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New to DSLR

rcaudwell

Prominent Member
Evening all, looking for a bit of advice, complete newbe to DSLR, have had a Canon Powershot S3 IS for the last 3-4 years which seems to have developed a bit of a fault - all the pics come out sl on an angle (could just be me but I don`t think so!) - could get it fixed I suppose, but am sensing the opportunity for a new toy purchase ;) Have played with some of the options on the S3, and was thinking I may as well bite the bullet and go for a "proper" DSLR, which will be used for the usual selection of family parties, holidays etc. Don`t know to much about photography but hoping to learn, so need something relatively easy to get to grips with, budget about £500. Was hoping for some ideas as to what I should be looking at. Been looking at models such as the Nikon D500 - is this the kind of thing that would suit me or am I barking up the wrong tree? Thanks
 

shotokan101

Banned
Hi - the usual first advice is to get down o a local camear store and handle the models in your approximate price range from the major manufacturers such as Canon-Nikon-Sony-Panasonic-Olympus etc.

Most manufacturers will have a model withing your budget and generally speaking the features and specifications will be "similar" so get your hands on them and see how they look and feel to you regarding button placement - grip - weight etc.

You then probably need to decide on whether features such as Liveview (using LCD display as focusing/composition aid like a compact camera) and senso based image stabilisation vs lens based stbilisation etc. matter to you and narrow the choices down and firm up your budget.

What sort of photography do you see yourself doing ?

Jim
 

TonyH

Established Member
Evening all, looking for a bit of advice, complete newbe to DSLR, have had a Canon Powershot S3 IS for the last 3-4 years which seems to have developed a bit of a fault - all the pics come out sl on an angle (could just be me but I don`t think so!) - could get it fixed I suppose, but am sensing the opportunity for a new toy purchase ;) Have played with some of the options on the S3, and was thinking I may as well bite the bullet and go for a "proper" DSLR, which will be used for the usual selection of family parties, holidays etc. Don`t know to much about photography but hoping to learn, so need something relatively easy to get to grips with, budget about £500. Was hoping for some ideas as to what I should be looking at. Been looking at models such as the Nikon D500 - is this the kind of thing that would suit me or am I barking up the wrong tree? Thanks


There is a free (manufacturing fault) fix for Canon cameras with a faulty sensor, dunno if yours falls into this catagory. Try searching this forum im sure its been mentioned, im also sure google will throw something up. Will give you some spending money if you discover this information after getting the DSLR ;)
 

rcaudwell

Prominent Member
What sort of photography do you see yourself doing ?

Fairly wide variety; holidays, family gatherings etc. No intention of doing portrait type photos, studios etc.

Looks like I will get myself down to the camera shop and have a play, just really wanted to check there weren`t any major things I should be looking for, models to avoid/standout models in the price range.
 

shotokan101

Banned
Hi - I was just askig about the "type" of photography in case it would highlight specific features or lens requirements - e.g. longer telephoto if doing wildlife shots. or faster continuous shooting rate for sports photography etc.

From what you say and of the Basic/Intermediate models with a standard Kit lens should fit your bill I guess and it's all really down to which one feels best in your hands IMO :)

Let us know what you decide :smashin:

JIm
 

derek1971

Prominent Member
If it is any help i have just got my first dslr. After much deliberation i plumped for the Nikon D5000 and am very happy with it.

Main reason i chose it over the equivalent Sony/Canon/Pentax etc was that i have access to Nikon fit lenses (as my old man also has a Nikon).

Only downside i can see to it is that it is going to be a constant money drain given the amout of lenses/other accessories i now find myself wanting:rotfl:

On that point you should consider if you are going to be looking to get additional lenses any time soon and check out the prices of those too. The D5000 does not have in body auto focus so you need to get lenses with motors built in - not a problem but they do tend to be a little more expensive.:smashin:
 

rcaudwell

Prominent Member
Funny you should say that, pretty much decided on a D5000 myself. Found out last night a mate has a D3000 and like the interface etc, which I believe is much the same, so will go for a D5000 to get the video functions. Will probably leave it a couple of months and see what kind of deal I can get, seen it for about £475 with lens and don`t really need it til summer, so hoping to get about April/May to give time for some practice.
 

arthurdentpc

Established Member
Fairly wide variety; holidays, family gatherings etc. No intention of doing portrait type photos, studios etc.
You say that now. Once you've got used to the SLR there'll be no end to your photography projects :thumbsup:

When you're looking at a budget of £500, don't forget the cost of extra lenses / etc. Maybe better to buy a bit cheaper body and have cash left over for other stuff than to go to your limits. Just a thought. Personally, fwiw, I'm very happy with my first DSLR - Nikon D40.
 
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partyweirdo

Standard Member
Just be careful you don't limit yourself. I bought a D40 with kit lens and traded it in within 6 months.

I'm no pro, but the D40 is restricting (apart from the lack of pixels). Changing ISO settings (something you'll do alot when you're into it) is a real pain on the D40 - you have to actually go right into the menu.

You can pick up a used D90 with 18-105mm VR lens for around £600 if you look hard. Totally worth the extra.

Very happy with mine.
 

rcaudwell

Prominent Member
Thanks for the advice guys, have wobbled slightly on my D5000 decision already, and have been looking at the classifieds on here, which seems to have quite a good selection of 1-2yr or so old, well looked after cameras, and I`m beginning to think I`d get more for my money going that way. Main problem is I`m not sure where each of the models sit in the respective ranges, D40/D90, EOS 450 etc etc, and as most are prev years models they aren`t on the manufacturer`s website. Anyone have a comparison site I can compare stuff against?
The D5000 i`ve seen comes with a 18-55 lens, apologies for what may be a slightly philistine question but what is that equivalent to in terms of zoom? (ie my S3 has 12x zoom, which I realise this isn`t going to be anywhere near btw)
 

partyweirdo

Standard Member
I believe 200mm is equivalant to 10x zoom.

D40 is no longer made, but it was the entry level camera. The d90 is mid range - semipro if you like.

I found the 18-55 a little restricting with regards to zoom, this is why I bought the 18-200 (which I now use on the d90). Kit lens with d90 is 18-105mm, which is a great all the time lens.

This all said, you can get some great pictures from the d40 and you'd have leftover cash for either a wide angle lens or a tripod, filters and decent bag.
 

Crafty

Prominent Member
Thanks for the advice guys, have wobbled slightly on my D5000 decision already, and have been looking at the classifieds on here, which seems to have quite a good selection of 1-2yr or so old, well looked after cameras, and I`m beginning to think I`d get more for my money going that way. Main problem is I`m not sure where each of the models sit in the respective ranges, D40/D90, EOS 450 etc etc, and as most are prev years models they aren`t on the manufacturer`s website. Anyone have a comparison site I can compare stuff against?
The D5000 i`ve seen comes with a 18-55 lens, apologies for what may be a slightly philistine question but what is that equivalent to in terms of zoom? (ie my S3 has 12x zoom, which I realise this isn`t going to be anywhere near btw)

"Zoom" is the range in the focal length of the lens, so 18-55 = x2 "zoom"

Compacts and bridge cameras have a much wider focal length than SLR lenses, whilst they are good its sort of "jack of all trades, master of none".

If you had an 18-55 and something like a 70-300 it'd probably do 99% of what you are after.

Why don't you consider a Canon? the controls will be the same or similar to your S3 and there is probably still a wider range of lenses.
Get a 450D (or 500D if you want video) with the kit lens and a 55-250 (£190 at the moment) and you'll be set I reckon.

Shame you weren't looking a month or so ago, prices seem to of gone up about £10% just recently.
 

arthurdentpc

Established Member
I'm no pro, but the D40 is restricting (apart from the lack of pixels). Changing ISO settings (something you'll do alot when you're into it) is a real pain on the D40 - you have to actually go right into the menu.
Not strictly true - pressing the i button brings up the main shooting settings and you can change ISO there quite quickly. Or you can set ISO to be the function button (I keep WB on mine) so you can change it with one button press. Also, the 6MP is only restricting if you're going to blow up prints bigger than A3 or so ......
I love my D40, sure I might get a better camera body at some point in the future if I get a bit more serious about photography but for learning how to use a DSLR and getting some decent pics it's great value :thumbsup:
 
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rcaudwell

Prominent Member
"Zoom" is the range in the focal length of the lens, so 18-55 = x2 "zoom"

Why don't you consider a Canon? the controls will be the same or similar to your S3 and there is probably still a wider range of lenses.
Get a 450D (or 500D if you want video) with the kit lens and a 55-250 (£190 at the moment) and you'll be set I reckon.

Shame you weren't looking a month or so ago, prices seem to of gone up about £10% just recently.

Only reason is the Canon S3 I have at the moment had to go in for the LCD screen to be repaired (stopped working) under warranty, and now has another fault where all the photos are sl crooked. Totally illogical I know but has put me off buying another.

I have a 3-4 of months to look so hoping prices might fall slightly.
 

Deleted member 446379

Only reason is the Canon S3 I have at the moment had to go in for the LCD screen to be repaired (stopped working) under warranty, and now has another fault where all the photos are sl crooked. Totally illogical I know but has put me off buying another.

I have a 3-4 of months to look so hoping prices might fall slightly.

Don't be put off Canon. I've had several (and now have a G9 and 40D) and have never had any issues. My advice is buy the very best you can afford, and if one is just out orf reach, wait a few weeks and find the extra. Don't be tempted to buy a budget model too quickly.:thumbsdow
 

shotokan101

Banned
Don't be put off Canon. I've had several (and now have a G9 and 40D) and have never had any issues. My advice is buy the very best you can afford, and if one is just out orf reach, wait a few weeks and find the extra. Don't be tempted to buy a budget model too quickly.:thumbsdow

Interesting viewpoint - most experienced folk here seem to recommend "economising" on the body and buying the best lens you can when entering the DSLR market if on a tight budget and upgrading the Body as finances allow and you outgrow it's capabilities.

Don't forget "entry-level" DSLRs these days are a far cry from those a few years ago in terms of their specification and abilities.

Jim
 

Deleted member 446379

Interesting viewpoint - most experienced folk here seem to recommend "economising" on the body and buying the best lens you can when entering the DSLR market if on a tight budget and upgrading the Body as finances allow and you outgrow it's capabilities.

Don't forget "entry-level" DSLRs these days are a far cry from those a few years ago in terms of their specification and abilities.

Jim

Well put it this way. I am so glad I went for the 40D rather than the 400 or 450 which was available at the time.:)
 

shotokan101

Banned
Well put it this way. I am so glad I went for the 40D rather than the 400 or 450 which was available at the time.:)

I'm sure you are and I'm glad you're happy with what you bought :) - I was merely observing the interesting difference in opinion ;)

Jim
 

Deleted member 446379

I'm sure you are and I'm glad you're happy with what you bought :) - I was merely observing the interesting difference in opinion ;)

Jim

Yes I realize that and I respect that opinion. It is an interesting subject, but I guess it usually comes down to the individual. For example, for someone wishing to shoot action sports, the fps rate may be very important, so more emphasis would perhaps be placed on the body. My point was more of a general one, and could also be related to lenses as well. The main thrust of my point is, think carefully before buying and refrain from rushing out and making do with what you can afford right now, without considering what you may wish you had done after it's too late! That said, DSLRs and lenses seem to hold their value very well, so changes can be made after a relatively short period of time without loosing too much. I paid £299 for the 100mm Canon macro two years ago, and £639 for the 24 - 105 L. I can't see me loosing very much on those should I want to sell them (not that I would:rolleyes:). Even my 40D would probably fetch >£400, and I paid £529. In electrical goods terms, that's not a bad loss.:cool:
 

mark1000

Distinguished Member
To OP, you may well like to have a look at the Panasonic G1, it stands shoulder to shoulder with the other DSLR brands and IMO you would feel right at home with this model with its live view EVF, you can get the starter kit for under £450 and add the 45-200mm kit lens for around £200 later which will give you a range of 28mm to 400mm plus you can get even further with the EZ mode pushing the range right out to 860mm.

Have a look at part one of the popular thread for links to reviews and galleries.

http://www.avforums.com/forums/photo-sharing/913765-panasonic-g1-gallery-come-have-look.html

You can also find part two links on the last page of part one.

Hope that gives you a bit more choice.

Mark.


EDIT....just found that Mather's are doing the kit deal for £389 after the £50 cash back deal.

link.

http://www.mathersoflancashire.co.uk/page85.html
 
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rcaudwell

Prominent Member
Hadn`t considered the panasonic, but looks good. Mathers isn`t too far from me, might go and have a look at the weekend.
 

jenam93

Prominent Member
I am also looking at getting into DSLR photography. Is it worth getting a second hand Canon 30D (usually go for £200 to £250 on ebay) or are the newer entry level cameras better than the 30D.

Would mainly be doing indoor photography of my kids with it.

Thanks

Jon
 

rcaudwell

Prominent Member
Perhaps a little off topic, but relevant to my decision - I accept that I`ll never get the same level of "zoom" with a DSLR lens (especially the kit ones) as with a smaller point and shoot camera unless I really splash out on lenses, but can you zoom in on an area of a picture with photoshop or similar and produce acceptable results (ie looking like tha image is what was photographed, not a blurry, zoomed version) with a 10 or 12 megapixel image?
 

shotokan101

Banned
Perhaps a little off topic, but relevant to my decision - I accept that I`ll never get the same level of "zoom" with a DSLR lens (especially the kit ones) as with a smaller point and shoot camera unless I really splash out on lenses, but can you zoom in on an area of a picture with photoshop or similar and produce acceptable results (ie looking like tha image is what was photographed, not a blurry, zoomed version) with a 10 or 12 megapixel image?

Yes you can - of course the more you "crop" the shot - i.e. the smaller the area of the original you select will affect how large you could print the area of interest without noticeable effect.

Jim
 

Deleted member 446379

Perhaps a little off topic, but relevant to my decision - I accept that I`ll never get the same level of "zoom" with a DSLR lens (especially the kit ones) as with a smaller point and shoot camera unless I really splash out on lenses, but can you zoom in on an area of a picture with photoshop or similar and produce acceptable results (ie looking like tha image is what was photographed, not a blurry, zoomed version) with a 10 or 12 megapixel image?

This basically comes down to cropping, and the smaller the crop area, the more zooming in you are doing (which also depends on your final output size). You obviously can't go any more than 100% otherwise you are basically digitally zooming which is a real no no.

So the three main points to consider are:
1) Quality of lens / picture taken.
2) Original size.
3) Required crop size.
 

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