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NEWS: LG Display OLED TVs receive low blue light certification

gbjbaanb

Member
I would have thought the last thing a TV needs is "low blue light". When my phone goes into "nighttime" mode, the screen gets a decidedly muddy look to it. Not that I notiuced after a bit, but then, its a phone, not something I watch movies on.

Besides, its beginning to look like blue light itself isn't a problem - its a) staying up until 2am staring at your phone screen that's keeping you awake, not the fault of blue light, b) daylight has UV in it that harms you, not the blue bits in it! So ... "meh".
 

sagaris99

Well-known Member
I would have thought the last thing a TV needs is "low blue light". When my phone goes into "nighttime" mode, the screen gets a decidedly muddy look to it. Not that I notiuced after a bit, but then, its a phone, not something I watch movies on.

Besides, its beginning to look like blue light itself isn't a problem - its a) staying up until 2am staring at your phone screen that's keeping you awake, not the fault of blue light, b) daylight has UV in it that harms you, not the blue bits in it! So ... "meh".
There’s no question that being on your device late at night is a contributing factor, but there is sound science in this. UV light suppresses melatonin, which regulates the circadian rhythm. Because blue light is closer to UV on the spectrum, exposure to bright blue light in a dark environment will again suppress the melatonin, confusing the cycle, making it harder to go to sleep, and longer until you hit the deeper stages of sleep - in summary, a worse nights sleep.

brighter, whiter lights (created by yellow and blue) are also attributed to the causes of eye strain. The more ‘yellow’ the image can look, the easier the strain on the eye.

By removing the blue light from the device‘s panel as much as possible, melatonin can still be produced, meaning your sleep isn’t as disrupted. Of course, we could all put our devices away, but that’s not very 2020 :laugh:
 

Evinger

Well-known Member
I understand the science behind what blue light does to the body, and the desire to avoid unnecessary eye strain, but surely doesn't having a maximum "safe" blue light level on TV's hold back the maximum brightness of the TV, as all the colours need to stay in the correct proportion to produce an excellent picture quality?
I'm obviously missing something here.
 

kurtz

Active Member
There are two measurements contained in their announcement: first, that the OLED emits "50% lower blue light than the standard" - presumably this means 50W/sr/m2. Fair enough: this is a specific measurement.

The second figure is for "60 percent of blue light that the same-size premium LCD TV displays on the market are reported to emit" - I don't like this statement because it contains the word "reported" which means it is not a hard measurement, rather a 'guesstimate'. But all this number means is that OLEDs are dimmer than LCDs - which something we have known for a long time.

Assuming that the OLED and LCD are both calibrated to display white correctly, then surely the OLED will be displaying 60% less blue light, 60% less red light and 60% less green light than the LCD. Big deal. Its just not as bright.
 

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