NEWS: LG Display unveils next generation OLED TV technology - New sizes and brighter panels

JonnyBingham

Active Member
Hopefully the 83 inch isn’t as ridiculously priced as last years 88 inch.
An OLED that size is never going to be cheap. OLED is and will remain a premium technology. It becomes more expensive per square inch beyond 65"at present. 88" was cut in half to £20k recently. For a screen which thrashes anything which a projector can and comes close to matching the scale of one I would say for a high end cinema enthusiast an 88" OLED which can offer cinema immersion at normal viewing distance, is a very attractive proposition.
 

youngsyp

Distinguished Member
No, I know what ABL and APL means.
ABL is measured at different APL levels from 1-100%! That´s what I often criticized that many reviewers don´t measering ABL at different brightness levels. The 100% and 10% window is not enough to show how the ABL is really working, even 25% and 50% is not enough for daytime viewing conditions. At high APL levels for daytime viewing, you need to measure maximum brightness in SDR higher than APL 25% and that´s the range where LG´s ABL design shines against Sony and Panasonic. The ABL from the 7 Series to the 9er Series was much more stable than the competition resulting in higher average brightness.
A lot of arbitrary statements there, with no basis in reality in my opinion.

Case in point, my GZ2000 is pinned at about 155 nits (peak white) for SDR and I have no issues watching that during the day.

I'd argue that most enthusiasts, who buy OLED panels, are in a similar situation and wouldn't do any critical viewing with daytime levels of ambient light either.
Those with no care for critical viewing and picture accuracy, don't buy OLEDs. They buy LCD light canons, so they can have their retina's seared even in broad daylight.

LGD improved the OLED stack for more efficiency (new blue) and more color purity (exchangig yellow green with new red and green emitter):

My first thought, as was the first reply to the linked post, was if they've achieved 90% of REC.2020, why isn't that the headline? If they'd done that, it really would be an achievement to shout about. And judging by your last link, where the slide states the DCI P3 coverage is still 99%, I.e. what current OLED's achieve, they've not achieved 90% coverage for REC.2020. That being the case, this link doesn't tell us anything.
That's just regurgitating the press release.

Contradictory videos. First two videos (the same video...) mention the new luminous layer makes up blue, red and green light improvements. The CNET video states it's only for green light. So who to believe...
20% more efficient design means, the screen reaching the same brightness than before at 20% less energy and so it can be also brighter than before without harming lifetime.
That is the sense of new more efficient emitters. Reaching longer lifetimes at higher brightness.

According LG Display factory specifications for the new evo panels are APL 25% (SDR) 550nits, APL 100% 185nits. Last generation was 450/150 nits.
Peak brightness will be much higher than that (I guess around 900-1000 nits). All measurements without a heat sink and at better color purity at higher APL levels:

Last year's CX peaked at 700nits. So a 20% increase there, is 840 nits. Some ways short of your assertion. And, the increase in APL only applies, according to LGD's figures, at 25% APL. At 100% APL, the new panel is less bright, by 19%.

The point I'm trying to make is that now, everything is assumption as none of these new displays have been reviewed. And until they have been reviewed, no comparison can be made with any display that's currently on the market.

Paul
 

d10brp

Well-known Member
Those with no care for critical viewing and picture accuracy, don't buy OLEDs. They buy LCD light canons, so they can have their retina's seared even in broad daylight.
I actually think those with little to no interest in picture accuracy are picking up OLEDs in quite large numbers at today's prices because it is seen as somewhat of a status symbol. I believe it is actually those who have done some research but who have been sold the hype of the "light cannon" effect* that are likely to choose an LCD at a similar price point.

*I have never given a super bright LCD a proper try out, maybe the hype is worth it, I just know I love my OLED picture
 

youngsyp

Distinguished Member
I actually think those with little to no interest in picture accuracy are picking up OLEDs in quite large numbers at today's prices because it is seen as somewhat of a status symbol. I believe it is actually those who have done some research but who have been sold the hype of the "light cannon" effect* that are likely to choose an LCD at a similar price point.
Possibly by I still don't think the vast majority of Joe Public will spend OLED money for a TV, especially as size is much more the status symbol, in my opinion. £1000+ for a 55" OLED isn't cheap, when you can buy a 70" LCD TV for about half that.

*I have never given a super bright LCD a proper try out, maybe the hype is worth it, I just know I love my OLED picture
Only if you have a preference for grey over black! :D

Paul
 

celle

Active Member
Last year's CX peaked at 700nits. So a 20% increase there, is 840 nits. Some ways short of your assertion. And, the increase in APL only applies, according to LGD's figures, at 25% APL. At 100% APL, the new panel is less bright, by 19%.

APL 25% and APL 100 % are the typically factory specifications for displays. Don´t mix and compare specifications from a professional manufacture like LGD with specifications from a consumer manufacture and calibrator like LGE and all the reviewers. There are many LG TVs peaked much higher than 700nits. Older LG generations reaching over 800 nits at D65. It´s the decision of the TV manufacture how hard they drive the raw panels and it´s a decision between color purity and accuracy, peak brightness, ABL and lifetime. You can reduce peak brightness for more stable ABL with higher average brightness - that´s what LG did 2017 with the 7 series, from APL 1 - 70 % they reaching over 300 nits at APL 70% and peaked not higher than around 350 nits @ APL 10%.

You compare also a raw panel with a consumer TV. 185nits @ APL 100% is around 20% brighter than 150 nits? Isn´t it? But LG Display talking about 20% more efficiency not brightness.

My first thought, as was the first reply to the linked post, was if they've achieved 90% of REC.2020, why isn't that the headline? If they'd done that, it really would be an achievement to shout about.

Because they don´t reaching 90% of BT.2020. The spec sheet is misleading here. With ordinary color filters they can´t get more colors. Don´t mix wider color gamut with color purity and color accuracy. There is another site from the same old presentation from 2018! (now we have 2021 and corona) with aims for 2022 with even better emitters and APL 100% @ 300 nits and 90% BT.2020 as the next step. It was only a forecast. Timeframe and aims are changing, because circumstances are changing.
Also with 20% better efficiency, lifetime (LT95 @ 1000nits) will be of course better at same brightness levels compared to the old generation.


The CNET video states it's only for green light.

They can´t change yellow green to pure green without red. They need green + red together to generate yellow in the WOLED stack. They doing this for better color purity. More efficiency coming from better blue, better color filters, or top emission without a polarizer on top.

G1 vs. C1:
 

davidcrofter

Well-known Member
This press release does seem a bit vague. Next Gen is maybe pushing it a bit but it does point towards it being an upgraded new panel rather than simply using the tech that Panasonic have perfected or else it couldn't be classed as something new.

Wonder if Panasonic will get their hands on these new panels this year?
 

bongo123

Active Member
I gotta say my 55CX is in a room with a ton of natural light sitting in front of a huge bay window and i'm perfectly happy with its daytime picture, hell i cant really see how the picture can get any better on it tbh and i don't even bother going into the settings to tweak sh*t, 4K stuff in the evening on Cinema Mode at my couch distance looks insanely good
 

CliffordinWales

Standard Member
Possibly by I still don't think the vast majority of Joe Public will spend OLED money for a TV, especially as size is much more the status symbol, in my opinion. £1000+ for a 55" OLED isn't cheap, when you can buy a 70" LCD TV for about half that.

It's true to say that both (a) OLED is selling very well and (b) cheap, large LCDs dominate the market.

 

youngsyp

Distinguished Member
APL 25% and APL 100 % are the typically factory specifications for displays. Don´t mix and compare specifications from a professional manufacture like LGD with specifications from a consumer manufacture and calibrator like LGE and all the reviewers. There are many LG TVs peaked much higher than 700nits. Older LG generations reaching over 800 nits at D65. It´s the decision of the TV manufacture how hard they drive the raw panels and it´s a decision between color purity and accuracy, peak brightness, ABL and lifetime. You can reduce peak brightness for more stable ABL with higher average brightness - that´s what LG did 2017 with the 7 series, from APL 1 - 70 % they reaching over 300 nits at APL 70% and peaked not higher than around 350 nits @ APL 10%.

You compare also a raw panel with a consumer TV. 185nits @ APL 100% is around 20% brighter than 150 nits? Isn´t it? But LG Display talking about 20% more efficiency not brightness.



Because they don´t reaching 90% of BT.2020. The spec sheet is misleading here. With ordinary color filters they can´t get more colors. Don´t mix wider color gamut with color purity and color accuracy. There is another site from the same old presentation from 2018! (now we have 2021 and corona) with aims for 2022 with even better emitters and APL 100% @ 300 nits and 90% BT.2020 as the next step. It was only a forecast. Timeframe and aims are changing, because circumstances are changing.
Also with 20% better efficiency, lifetime (LT95 @ 1000nits) will be of course better at same brightness levels compared to the old generation.




They can´t change yellow green to pure green without red. They need green + red together to generate yellow in the WOLED stack. They doing this for better color purity. More efficiency coming from better blue, better color filters, or top emission without a polarizer on top.

G1 vs. C1:
So much contradiction and inconsistency. I responded to your comments, using the context you used, and as that doesn't fit your agenda, you're now asking me not to do that?

And one piece of information from the manufacturer, that you linked, is misleading but the other information, you also linked from the same manufacturer is fact?

It's clear, as I pointed out at the end of my last reply, this is all assumption at this time as there have been no professional reviews of these new panels. Until that happens, there are no hard facts about them. No amount of linking to spurious sources will change that.

Paul
 

Evinger

Well-known Member

wilson69

Standard Member
I'll wait for new tv tech as I've stuck with oleds I've had 4 and have had some problems and that's being polite it's true once you go oled you can't go back but I need to move on
 

fluxedman

Active Member
I'll wait for new tv tech as I've stuck with oleds I've had 4 and have had some problems and that's being polite it's true once you go oled you can't go back but I need to move on

have been a strong advocate in LGs lack of quality control approach over the past few months but hear ya once you go black you cant go back...

My CX went faulty after 10 weeks little use also.

Mind mentioning some of the OLED issues you had ?
 

Parallax982

Active Member
We really don't know enough at this point to say anything with certainty. I look forward to the first look and then in-depth reviews to come. Not just for LG but with regard to all manufacturers. I've been sitting on the sideline, enjoying my Kuros, waiting for OLED to become a "no-brainer". Almost pulled the trigger on the Vizio on Black Friday but held back. I don't necessarily care about having the very best. I'm not in this for bragging rights. But if an OLED comes along at 55 inches that clearly surpasses my Kuros for $1k or less, I'll pull the trigger.
 

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