Newbie question re High Def on DVD

captain11

Active Member
Is High Def footage converted and burnt to a normal DVD any improvement to SD footage on DVD?

I am asking as I need to replace my Sony Mini DV camcorder and am unsure whether to get SD or HD.

I realise that SD will soon become obselete but at the moment only have a normal DVD player (as do other family members that I send stuff to) so I am wondering whether to get another SD camcorder now and step up to HD when I have the equipment to play it on.
 

PhilipL

Well-known Member
Hi

In theory yes it should have the edge, in practice it will often look worse.

The problem is that currently not many software packages make a good job of down sizing the HD to SD resolutions, so you can end up with some nasty artefacts and moire effects.

I was extremely disappointed when I converted some HD footage to DVD at the poor quality. While you can often see that a DVD or TV for that matter (such as Doctor Who) came from an HD source even when watching in SD, it takes some pretty sophisticated equipment and software to achieve that sort of quality you see from commercially sourced transfers to SD.

Factor in the hassles of editing AVCHD format video from HD camcorders you may want to stick with SD. However it isn't so much the quality of your video being good enough now in SD, but in the future you may regret not having the master in HD.

Regards

Phil
 

rogs

Well-known Member
When I first had my AVCHD camera, I stored the HD footage in it's original form, and used the supplied camera software (HD Writer) to make Standard Definition Mpeg2 copies, for burning to DVD.

In that particular case, I was quite pleased with the SD results - especially if I used a higher bitrate.
But, as PhilipL says, this is not always the case, and some 'down conversions' are not that good.

What I am pleased about is the decision to store my original footage as HD. Now that I have upgraded my computer, and bought a media player (WDTV), I can watch the original footage in all it's HD glory --and it is very impressive, compared to the SD conversions!!

Of course, you may decide that you are going to upgrade to Blu-ray, rather than going down the media player route, and it is worth remembering that you can burn AVCHD footage to a standad DVD using a standard DVD burner, and replay that disc, in HD, on a Blu-ray player.
What you cannot do is replay that disc on a standard DVD player. It has to be Blu-ray.

I agree with PhilipL, you may regret not 'going HD' at this time, if you have the chance to do so.
 

captain11

Active Member
Interesting. Thanks for replying guys.

A couple of questions if I may:

Is there software that is known to do a better job than others of converting to SD?

Also, If I burn AVCHD to a standard DVD, how much (time wise) can you fit on there? And do you need a particular Blu-ray player to play the AVCHD DVD's or will any of them do it?
 

PhilipL

Well-known Member
Hi

Interesting. Thanks for replying guys.

A couple of questions if I may:

Is there software that is known to do a better job than others of converting to SD?

Also, If I burn AVCHD to a standard DVD, how much (time wise) can you fit on there? And do you need a particular Blu-ray player to play the AVCHD DVD's or will any of them do it?

Corel VideoStudio Pro X3 is out now, that uses the MainConcept encoder and does a reasonable job, plus you get all the editing extras.

If you burn to DVD using AVCHD you get around 20 minutes on a single layer disk. You need a Blu-ray player that supports AVCHD to play it back.

Regards

Phil
 

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