New Ubiquiti Home Network

ptammaro_3

Active Member
Ok so an update... I’m failing at the first hurdle.

I plug in the Draytek and there appears to be a DSL connection. Solid green light and router is syncing at 79mbps. I then plugged in UDM Pro and it doesn’t detect an internet connection. Im not entirely sure if the issue is with the Draytek or the UDM Pro. For reference my ISP is IDNet and all there settings should be pulled from PPPoE. What I found odd though is that there was nowhere to enter my username and password in the Draytek but there was on the UDM Pro. Either way still no internet connection.

Read in a few places to do a hard reset followed by a SSH firmware update. I can SSH into the UDM Pro fine but since I can’t access the internet I can’t force it download the firmware from Ubiquiti. I then downloaded the firmware from Ubiquiti manually but couldn’t figure out he command to install from hard disk rather than the internet.

Any advice anyone?
 

Puntoboy

Well-known Member
Plug the internet in as normal. Then connect the UDM-Pro to the original router via the WAN port.

Set up the UDMP as DHCP internet connection, your exiting router will give it an IP then you should be able to update. Then factory reset it and remove the old router.
 

ptammaro_3

Active Member
Ok a further update.

@Puntoboy thanks for the advice I managed to connect to internet using the my Netgear D7800 and update the firmware by doing what you suggested.

After that I unplugged the Netgear and factory reset the UDM Pro. Plugged in the Draytek 130 (solid DSL light on it so it has synced to the line). Followed the on screen Ubiquiti instructions and got no internet connection. Went into advanced options, selected PPPoE as the connection and entered my ISP username and password along with the VLAN ID and hit next. Still got the same result - no internet connection.

Am I missing something?
 

ptammaro_3

Active Member
Another update.

To test the Draytek I’ve directly attached it to my laptop and created a network through Windows. I can confirm the modem works using my ISP credentials.

It’s when the UDM-Pro gets thrown into the mix it’s doesn’t pick up a connection. I can also confirm I’m now running v1.7 of the firmware too.

I’m stuck...
 

ptammaro_3

Active Member
Never
Another update.

To test the Draytek I’ve directly attached it to my laptop and created a network through Windows. I can confirm the modem works using my ISP credentials.

It’s when the UDM-Pro gets thrown into the mix it’s doesn’t pick up a connection. I can also confirm I’m now running v1.7 of the firmware too.

I’m stuck...
Nevermind! Literally just connected!
 

sparkymark75

Well-known Member
I had the USG3, moved to using an EdgeRouter 4 with all my other UniFi gear. Was interested in the UDM line but it doesn't support multicast relaying which means my IoT/Sonos gear on a different VLAN from my phone, etc won't work. Hanging off for the UXG line of products which they've promised will be feature comparable with the USG line.
 

Puntoboy

Well-known Member
I had the USG3, moved to using an EdgeRouter 4 with all my other UniFi gear. Was interested in the UDM line but it doesn't support multicast relaying which means my IoT/Sonos gear on a different VLAN from my phone, etc won't work. Hanging off for the UXG line of products which they've promised will be feature comparable with the USG line.
I'm pretty sure the UDM-Pro does but I could be wrong.
 

sparkymark75

Well-known Member

ptammaro_3

Active Member
Does anyone know how to access the Draytek with the UDM-Pro in the mix? I type in the IP but I get directed straight to Unifi instead of the Draytek login page?
 

ptammaro_3

Active Member
Yes the Draytek is my modem feeding the WAN of the UDM-Pro. When I try to access the modem through 192.168.2.1, which should be the Drayteks web interface, it doesn’t work.

I’d like to check the sync speed of my line (this doesn’t seem to available in UniFi unless I’m missing it) and a couple other modem settings.
 

Puntoboy

Well-known Member
So just so I am clear with your setup :)

Draytek previous network range is 192.168.2.1. So before the UDMP was installed your devices would get an IP address on the 192.168.2.x range?

The UDMP now connects to the the Draytek and your WAPs and other devices connect to the UDMP? What range are they using?

What's the internal IP of the UDMP?
 

ptammaro_3

Active Member
So just so I am clear with your setup :)

Draytek previous network range is 192.168.2.1. So before the UDMP was installed your devices would get an IP address on the 192.168.2.x range?

The UDMP now connects to the the Draytek and your WAPs and other devices connect to the UDMP? What range are they using?

What's the internal IP of the UDMP?
 

ptammaro_3

Active Member
UDM Pro LAN IP is 192.168.1.1 and devices connected to it fall under 192.168.1.x.

I’m not entirely sure how I’m supposed to access the modem now.
 

Puntoboy

Well-known Member
Oh. That kind makes sense and hence why you can't connect to the Draytek. Does your UDMP have PPPoE configured on the WAN port then?
 

Puntoboy

Well-known Member
That'll be why you can't connect to the Draytek then. The PPPoE just passes through it, so as far as the UDMP is concerned, the 192.168.2.x range is itself.
 

mickevh

Distinguished Member
You may need to set up something on the UDM called a "static route" in the routing table so it's routing engine knows where to direct traffic to get the the modem. And permit the replies "back the other way" from the modem to your LAN.

At the moment, (I guess) your UDM "knows" that any traffic to a 192.168.1.X address should be despatched to the "Internal" interface and anything else should be dispatched through "external" (WAN) interface. (called the "default route" often described as address 0.0.0.0) This is typical for a SOHO router.

A wrinkle comes in that a lot of routers "know" that certain IP address ranges are invalid on the public Internet and automatically drop them. ie, anything 10.0.0.0/24 172.16.0.0 thru 172.31.255.255 and anything 192.168.0.0 thru 192.168.255.255 (these are called "private IP addresses.")

The firewall engine might be blocking it too.

So you'll need to "tell" the UDM that 192.168.2.1 is reached through the WAN interface using the aforementioned static route, then check out that the firewall doesn't block it either.

Then the modem needs to "know" how to direct the return traffic. If the UDM will allow it, I'd bind a second IP address to the WAN interface in the 192.168.2.X range (there's no problem binding multiple IP addresses to an interface, albeit that cheap SOHO kit often lacks the ability) and configure the modem with an appropriate default gateway so that it know how to reach it. Finally, you may then need another firewall change so the UDM permits traffic inbound on the external interface from 192.168.2.X to 192.168.1.X - ordinarily a router would never expect any traffic from the private IP address to be delivered inbound on the WAN interface as it should never be possible, so many will block/drop it. Again, you'll need to puncture that to allow traffic from your modem back across the UDM into your LAN.

This is all very doable with the right equipment mix and configuration - whether SOHO gear can achieve it is another matter. I doubt the typical cheap ISP router would, but something a bit more up market like Draytek and UDM (not that I've used either) might be OK.
 
Last edited:

ptammaro_3

Active Member
Thanks for the input guys.

Seems overly complicated to do what I’m asking though. I would’ve thought this would be standard fair with this type of gear!
 

Puntoboy

Well-known Member
Not really. In a lot of enterprise networks, the modem is owned by the telco so the end user doesn’t have access to it. Their demarcation point is the router, so the UDMP in your case.
 

mickevh

Distinguished Member
One of the "threat vectors" that SOHO kit is designed to protect you from out of the box, is malformed IP packets "from" private IP addresses, hence they are often dropped/blocked by default. For SOHO users that's a great protection to have out of the box for zero effort and it's simple to pre-configure.

Making decisions about what traffic to route from where to where and by what route is what "routers" do. Setting them up according to the desired design is how professional network managers earn their money.

What you are trying to achieve is akin to what pros do configuring routers rather than the simple "get you on the Internet" use case, so you've got to put in the work to make it happen like a network manager rather that just slap it in, turn it on and it all "just works" like a SOHO get-you-on-the-Internet router.

Settig up some routing and appropriate IP addressing is not something an IT pro would find difficult, it's basically their bread an butter, but if you are new to all this, then it can certainly seem daunting simply because it's different to anything you've encountered previously. Suffice to say there isn't going to be some one-click "JFDI" button that will do it all for you - you've going to need to understand a bit about IP routing, IP addressing and how to configure your kit accordingly (if it can) to get there.
 

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