Newbie: Be gentle

PD_BARBS

Active Member
Hello Folks

After a month finally figured out how to point and shoot. So here is some of the shots I have taken using my Canon 400D with the kit lens.

I am interested in any suggestions on composition or processing, as I am a total novice.

Thanks

IMG_4446_3.jpg

IMG_4365_3.jpg
 

IAN P

Distinguished Member
The cottage is definately blurry,otherwise it would have been a decent shot.
 

TarMoo

Well-known Member
The EXIF on the 1st picture is ...

Camera Make: Canon
Camera Model: Canon EOS 400D DIGITAL
Image Date: 2008:05:04 12:57:05
Flash Used: No
Focal Length: 18.0mm
CCD Width: 7.33mm
Exposure Time: 0.077 s (1/13)
Aperture: f/22.0
ISO equiv: 200
White Balance: Auto
Metering Mode: Matrix
Exposure: aperture priority (semi-auto)
Maybe if you had wider aperture - e.g. F11 and a faster shutter speed.

The EXIF on the 2nd picture is ...

Camera Make: Canon
Camera Model: Canon EOS 400D DIGITAL
Image Date: 2008:04:27 16:15:02
Flash Used: No
Focal Length: 28.0mm
CCD Width: 7.33mm
Exposure Time: 0.0031 s (1/320)
Aperture: f/4.0
ISO equiv: 100
White Balance: Auto
Metering Mode: Matrix
Exposure: Portrait Mode

Generally you get good results for portraits at longer than 28mm - maybe 50-100 is good, and if you pick out the subject with the background out of focus then it tends to look better.
 

PD_BARBS

Active Member
Thanks folks

What do you mean by clarity and detail ?

And would sharpening the cottage help, or is it beyond redemption.

All feedback welcome.
 

hot-fuzz

Banned
Thanks folks

What do you mean by clarity and detail ?

And would sharpening the cottage help, or is it beyond redemption.

All feedback welcome.

The composition of the 1st is good and i can echo above, try and get a faster shutter speed.
If you look at the pilon on the rigth you can see its blurred.

Give it another go using a tripod or faster shutter speed.

:smashin:
 

PD_BARBS

Active Member
The composition of the 1st is good and i can echo above, try and get a faster shutter speed.
If you look at the pilon on the rigth you can see its blurred.

Give it another go using a tripod or faster shutter speed.

:smashin:

Great feedback.

With respect to the pilon, if you were processing this, would it be worth removing it.
 

stevegreen

Distinguished Member
Great feedback.

With respect to the pilon, if you were processing this, would it be worth removing it.

I think the telegraph pole holds the shot together as it adds weight to the right hand side. I wouldn't remove it though usually telegraph poles and pylons are not particularly photogenic.

The aperture used on the first is simply too small to allow a decent shutter speed, you can get good depth of field with f/11 and using that would have made the shot hand holdable in these circumstances.

The portrait has potential even though it looks soft, abit of sympathetic processing would bring this out beautifully. Not entiely sure why it's a bit soft though, the shutter was fast enough, maybe a focus problem.
 

Farno

Active Member
on the second photo, it looks like the leaves to the right are pin sharp so you've possible focused on the wrong area.
 

Yandros

Well-known Member
In the first one the aperture is too wide, and the shutter speed too slow. The softness will be partly down to slight camera shake, and partly because of the very small aperture, which starts having a negative effect above about f16. As a rule of thumb, most mere mortals can hand hold at a shutter speeds of 1/(effective focal length). That means that for the top photo, at 18mm, you would need 1/(1.6x18), which round up to about 1/30th second (the 1.6 is the magnification factor inherent in the 400D body). So, to cut a long story short, as Rasputin said, an aperture of f11 and the corresponding higher shutter speed would've given you a sharp shot.

The eyes in the second pic are slightly out of focus. Look at the strands of hair to the right, and you'll see they're in perfect focus. In this case your aperture is very wide, meaning your depth of field is shallow, and you have to be super careful with focussing. Again, I have to agree with Rasputin - use a slightly longer focal length for portraits.
 

PD_BARBS

Active Member
Folks

Once again thanks for the excellent tips. There still alot to learn.

The processed picture looks much better thanks.
 

TarMoo

Well-known Member
Some other pointers for portraits ....
  1. Shooting portraits - have a separation between the subject and background allows the background to be blurred.
  2. Taking outdoor portraits is difficult in direct sunlight as shadows one one side of the face or under the eyes makes the picture look bad. When the light is diffused - early morning or at dusk, or if your subject is in the shade gives a better result.
  3. A dedicated flash is very handy for indoor shots. I use bounced flash a lot where you point the flash unit up at the ceiling.
 

Barbs

Active Member
You're a brave man posting for public criticism this early on. I have looked at some of the efforts of the folks on here and compared to what I am churning out at the moment I have a long way to go before I will even try and post my efforts for advice.

Love the second shot .... but then again it is my favourite niece :D .. (don't tell the other 2 :rolleyes:).
 

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