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newbie question regarding impedence

Discussion in 'Home Cinema Speakers' started by billy Z, Sep 21, 2003.

  1. billy Z

    billy Z
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    Hi everyone I am new here and basically a dummy when it comes to this. I bought the Polk Lsi series (Lsi15,LsiC,LsiFX) and they are rated at 4ohms. I have the Denon 5800 AVR whose specs are rated from 6-16ohs with 200W per channel at 6 ohs and 180 at ohms. Would it be safe to run these speakers without tripping the circuit protector? I really do not want to buy a new receiver and I have heard nothing but great stuff about these speakers. Is there anyway I can go around this maybe buy an amp or something? Or put an inline resistor if possible? Thanks again
     
  2. nathan_silly

    nathan_silly
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    You'll be fine. If you had the bottom of the range Denon I would be warey, but yours is top end AV amp..so it'll breeze through it.

    Only way it'll struggle would be with something like Kef Reference 4.4's, Electrostaic's etc.

    Give the amp plenty of space on top for ventilation.

    Just had a look at the back panel :eek: :rotfl:

    [edit] Does the manual say the Denon can drive 4 Ohm speakers?
     
  3. billy Z

    billy Z
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    The manual states: the protector may be activated if the set is played for long periods of time at high volumes when speakers with an impedence of lower than the specified impedence (for example speakers with an impedence of lower than 4 ohms) are connected. If theprotector circuit is activated, the speaker output is cut off. Turn off the set's power, wait for the set to cool down, improve the the ventilation around the set, and turn the unit on.

    So as you can see it does not say to NOT use them. I just don't want to fry the unit
     
  4. nathan_silly

    nathan_silly
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    I would guess the left & right speakers would give the Denon the most trouble.

    If the Polk Lsi15's have seperate terminals for the subwoofer in the bottom of the speaker- why not consider using another amp ( a seperate high output high current) 2 channel poweramp to drive the subs?

    You could set the crossover on the Denon's setup to the L/R's upper section bass handling ability - where the midrange drivers drop off to. Use the Denon for the treble & midrange drivers, then use the .1 LFE subwoofer output into the L/R subwoofers.

    This'll ease the strain on the Denon, plus give better dynamic range overall. It'll also allow you to tailor the output to the subwoofers, ie you could decrease the gain if you find the built-in subs are overpowering.

    How big is your room?
     
  5. Reiner

    Reiner
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    No worries, the protection circuit will exactly avoid that and as long as you keep volume levels reasonable there should be no problem.
     

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