New Ubiquiti Home Network

ptammaro_3

Active Member
Hello all,

Looking for some advice...

I’ve pretty much decided to upgrade my home network to something a little bit more powerful and I’ve been researching the Ubiquiti Unifi line of products. Based on what I’ve researched they seem to be reliable, well reviewed and perform very well.

Over the next few days I plan to place an order for the following products to get me started...

  • Unifi Dream Machine Pro
  • Unifi USW-Pro-48-POE Gen 2
  • UniFi nanoHD
  • Draytek Vigor 130 modem
The switch is large but I’ve already maxed out my 24 port Netgear switch and since Id like to keep everything Ubiquiti then I’ve opted for the larger switch to allow for a bit of expansion down the line.

So my questions are,

  • Given that I’ve opted for the UDM Pro then I think I’ve got all the bases covered to get me up and running?
  • I’ve read of a few setup issues with UDM Pro - does anyone have personal experience with in doing a new set up rather than trying to port over existing settings from an already running Ubiquiti network?
  • I stay in a 2 bedroom flat of a decent size (sorry not sure of the square footage off the top of my head) - do you think one nanoHD, centrally located, enough to give me full coverage?
  • I’ve got a Qnap TVS872XT with thunderbolt and 10GBASE-T. Is there a way I can connect this to the switch using one of the SFP ports?
Thanks
 

mushii

Distinguished Member
1. Yes
2. Others can comment
3. Probably / Maybe hard to know without seeing it. Foil backed plasterboard, boilers, radiators, RSJs, gym equipment, local RF sources, radar near airports, local cell towers, Tetra, neighbours WiFi etc etc can all impact on WiFi performance. What is your current WiFi performance like?
 

ptammaro_3

Active Member
1. Yes
2. Others can comment
3. Probably / Maybe hard to know without seeing it. Foil backed plasterboard, boilers, radiators, RSJs, gym equipment, local RF sources, radar near airports, local cell towers, Tetra, neighbours WiFi etc etc can all impact on WiFi performance. What is your current WiFi performance like?
I’ve got a Netgear Nighthawk D7800 hidden in the cupboard along with all my other equipment. It’s ok and get a signal in the my bedroom which is the furthest away part of the flat but the running speed tests i lose more than half the speed. I’m hoping by mounting the AP in the hallway which literally in the centre of the property that I can hopefully address that drop in speed.
 

Puntoboy

Well-known Member
48 ports in a 2 bedroom flat! Tha'ts some network. The USW-Pro-48 PoE would be ideal for me if I had everything centralised but at £1000 it's just too expensive. I've been looking recently and UB literally have nothing less than £500 with SFP+ ports. I really want to stick with UB but that's just too much to spend when the likes of Mikrotik have similar devices for hundreds less.

I do have the UDM-Pro however and I've found it to be very reliable with my imported config from my old controller. I use it with a UAP-HD in my 1500sqft house and it's gives good coverage across the entire house over 2 floors.
 

ptammaro_3

Active Member
Haha yes. But, in all fairness, I bought the flat as a new build and had them wire Cat6 cable throughout - 4 connections per room in 2 bedrooms, living room, kitchen. Then I have a various number of devices plugged into the switch just now (plus all the ones in my router) in the AV cupboard. It’s crazy how quickly it’s scaled it 5 years!

I’m not really sure I have a need for SFP at the moment unless I can use it with my NAS. I might need an SFP network card unless I can convert the 10Gb port to SFP. However I’m sure once I move into a proper house I’ll no doubt have to get another switch and could connect them that way.
 

Puntoboy

Well-known Member
What's he connection on the QNAP? RJ-45 or SFP?

I'd recommend getting a DAC cable to connect the switch to the UDM-Pro.
 

psychopomp1

Member
I’ve got a Netgear Nighthawk D7800 hidden in the cupboard along with all my other equipment. It’s ok and get a signal in the my bedroom which is the furthest away part of the flat but the running speed tests i lose more than half the speed. I’m hoping by mounting the AP in the hallway which literally in the centre of the property that I can hopefully address that drop in speed.
Putting a wifi router/AP in an enclosed space such as a cupboard or TV cabinet is just about the worst place to put any wifi emitting device. Chances are as soon as you move your existing router out in the open - doesn't have to bang centre in the home - your wifi coverage magically improves. Just trying to save you some cash because the D7800 is based on the best Netgear router for wifi (R7800) but with a adsl/vdsl modem bolted on. The R7800 tops the router charts on smallnetbuilder.com for wifi range/coverage.
 

ptammaro_3

Active Member
Putting a wifi router/AP in an enclosed space such as a cupboard or TV cabinet is just about the worst place to put any wifi emitting device. Chances are as soon as you move your existing router out in the open - doesn't have to bang centre in the home - your wifi coverage magically improves. Just trying to save you some cash because the D7800 is based on the best Netgear router for wifi (R7800) but with a adsl/vdsl modem bolted on. The R7800 tops the router charts on smallnetbuilder.com for wifi range/coverage.
Yip totally aware it’s not ideal However moving it out isnt really an option unfortunately. Everything is wired into the cupboard including the master socket and running extra cable out wouldn’t look great to be honest.

With the AP I can pretty easily run an extra cat6 cable out the cupboard, into the loft and pop it out in the ceiling of the hallway.
 

a5ian300zx

Well-known Member
What you going to use the 10gbe on?

the gen2 switch has 10g uplink ports to connect to other core switches/distribution switches and you cannot use them like like a standard 10g from what i remember.

I have a qnap with 10g rj45 but only use my computer with it when working on media and transferring so hence I just use slim rj45 cable and connect it direct to my PC 10g rg45 network card to the Qnaps (both are Intel nic) and setup static IP addresses on both its cheap and straightforward.

if you do 10g then a lot of the items need to follow the same 10g eg PC's / servers etc.. but as you know majority of the stuff is 1gb anyway so you will be restricted to those speeds.

If i can revisit my setup i should have gone with SFP 10g cards instead as it reduces overheads and latency, but for me its good enough right now.

my setup consist of.
  • Unifi Cloud Key Gen2 Controller
  • Unifi USW-24-POE Gen 2
  • UniFi nanoHD + AC Pro
  • Draytek Vigor VDSL Router
  • Qnap TVS871 with 10g Network card.

I setup a standard dream machine for my nephew and it cured his WIFI issues in his house.

FYI: If you have a Virgin 500meg or above connection that the standard dream machine can handle around 800meg for FW data so you speed wont be restricted and dream machine pro can handle 1gb on FW.
 

mushii

Distinguished Member
???? I am totally lost....
 

mushii

Distinguished Member
Dont try and plug everything in at once. Set up your Draytek and UDM First. Then add your switch and finally your Nano. Let everything update between adding the next components. otherwise you will be in a world of pain.
 

ptammaro_3

Active Member
Dont try and plug everything in at once. Set up your Draytek and UDM First. Then add your switch and finally your Nano. Let everything update between adding the next components. otherwise you will be in a world of pain.
:rotfl:

That doesn’t sound very reassuring!
 

mushii

Distinguished Member
Honestly, if you have 4 devices all trying to update themselves all all at the same time, its easy for them to fall out of sync with one-another. Trying to recover from that can be harder than you imagine and often requires everything factory re-setting. Just install one thing at a time, let it do its thing then add the next component in the chain, rinse and repeat. Its standard SOP for installing any network based technology.
 

ptammaro_3

Active Member
Honestly, if you have 4 devices all trying to update themselves all all at the same time, its easy for them to fall out of sync with one-another. Trying to recover from that can be harder than you imagine and often requires everything factory re-setting. Just install one thing at a time, let it do its thing then add the next component in the chain, rinse and repeat. Its standard SOP for installing any network based technology.
Ok noted. My delivery is scheduled for the 4th June - guess what I’m doing next weekend...
 

ptammaro_3

Active Member
This maybe a silly question but I’m still getting my head around this networking stuff. My current gear doesn’t support SFP so I’ve not really been bothered about it before however now that all the Ubiquiti gear I’ve ordered does is this the best way to connect the UDM Pro to the switch?

I assume so, so what cable and transceivers do I need to get?
 

mickevh

Distinguished Member
SFP is a tranceiver, not the hookup. It's a nice way for the manufacturer to have the same port on a piece of equipment avail multiple cable types and/or speeds without having to create different versions of the same box for different media. (It also gives us some future flexibility - image I hook up using copper ethernet, then in future put in a fibre link - instead of having to throw away the box, I just change to a different SFP tranceiver and off we go - (reality may be more complex than that for other reasons.))

So for example, there might be an SFP port in a box than can accept either a UTP or a fibre gigabit ethernet tranceiver and you just pick whatever is appropriate for the cabling you are installing. It doesn't matter what's "the other end" of the cable you thence attach to - it could be a "normal" (fixed) UTP or fibre (as appropriate) ethenet port or some other box that has it's own SFP port (or other things such as GBIC which was popular years ago that did a similar thing.)

So if your current gear is (say) gigabit ethernet over UTP, then you run a UTP cable between them and get yourself a gigabit (or 10GBe or whatever) ethernet SFP transciever suitable for the UDM SFP port. Though do check the spec of the UDM to see what tranceivers it's SFP port can support - if it's SFP port is (say) 10Gbe only, there's no point putting a 1Gbe SFP tranceiver in it (it won't work) and/or hooking up to a gigabit switch the other end.
 
Last edited:

gtsbaby

Well-known Member
Ok noted. My delivery is scheduled for the 4th June - guess what I’m doing next weekend...
My UDM Pro arrives on the 3rd June. New to this kind of thing also so will be watching this thread with eagle eyes.
 

ptammaro_3

Active Member
So just took delivery of all the Ubiquiti gear a day early. Went to plug in the the UDM-Pro and realised my Dell XPS13 has no ethernet port so can't attached the laptop to set it up.

I've now ordered a usb-c to ethernet adapter from Amazon.

I'll need to wait till tomorrow now - FML
 

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