Question Newbie - Setting up a Home Network - Need Advice

mosh

Standard Member
Hey All,

Been a while since I've last been on the forum, but I've just moved into to my new house which unfortunately is pretty much refurbished so there is no routing of Ethernet cabling in any parts of the house. Now there may be hope, as I've found somewhere to install a rack above the lounge and wanted some advice on the options I've come up with and the equipment for each (sorry for the huge list of options):

The first element I've researched is the rack, i'm limited by a depth and width of 550MM, but have found the following options:

1. Penn Elcom 18U:
R6418V-M6 (Depth 406mm / Depth 450MM):
1. Vented Door: £156.88
2. Glass Door: £165.13
3. Castor base: £25
4. Castors: R8200HD: £24.12
Total: £206 / £214.25
--------------------------------------------------
2. Comms Express:
WM1865B - Datacel 18U 500MM Deep £138
--------------------------------------------------
3. SYS RACKZ - 18U 19" 550mm deep £171
--------------------------------------------------
4. Comms Rack:
18U 550MM: £126
--------------------------------------------------
5. Cable Monkey:
18U 550MM deep: £156.96 + Castors (£30)
--------------------------------------------------
6. Lamda-Tek (LMS data Dynamode CAB-W18U-EL550): £143.38

Each of the above have their drawer, shelves, PDU options etc., but wanted to get some advice on which of the above you'd go with?

So in the Rack, minus the ancillaries, I've had a think about what I'll need in the rack:

1. Keystone patch panel (24 port), something like this: https://www.amazon.co.uk/kenable-Gi...WG7BSER6WSX&psc=1&refRID=1BR7VWG80WG7BSER6WSX

2. 24 Port Switch; leaning toward a Uniquiti managed PoE switch: US-24-250W 24 Port Switch 250W | Yay.com

3. I have Virgin SH3, have historically been an Asus router guy, and leaning towards the new AX router range like the GT11000AX, but thinking would this be less effective than a mesh system from Ubiquiti themselves? The house is circa 2500 SQ/FT, but if i leant to the Asus, they are just about to release their own AX6600 mesh setup. Will be good to get some advice on this. I guess another option would be to purchase the Ubiquiti EdgeRouter or Unify Security Gateway Router with the Access points although this will be a bit more than Asus.

4. I've opted for the keystone patch panel just so that it's easier to manage the cabling, now as the house is already decorated, I was thinking to rout some Cat6A / 7 cabling externally and via the attic down into some of the rooms, so have seen a reel of this cable:
https://www.amazon.co.uk/TDA-Ethern...GC8KFBX5A4G&psc=1&refRID=1CHRRZAZ1GC8KFBX5A4G

Will need to terminate these although I will probably have around 5-6 ethernet cable routed initially.

I think that's it for now, would love to know which rack you would have from the long list above, but also in terms of hardware that will sit in the rack, what would you opt to go with and if i'm missing anything, please reply with what else I would need.

Really appreciate your input on my first networking setup!

Thanks,
 

mickevh

Distinguished Member
When sizing your rack, bear in mind that the depth figure is probably an external dimension and you need to make allowance for how far back the mounting rails are from the front and thence allow some space at the back for cables. For example, lets say you have a switch with a nominal depth of 400mm from the mounting ears, you need allow 50mm or so "room" at the back so you can plug in and route the power cable.

I wouldn't bother with keystone - punching down UTP onto regular IDC terminations isn't difficult and a "normal" patch panel will be a bit cheaper and easier to install. Bulk cable for permanent cable runs is usually "solid core" and designed to be punched onto IDC, not plugs (you should really use "special" plugs for the purpose.)

I also wouldn't bother with cat7. It will almost certainly contain loads of shielding which will all need to be earthed and IIRC uses different connectors to lower cats. Ethernet doesn't work any better because you give it higher cat cables - cat5e is more than good enough for Gbit ethernet up to 100m (sometimes further.) If you can find some cat6/6a (that doesn't have shielding) for the same price you can argue one "might as well," but it's unlikely to work any "better."

I'm fond of saying, most DIY'er don't test their installs with the very expensive test equipment required to certify that the job, so strictly speaking they are not "cat" anything. But that doesn't mean they won't "work" for ethernet - ethenet is well within the performance headroom and you have to do a spectacularly bad job for it not to work - poor termination is the biggest culprit.

There's also lots of other stipulations for the higher cats - for example, it should all be installed into proper containment, cable should be "layed" in and not "pulled," cable ties shouldn't be zip locks (velcro is preferred,) yada, yada. There's much more to it that what "cat" cable and bits and bobs you buy. (Remember you patch panel and face plates need to match also - higher cats sometimes use fatter conductors.)

My favourite page for the DIY'er wanting to do UTP... How to wire Ethernet Cables

If you want your router to act as a Wi-Fi AP, bear in mind that placing such a router inside a metal box (your rack) could seriously attenuate if not curtail the Wi-Fi performance. That's no problem of course if your router "just" routes (doesn't do Wi-Fi) but if you want said router to be a Wi-Fi AP, it would be better to have it outside your rack, ideally in free space. Wi-Fi hates going through metal and anything wet, (fish tank, foliage, cat, etc.)
 
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mosh

Standard Member
That's really helpful mickevh, I was considering to placing the core router if I opt with a standalone Asus / Netgear outside of the rack, but if Ubiquiti, then I guess the gateway / router will be housed with the access points located via PoE.

In terms of rack, of the ones I've mentioned, does any have a preference from them or am I missing any? The dimensions I have to play with are: 550MM Width, 560MM Depth and height around a metre or so, although sticking with 18U at the moment.
 

techquest

Well-known Member
Rack System

Your Penn Elcom rack is the Rolls Royce of cabs and are made to last. I have always used their products for racks and flight cases and never had an issue with them. The dimensions are probably best suited as you have the advantage of some space re your 550mm restriction. The only decisions is whether you can live with its cost.

POE Switch

Your choice of POE switch is good. As an alternative you might consider something like

24 port Gigabit Managed Switch with POE from Netgear JGS524PE-100EUS

24 port Gigabit Managed Switch with POE from Netgea


TP-Link SG3424P 24 Port POE+ Gigabit Switch




TP-Link SG3424P 24 Port POE+ Gigabit Switch

I have used both of these in numerous installations without ever having an issue.

Rack PSU

You might want to invest in a rack PSU so that all your equipment is powered and earthed from the same source. Both Kenable and Dynamode make good product that range from 6 way to 12 way, vertical and horizontal mount types. I’ve used both and can vouch for them and your looking at approx £26 to £30.


Cat Cabling System

upload_2019-6-11_20-57-27.png


upload_2019-6-11_20-57-46.png


Most people won’t really care whether they’re using Cat-5e, 6, 6a, or 7 cables at home. The Internet connection is the bottleneck, faster cables won’t help that. Using a Cat-6, 6a, or even 7 and 7a cable can enable faster speeds when transferring files or otherwise communicating between two computers on the local network, but the truth is most people won’t even notice. You can see from the above table that speeds are governed by cable run lengths, but also by the integrity of the network, and there really is negligible difference in bandwidth as far as the home network is concerned. But I'm a great believer in installing ready for the future, who knows what is around the corner. You can easily change anything that attaches to the cable, but changing cable in the future is obviously not so easy.

Your choice of cable may be okay, but there is insufficient data as to the manufacturer, or indeed its suitability for external use, which you have said your going to need to do. The other issue is if you have 5 to 6 runs, attic to anywhere downstairs, then that is going to be approx 8mtrs per run, which will eat into your 50mtr roll quite quickly, and my guess is you will also want to install, at some time , stuff like cctv cameras and an outlet for your smart TV etc. So if your stuck on your cable choice then why not go for the 100mtr reel for £63.36 incl delivery.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B01L4664N0/ref=psdc_430464031_t1_B0749NQRK3

If I were installing in my home it would be Belden cable, they bought CDT (Cable Design Technologies) one of the best cable manufactures in the world. Sadly seemingly expensive at approx. £320 per 305mtr box, the 305mtr box being the industry standard packaging, which is easy to feed from into the installation place, and gives you a run off total left on the reel, important if your doing it for a living.

Which ever cable you use be very careful with bends. Most folk who are not into such installations do not realise that over bending the cable, easy to do, will actually damage it and can cause anything from data loss to the cable not working at all.

Patch Panel

The patch panel your suggesting is CAT6 product and does not look as though it’s shielded, whilst your cable choice Cat7, is shielded. You’d be better off going for a CAT6a patch panel, even though you intend using a Cat7 cable. Anything Cat7, as far as connectors are concerned, is going to be expensive, not to mention finding a supplier, which is not easy at the moment. Here are 2 alternatives, but I would favour the 2nd one as it has better facilities for laying out and supporting the cables in your rack.

Use only Velcro type cable ties in you rack, ordinary tie wraps can easily damage you Cat cables.

Alternative Suggestions

1U 24 Port Cat6A Shielded Keystone Jack Patch Panel - UT-899CAT6APP24 : £46.10 incl VAT

https://cpc.farnell.com/unbranded/ut-899cat6app24/24-port-6a-shield-1u-patch/dp/CS31597?st=keystone 19

upload_2019-6-11_21-3-29.png



24 Port Cat6A Patch Panel - SGF24 : £59.94 incl VAT

https://cpc.farnell.com/tuk/sgf24/24-port-6a-idc-stp-patch-panel/dp/CS31586?st=cat6a patch panel


upload_2019-6-11_21-4-50.png



Patch Cords

You really should match your Cat 6a installation, particulally the Patch Panel, with CAT 6a patch cords. But do not choose the flat type as they are not really Cat anything types and do not meet the standard.

568A vs 568B Cabling Standards

The 568A & 568B cabling standard defines how the cables in you Cat system are terminated. You can choose either, however you need to make sure that both ends of the system are the same i.e. 568A to 568A. Mix them and you will have a cross over type circuit, only really used to connect 2 computers together, not much, need for it these days and of no use to you in a Cat cabling system, your equipment would just not work.

RJ45 Pin Outs

The pin outs are the same for both sockets and plugs, pin to pin.


upload_2019-6-11_21-5-48.png


Wall Outlets

Cable monkey are a good supplier of Cat6a wall outlets. They supply the keystone range, which though expensive, are an excellent product. There is a range form wall mounted to dryline back boxes and would probaly be approx £6 to £7 depending on your choice of jack module.

A word of caution here though, Cat7 cable has a bigger conductor size to that of Cat6a so you would want to make sure you could get the conductor into the jack module without any issues, such as it shearing the conductor and leaving you with a possible partial or full disconnection on the termination.

Cat6a Modules & Outlets


Hope the above helps and please let us know how your getting on or if you need any advice.
 
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maf1970

Well-known Member
I agree with Mickevh.

Rack - choice is up to whatever you prefer. Just make sure you can get the external dimensions of it to make sure it fits.

Patch Panel - cat 5e should be fine,only go six if you can get it for not much more. Also just make it a standard patch panel for the reasons Mickevh gave.

Network cabling - normally comes in 100m reel and 305m Box. Buy the cabling from a networking company. e.g. Comms Express do a 100m Reel of Cat 5e cabling for £24.

Switch - is the Ubiquiti one you have specified not a bit of overkill for home use ? I can't see you needing 24 ports for POE use. I think it would be better and cheaper to look for a small POE switch to cater for that requirement then an ordinary switch for the rest.
 

Kristian

Member
Just a couple of comments to techquests's post, IYDM,

Cat Cabling System

View attachment 1161441

View attachment 1161442

Most people won’t really care whether they’re using Cat-5e, 6, 6a, or 7 cables at home. The Internet connection is the bottleneck, faster cables won’t help that. Using a Cat-6, 6a, or even 7 and 7a cable can enable faster speeds when transferring files or otherwise communicating between two computers on the local network, but the truth is most people won’t even notice.
The diagrams are missing a little bit of info. Cat6 will support 10Gb Ethernet to 55m in non bunched cabling installs, and 35m in bunches.

Using the different cables will not 'enable faster speeds when transferring files' per se as Ethernet sends frames at the fixed rate of the protocol being used, e.g. 1Gb means 1Gb all the time. Granted, the different cabling will support different Ethernet standards but that depends on the NICs, not just the cable.

568A vs 568B Cabling Standards

The 568A & 568B cabling standard defines how the cables in you Cat system are laid out. You can choose either, however you need to make sure that both ends of the system are the same i.e. 568A to 568A. Mix them and you will have a cross over type circuit, only really used to connect 2 computers together, not much, need for it these days and of no use to you in a Cat cabling system, your equipment would just not work.
568B is the preferred standard, I've never seen 568A in the wild. As said though, as long as both ends are the same it will work fine.

To the OP, IMHO (having done all this for a long time), assuming home use and not a mansion, Cat6 will be fine for now (1Gb) and will give the ability for 10Gb in the future should it ever be needed. Even using Cat5E will still give years of service...
 

techquest

Well-known Member
I agree with you Kristian there is info missing but just wanted it to be kept basic.

Guess it depends where in the world we've worked, I've seen plenty of 568A installations across many countries. But straight through (568B) terminations should be the preferred method of installation. 568A should only really be used for cross over purposes.

As you confirmed in your opening statement, Cat 6 already supports 10GB now. It does so, theoretically at run lengths of 164ft /50mtrs, but the capacity will only be guaranteed if the installation conforms to all the requirements in a perfect world and installations are rarely perfect.

I also agree that a Cat 6 option would be more than adequate if installed now. But my guess is the op has decided he want's to install Cat7 cable with the future in mind, nothing wrong with that. However he will need to be aware it's a bit more difficult to terminate given there are no coded colour stripes on the pairs, as opposed to other Cat cable types, and it's easy to get them mixed up, especially if your new to it.
 
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mosh

Standard Member
TechQuest - thank you for the informative post, I've also added a picture of the potential spot as to where the rack will sit (it's located in the far side of the house).

Regarding the Rack, the only slight concern I have with the Penn-Elcom rack is it is smaller at 450MM depth versus 500/550 with the others.
20190612_190232.png
 
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techquest

Well-known Member
I've also added a picture of the potential spot as to where the rack will sit (it's located in the far side of the house).
I can see that you would be pushed for room, but have seen smaller spaces utilised.

Regarding the Rack, the only slight concern I have with the Penn-Elcom rack is it is smaller at 450MM depth versus 500/550 with the others.
Rack type servers are generally deeper than both of those dimensions, typically anything from 600mm to 700mm + deep and width wise will only fit in the 550mm rack. You can get what are called "short depth"/ "shallow depth" types, but they are not that common so could be expensive. I can run a check on various servers out there if needs be, but sadly companies seem not very forthcoming on dimensions in their general sales blurb, dimensions no doubt being bottom of their to do list. So the question here is will you ever want to install one in your rack?
 
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mosh

Standard Member
techquest - so would a 450mm depth be an issue? The Penn Elcom is 450 deep 600 wide, the others on the list are either 500 or 550mm deep
 

techquest

Well-known Member
1. Penn Elcom 18U:
R6418V-M6 (Depth 406mm / Depth 450MM):
So as you can see there's confusion in your opening para.

so would a 450mm depth be an issue? The Penn Elcom is 450 deep 600 wide, the others on the list are either 500 or 550mm deep
There is also also confusion in the above para as the 600 you've stated obviously wouldn't slot into your 550mm space anyway.

Sorry for the confusion I caused, I was obviously having a bad few moments it seems. Your 550 x 550 space is plenty enough for the Penn Elcom R6418V-M6 which for sure is 17.72" (450 mm) deep and what I believe to be 19" (482.6 mm) wide. But my guess is we should both recheck that to make sure as Penn Elcom only quote the depth of the R6418V-M6 product on the site. I can't find anywhere that states the width, which I am assuming is 19", but that could be a wrong assumption on my part.

As I said the 450 of the R6418V-M6 or 550 depth of your space will only give you an issue should you ever consider putting a server into your rack/cab/space because servers are usually much deeper than that, albeit you can supposedly get shallow/short depth versions of servers.
 

Markr123

Active Member
Rack type servers are generally deeper than both of those dimensions, typically anything from 600mm to 700mm + deep and width wise will only fit in the 550mm rack. You can get what are called "short depth"/ "shallow depth" types, but they are not that common so could be expensive. I can run a check on various servers out there if needs be, but sadly companies seem not very forthcoming on dimensions in their general sales blurb, dimensions no doubt being bottom of their to do list. So the question here is will you ever want to install one in your rack?
I think techquest raises a good point. What is going in the rack in the cupboard longer term? If you ever plan to put rack mount nas / pc / server then you will need a 600 deep rack. You might get away with 550 it would be really tight. Even then, in a cupboard as you have posted, heat will be a challenge.

My (work in progress (currently wiring the house) in the under stairs cupboard has a bunch of kit.
For servers, I use Dell PowerEdge R210’s as they are short depth. My FreeNas box is also in a short case of -450mm.

0F7C5298-178C-4912-AA0A-895C4D966E2B.jpeg
 

techquest

Well-known Member
My (work in progress (currently wiring the house) in the under stairs cupboard has a bunch of kit.

For servers, I use Dell PowerEdge R210’s as they are short depth. My FreeNas box is also in a short case of -450mm.
Nice piece of kit Markr123 and as you say a short depth server. Yes I agree on the heat aspect but would assume that mosh might include a fan system if he's at all going down the route of installing a server. The problem with that, as we all know, is noise which is inevitable, no matter what manufacturers claim to be quiet.

Did you install a Cat cabling system? Is your terminal also under the stairs or in another part of the house?
 

Markr123

Active Member
Nice piece of kit Markr123 and as you say a short depth server. Yes I agree on the heat aspect but would assume that mosh might include a fan system if he's at all going down the route of installing a server. The problem with that, as we all know, is noise which is inevitable, no matter what manufacturers claim to be quiet.

Did you install a Cat cabling system? Is your terminal also under the stairs or in another part of the house?
Cheers techquest. It’s been a labour of love and expense! I’ve run cat6 from patch panel to faceplates downstairs (x6 living room, x6 to study, a number to various Ubiquiti AP’s and I’m running another x20 to a patch panel in the loft for distribution to other parts of the house inc AP’s and CCTV. I’ve recently run x2 fibre cables (with LAG) to another managed switch in an out building.

Currently rethinking cooling / heat extraction. Have several temp controlled fans to circulate air. Manage to keep around 30 degrees most of the time but it’s very challenging when the Dells are all running too. Never underestimate how much heat a NAS and a few switches - especially PoE ones generate in a fairly confined space!!

Sorry, not sure of your meaning re “terminal”. I have PC’s in the study and also my master socket.
 
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Markr123

Active Member
Mosh, I can highly recommend the comms express datacel cabs. I have one in the garage and another going in the loft soon.
Furthermore, the Ubiquiti switches are great at moderating their own temp only using the fans when needed. I used to have a Netgear Switch where the fans ran 24/7 at 100%. Even in the cupboard, there was just an annoying hum. My new Netgear managed switches are passive so silent. The Ubiquiti just spools up for a short time when it needs.
 
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techquest

Well-known Member
Sorry, not sure of your meaning re “terminal”. I have PC’s in the study and also my master socket.
Just the interface to the system, VDU and keyboard. Was interested as it was under the stairs, but you answered my Q in your statement above.

Netgear make good gear, I have recommended their stuff in countless installations I've been involved in and have a few myself.

Good to see you've got some cat6 in the network, fibre too. I was fortunate to work for one of the best cable manufactures in the world so I got to work and play with both copper and fibre, single mode & multi mode, and all the specifications as they evolved. So installing fibre was a no brainer and a simple process for me in my own network.

As you have pointed out to mosh noise and heat are two things to watch out for, particularity if your going to be running the installation 24/7.
 

mosh

Standard Member
Thanks Mark and Techquest. I'm in the process of creating a list with price etc. Of everything that I'll need and post it up. In terms of server I'm not really thinking of having one yet but wanted know if having one is beneficial given how cheap AWS is to store days etc. But I need to think of the use cases for it.


Mosh, I can highly recommend the comms express datacel cabs. I have one in the garage and another going in the loft soon.
Furthermore, the Ubiquiti switches are great at moderating their own temp only using the fans when needed. I used to have a Netgear Switch where the fans ran 24/7 at 100%. Even in the cupboard, there was just an annoying hum. My new Netgear managed switches are passive so silent. The Ubiquiti just spools up for a short time when it needs.
 

techquest

Well-known Member
Yes unless you're really into the techie side of stuff then a dedicated server is hard to justify, but there's nothing like the real thing and being able to touch and play with the equipment. I agree AWS probably makes sense for those who don't want their own dedicated server and the expense that goes with one.

Looking forward to seeing the list :thumbsup:
 
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mosh

Standard Member
Hey Guys, so here is the list of things i'm looking to buy to complete the home setup. I'm sure I've missed some things off, but feel free to step in please!

1. Starting off with the Rack:

Comms Rack 18U 550x550 Rack - £117.60 + £34.80 Castors = £152.40
-- There doesn't seem to be much choice in blanking plates and shelves (including telescopic), wondered if I can buy some from say Cable Monkey:
+RR-S11 - 450MM Deep Shelf: £19.20
+RR-S1 300MM deep shelf: £14.00
+PDU: Dynamode 6 Way: £18.16
+Cable MGT - Not many on Comms Rack
+24 Port Cat6A Patch Panel - SGF24 : £59.94 (CPC)
+1U Rack fan (x4): £65.99 (CPC)
Sub-Total: £329.59

2. Cabling:
+Belden 6A 305M Reel: £160 (Amazon)
+0.15M patch panel (£1.20 each x 12) = £12 (Cat 6a Patch Cable | RJ45 Ethernet Cable - Shielded 0.15m for Sale
Sub-Total: £172

3. Components:
+ Ubiquiti UniFi Switch 24 250W (US-24-250W): £340
+ Ubiquiti USG Pro 4 Router: £240
+ Ubiquiti Cloud Key G2 Plus: £184.68
+ Ubiquiti UniFi AC SHD: £280
Sub-Total: £1,045

I've left out the Ethernet wall plates but looking for advice on where you buy your RJ45 boots and tools as I want to get the wireless network up first. @t

Thanks!
 

techquest

Well-known Member
Looking good and nothing wrong with any of the spec you've chosen. :thumbsup: Maybe look at Startech for rack fixtures and fittings

Server Rack Accessories | Server Management | StarTech.com

But there are probably loads of other places out there and your okay for standard 19" stuff as you have the 550 wide rack. Wish I could come and play.

Just remember if your going to need to tie in any Cat 6a cables/patch cords use velcro type ties, plastic cable ties can very easily damage the cables/cords.
 
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mickevh

Distinguished Member
You might be able to do better on price for the bulk cable - for example Cable Monkey (no affiliation) have some for around half your price... Cat6a Bulk Cable

Personally, I wouldn't want the hassle of any shielded UTP (whatever it's "cat" - but it tends to be 6A and higher) and save myself the ball-ache of having to strap down all the shielding to earth.

If you want to scare yourself silly about how stringent higher cat installation requirements are, try the following article - though bear mind it is written by professional cable monkeys for professional cable monkeys... Installation Pitfalls in Cat6 Cabling
 

Markr123

Active Member
Shopping list looks pretty good. Only suggestions would be...

1. Lots of choice on blanking plates etc on eBay. I normally use
linxcomuk LinxcomUK | eBay Shops for brush bars and blanks. Have some good 1u temp controlled rack fans too.

2. Cable. Unfamiliar with the Belsen brand. Seeing as you only want to be laying in once and the effort involved, I tend to favour a known brand. Also in a box is much, much easier then a reel I find. I used this CE Cat6 Cable UTP LSOH 4 Pair - 305mt box available... | Comms Express Cost is better too.

3. Ubiquiti. You may find the CloudKey gen2 plus a bit overkill unless you plan to run ubiquiti cameras. I use the basic £70 one at home and second property. Also, you may find the SHD version of the AP overkill too. I have about 4 of the UAP-AC-Pro and find these more than comfortable in serving around 35-40 WiFi devices. If you’ve happy with budget then go for it.

Lastly, don’t forget good quality punchdown tool. Forget the cheap ones. Basic £10 tester will aid you too.
 

techquest

Well-known Member
2. Cable. Unfamiliar with the Belsen brand. Seeing as you only want to be laying in once and the effort involved, I tend to favour a known brand. Also in a box is much, much easier then a reel I find.
It's Belden

Signal Transmission, Connectivity, & Networking Products - Belden


they're only the world leader in cable manufacture. They bought CDT (cable Design Technologies) the best design/manufacturer of cables there ever was.

RS also distribute Brand-Rex (now owned by Leviton) cables and would be a good alternative cable to use

@mosh has listed a 305 mtr drum in his list.

Time and detail is all you need to install shielded. It really isn't much more difficult to deal with than any other Cat type, yes more work due to the shields but such is life installing cables.
 
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Markr123

Active Member
It's Belden

Signal Transmission, Connectivity, & Networking Products - Belden


they're only the world leader in cable manufacture. They bought CDT (cable Design Technologies) the best design/manufacturer of cables there ever was.

RS also distribute Brand-Rex (now owned by Leviton) cables and would be a good alternative cable to use

@mosh has listed a 305 mtr drum in his list.

Time and detail is all you need to install shielded. It really isn't much more difficult to deal with than any other Cat type, yes more work due to the shields but such is life installing cables.

Well, you learn something new everyday. :thumbsup:
 

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