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Newbie Garage conversion - Stud work

Discussion in 'Home Cinema Building DIY' started by jhaworth, Jul 6, 2005.

  1. jhaworth

    jhaworth
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    Hi

    Another garage converion, still in it's early stages. A quick question regarding the stud walling which will line the internal garage walls.
    In order to minimise noise transmission, I plan on using 75mm uprights, with 75mm Kingspan insulation, covered by 12mm ply and then finished with plasterboard.

    Is it ok to screw the 75mm uprights to the garage wall, or should they be fixed at the bottom (to the concrete floor) and at the top to the ceiling, leaving an air gap between the uprights and the brick wall?

    Cheers

    jon
     
  2. Jamiroquai78

    Jamiroquai78
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    Hey Jon welcome aboard :D

    I fixed mine to the concrete floor a couple of inches in from the wall used 4" insulation and double skinned with plasterboard, works a treat, you can't hear nuffin :devil:

    Jam
     
  3. woody67

    woody67
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    Your proposal is fine in respect of the timber battens.

    But with regards to the Kingspan, I would consider Rockwool instead as it is more dense and may provide better sound insulation for the equivalent thickness (or you could use thinner batts and gain some more room)

    But I would also consider boards from the Fermacell range which could save even more space
     
  4. Gary Lightfoot

    Gary Lightfoot
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    Hi Jon,

    Definitely keep them away from the wall by at least an inch as it helps isolation. If you screwed them to the wall you'd make a direct path via the contact for any soundwaves and they'd pass through with little reduction.

    I agree with Woody and the rockwool. The usual method of an inch gap, 4"x2" wood and 4" of rockwool finished with two layers of 1/2" plasterboard (or one 1/2" and one 5/8") is a common method that works well and is relatively cheap as Jam' will testify.

    Gary.
     
  5. Rob100

    Rob100
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    Having just moved, I'm about to embark on my own garage conversion soon (still in early planning stages).

    If you leave a 1" gap between the studwork and the outer wall, how do you stop the rockwool from falling out the back and touching the wall?

    Also, do you need a vapour barier between the studwork and the plasterboard?

    Building isn't my thing (I'm an electrical engineer), although I do consider myself to be more than capable of doing the job with the right advise :)

    Thanks in advance.

    Rob.
     
  6. Gary Lightfoot

    Gary Lightfoot
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    I seem to remember it being said that you should push the rockwool to the back of the stud work so that it can act as a fire barrier and stop any fire travelling behind the wall. If the gap is an inch, and the studwork is 4" then you should be filling the (overall 5") gap with 4" rockwool pushed to the back. It may expand enough to fill the 5" gap anyway.

    I don't think you need a vapour barrier for internal stud walls, but there's no reason why you can't fit some. Hopefully someone will clarify thet though.

    Gary.
     

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