much on the contrast side. Being said that the brightness will be really good and may allow someone to watch TV or sports during the day time too.
 

kedar301

Active Member
No DLP can ever be without RBE. I am not one of those who see it unless it's very bad so won't affect me.
I am more concerned about their CR levels with dynamic iris.
 

alebonau

Well-known Member
No DLP can ever be without RBE. I am not one of those who see it unless it's very bad so won't affect me.
I am more concerned about their CR levels with dynamic iris.

unfortunately HDR and higher lumens is aggravating RBE in current projectors it seems. and yes contrast also seems to have gone down toilet with these 4k uhd supporting models.

ps if you go for a 3panel DLP (way out of budget for most folk) then i believe RBE is no longer there. eg the big barco projectors and such. it is just these single chip domestic affordable units that have RBE ...as need a colour wheel due to only having the one panel.
 

kedar301

Active Member
No probs with lamp apart from regular changes. Also the sRGB brightness on these lamp based projectors are very low compared to laser.
 

alebonau

Well-known Member
No probs with lamp apart from regular changes. Also the sRGB brightness on these lamp based projectors are very low compared to laser.

how regular is regular ? most manage 3000-4000 hours easy and epsons lamps are cheap as chips ! and you can keep changing lamps vs a laser thats once done is done ! as far as brightness ? sorry they calibrate pretty well for brightness. if you mean luminance ? there isnt actually that much between them. the quality ones that is ... not the silly high lumen output claiming ones that tend to go poop very quickly ...
 

kedar301

Active Member
Look at the LG HU85 Lumen reviews and compare that with Epson TW9400

TW9400 sRGB is about 1050 ANSI Lm

LG HU85 is around 1900 ANSI Lm in expert calibrated

That's a massive difference in real world application
 

alebonau

Well-known Member
Look at the LG HU85 Lumen reviews and compare that with Epson TW9400

Well that’s to be expected ! The lg hu85 is a ust projector very close to screen(2-7”). That’s the reason it’s brighter ... not the laser !!!

The 9400 is not a ust it tends to get mounted by folk multiple of meters from screen

Comparing a ust to long throw projector is like comparing a monkey to a hippo :D

The LG also costs about twice what the Epson does and will need a special screen to do its best (again more cost) vs the Epson that will get away conventional screens and also can go quite bit larger than lg can manage

There’s no doubt the lg is excellent for what it is... but do have to compare to other products like it as relevant comparison :)
 

Tingo

Active Member
One of the more interesting settings for this is its aspect adjustment. I only have a benq 1070 so was amazed you can get rid of the black bars no matter what aspect the source material is. Is that standard on other pj's. Looks to make anamorphic lenses redundant.
 

Xenses

Active Member
No DLP can ever be without RBE.

Not true, see 3-Chip DLP.
Well that’s to be expected ! The lg hu85 is a ust projector very close to screen(2-7”). That’s the reason it’s brighter ... not the laser !!!

The 9400 is not a ust it tends to get mounted by folk multiple of meters from screen

Comparing a ust to long throw projector is like comparing a monkey to a hippo :D

Remember, the brightness quoted for these projectors (1050 and 1900 for the Epson and LG respectively) is in ANSI Lumens which involves measuring brightness at various points across a screen, therefore the distance from the screen has already been factored into the measurement.

If you move a projector further or closer to a screen while maintaining the same screen area there will be very little change in luminance due to the distance alone. Any change will be down to changing the zoom or F-stop of the lens.

I would also add for anyone else looking at this thread in relation to the LG HU810P, Rainbow effect or RBE is a strobing effect caused by displaying the three primary colours (Red, Green and Blue or 'RGB' sequentially through the use of a spinning colour wheel. All colours are not displayed at the same time as would be the case in 3 chip DLP or LCD projectors.

This new LG makes use of a 2 laser system which has separate lasers for red and blue and uses additional light output to activate green phosphors to cover all 3 primary colours. This does away with the need for the colour wheel altogether as it is able to show all colours at the same time (similar to a 3 chip system).

See below a quote from a question put to Gregg Lee of LG (Senior Product Trainer) in relation to the LG HU810P.
For starters, it does away with the old RGB spinning wheel approach, which means better color fidelity, better color saturation, and no more 'rainbow' effect.

So from LG's point of view this projector cannot exhibit RBE which was the main thing putting me off when I found out it was a DLP as every other attribute was exactly what I was looking for in a new projector.

Full disclose, I've never seen a laser based DLP in person so I'm not sure what, if any effects might be present during viewing. The only thing I've picked up was Spare Change's review on Youtube where he briefly mention seeing RBE which had me confused given what I've just quoted above. In my opinion however, although I watch his content to get an idea of the size/finish or products and get a preview of menu's etc, I think his technical knowledge and understanding is poor so I'll save my own judgement for when I see one in person but based on what LG have said if there's any issues with RBE I'll have no hesitation sending it back.
 

mmdd

Standard Member
What determines if there is a rainbow effect is the color sequencing speed of the laser controller. In the ust model it is 200-240hz (very low) and it seems that this is the same. It definitely has, I can see it on Youtube.
 

Xenses

Active Member
What determines if there is a rainbow effect is the color sequencing speed of the laser controller. In the ust model it is 200-240hz (very low) and it seems that this is the same. It definitely has, I can see it on Youtube.
Interesting, do you know why the laser has to show the colours in sequence if it has multiple sources? (or have a link to this information)

Do you have a link to the video you are talking about?
 

mmdd

Standard Member
Interesting, do you know why the laser has to show the colours in sequence if it has multiple sources? (or have a link to this information)

Do you have a link to the video you are talking about?
I do not understand the question. Even though it doesn't have a color wheel, the laser has to be turned off and on in an RGB sequence. If the switching speed is low, you will see rainbows. Cine4home's Ekki has commented that LG's UST using the same optical engine modulates at 200-240hz which is equivalent to a 4x color wheel. You need much more speed to avoid color breakdown.
In this video you can see clearly:
 

alebonau

Well-known Member
Last edited:

Xenses

Active Member
Read the part where it talks about DLP color sequencing :
If you use Chrome, you can translate it.

Perfect, great article. Exactly the thing I was looking for. The part that answers my question is this part;

Thanks to the high tilt frequencies, it is also possible to use only one DMD chip in a projector instead of three. The three basic colors are not modulated at the same time as with a 3-chip projector, but are projected onto the screen one after the other (sequential color reproduction). Due to the sluggishness of the human eye, the monochrome images of the primary colors mix in the brain to form a single colored image.

I didn't appreciate the three basic colours had to be presented tot he DMD chip sequentially regardless of the light source so as you say even without the colour wheel and using separate lasers the colours still have to be modulated separately.

It would appear looking at several reviews of the LG HU85LA UST projector using a similar light engine that RBE was imperceptible so have high hopes for this unit.

I can see what you mean in that video though, very noticeable (to the camera at least hard to say if it's visible to the naked eye). I had skipped that section as I wasn't interested in gaming at all.
 

alebonau

Well-known Member
And how about the actual real world contrast ratio?

I havent seen the particular one being talked about here but all DLPS have seen the single chip ones have all been horrendous for contrast. these are not also truly 4k which is the other thing but then the likes of epson is also just pixel shifting at this price point.
 

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