NEWS: Disney predicts shorter theatrical release windows

Fillumgeek

Well-known Member
Many eyes on Disney, who have the means to 'mix it up'.
Black Widow will be a test film you'd think. May seems a little early for big box office at the cinema for that one.
 

La Finta Nonna

Active Member
Without any doubt the current climate has changed the way people watch films and almost certainly forever. The theatrical window of ninety days already seems like a relic from long ago and it certainly wouldn’t surprise me to see that number halved at the very least
 

Drax1

Distinguished Member
Without any doubt the current climate has changed the way people watch films and almost certainly forever. The theatrical window of ninety days already seems like a relic from long ago and it certainly wouldn’t surprise me to see that number halved at the very least
Yes, the 90 day thing seems done for. With other studios already moving forward with big changes (Paramount/Warner), I fully expect the 40/45 day window to be the new normal.
 

BOFH_UK

Active Member
This might seem an odd thing to say but I've been quite impressed with how Disney have handled the last year. They've made some small moves to test the waters, haven't panicked (looking at you WB) and seem to be looking to genuinely change their business model in a way that makes sense for customer demand without decimating revenue streams.

Now what I personally would like to hear is the other side of this equation. There's light at the end of the pandemic tunnel so what are cinema chains planning? How are they intending to not only get people back in but make their offerings more enticing in the face of on-demand services? Sure there's always going to be a potentially substantial number of customers who want the big screen experience but is that enough? Is the model the same for the really big multiplexes as it is for the smaller ones? Is there a market for a more... uh, shall we say botique cinema experience that doesn't focus so much on the big blockbusters to take up some of the struggling locations?

None of this is new of course, the problem's been building for a while and in fairness there's been some effort to adapt. The huge Cineworld at the Dome is a good example of that with premium experiences providing a full-blown 'evening out' along with different screening options and enough screens to keep variety up (plus of course the rest of the O2 entertainment offerings). Now though it might be necessary to apply those changes a hell of a lot faster than originally planned and it'd be nice to see if anything along those lines is in the works.
 

Fillumgeek

Well-known Member
This might seem an odd thing to say but I've been quite impressed with how Disney have handled the last year. They've made some small moves to test the waters, haven't panicked (looking at you WB) and seem to be looking to genuinely change their business model in a way that makes sense for customer demand without decimating revenue streams.

Now what I personally would like to hear is the other side of this equation. There's light at the end of the pandemic tunnel so what are cinema chains planning? How are they intending to not only get people back in but make their offerings more enticing in the face of on-demand services? Sure there's always going to be a potentially substantial number of customers who want the big screen experience but is that enough? Is the model the same for the really big multiplexes as it is for the smaller ones? Is there a market for a more... uh, shall we say botique cinema experience that doesn't focus so much on the big blockbusters to take up some of the struggling locations?

None of this is new of course, the problem's been building for a while and in fairness there's been some effort to adapt. The huge Cineworld at the Dome is a good example of that with premium experiences providing a full-blown 'evening out' along with different screening options and enough screens to keep variety up (plus of course the rest of the O2 entertainment offerings). Now though it might be necessary to apply those changes a hell of a lot faster than originally planned and it'd be nice to see if anything along those lines is in the works.
Good post. I can only anecdotally mention that The Genesis Cinema, in East London plans to open a Beer garden, to take advantage of the process of loosening Covid restrictions. Of course, this will get some money into the business rather than be the new business model for an independent cinema. Although actually, watch a film, discuss it in the beer garden afterwards seems a lovely idea in the warmer months!

And on Disney, I agree their response has been calm and quite impressive - and I say that now that I'm a shareholder, with an eye on their long-term position for a small part of my pension.
 

Lucky woman

Member
I am sure that this is how it will be. And now, and henceforth, films will be shown in theaters for about 1.5 months. Not more!:confused: Maybe even less ...

Too many people are used to watching movies at home. And it will be very difficult to change these habits. So now, visiting theaters will no longer be such an everyday affair.
 

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