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New Sky Hi Def Info......

Discussion in 'Televisions' started by whiteswan, Mar 9, 2005.

  1. whiteswan

    whiteswan
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    Hi

    Not been able to get on here for a while now. Still loving the 46" Tosh !!

    Hope u r all well.....I have had a quick scan through the first few pages and didnt see this posted - so sorry if it is a dupe.

    "Sky delivers extensive official update on its high def plans - including first snippets about its HD receiver

    Following, verbatim, is the information we’ve just received direct from Sky concerning its upcoming high definition services. Much of the content merely confirms what we’ve covered in various previous news stories, but there’s some tantalising new info on the Sky HD receiver box…

    ”WHEN IS SKY LAUNCHING HDTV?
    * Sky is on track to launch a High Definition Television (HDTV) service in 2006.

    * Sky's HDTV channel line-up will include a combination of sports, movies, entertainment and documentary programming. Full details will be announced in due course.

    * Pricing details will be announced in due course.

    WHAT BENEFITS WILL HDTV DELIVER?
    * HDTV offers a step change in picture quality, delivering a home viewing experience similar to that offered in cinemas.

    * Viewers will see greater depth and tone of colours and textures. The improved clarity of HDTV broadcasts will bring an even greater sense of excitement and drama to a wide range of programme genres.

    * HDTV can provide more than four times more data on a display screen than a Standard Definition broadcast. This is because of the increased picture resolution that HD broadcasts deliver and HD display devices will be able to deliver.

    * Pictures are delivered in widescreen format.

    WHAT KIND OF TV SET WILL YOU NEED TO RECEIVE SKY'S HDTV SERVICE?
    * Any kind of screen or TV set could be connected to Sky's HD STB but, to truly experience Sky's HDTV picture quality, customers will need a 26" or larger "HD Ready" plasma, LCD or DLP TV.

    HOW MUCH WILL SKY'S HDTV SERVICE COST?
    * Pricing details for Sky's HDTV service will be announced in due course.

    WHAT DOES "HD READY" MEAN?
    * "HD Ready" is a labelling scheme that is being introduced by the TV manufacturer's organisation EICTA. The "HD Ready" logo will appear on an increasing number of TV displays in shops over the coming months. Any TV set that carries the "HD Ready" label will work with Sky's HDTV service.

    WHAT KIND OF DIGITAL TV RECEIVER WILL YOU NEED TO RECEIVE SKY'S HDTV SERVICE?
    * Sky is introducing a new HDTV receiver that will initially be manufactured by Thomson.

    * The receiver will feature a similar Personal Video Recorder capability to the existing Sky+ box**, enabling viewers to easily record and re-play programmes without video tapes. (** PVR capability will require a Sky+ subscription.)

    HOW WILL SKY'S HDTV RECEIVER CONNECT TO THE TV DISPLAY?
    * The receiver will have an HDMI connector (High Definition Multimedia Interface) as its primary means of connecting to an HD display. HDMI can also be connected to DVI equipped displays using a suitable adapter cable.

    * Most HDTV content will be protected by HDCP (High-bandwidth Digital Content Protection). This means most HDTV content will only be able to be viewed on display devices that have HDCP software built into them.

    WHAT FORMAT WILL SKY'S HDTV SYSTEM USE?
    * Sky 's HDTV broadcasting system and HDTV receiver will support two HDTV formats: 720 / P / 50 (Progressively Scanned picture) and 1080 / I / 25 (Interlaced picture)

    * Sky believes the progressively scanned picture format is better suited for the delivery and viewing of HD content on large screen, flat panel displays (mostly plasma or LCD) that are increasingly available in electrical and specialist retailers. However, Sky does accept that for some types of programming, the higher screen resolution offered by the 1080 Interlaced format may be preferable.

    * Broadcasters planning on launching HD services on the digital satellite platform will be able to choose whether to broadcast content in 720 / P / 50 or 1080 / I / 25.

    * Sky's HD service will also utilise the advanced compression technology MPEG4. MPEG4 is a more efficient means of compressing the data in a TV picture."

    News Taken From Home Cinema Choice Website.

    Dave, Oldham.
     
  2. whiteswan

    whiteswan
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    Sony has revealed that their 2004 range of "HD Capable" set top boxes - which feature analogue component outputs instead of the "HD Ready" HDMI/HDCP outputs - will be able to be used with Sky's high definition television service when it launches.

    Quoting from their press release:

    "Sky’s most recent announcement has clarified that all current models will be able to receive HD broadcast via the analogue component inputs."

    "We are really excited about the development of HDTV and are pleased that we can support Sky as it prepares to broadcast in HDTV," said Adrian Northoversmith, head of digital strategy at Sony. "Existing Sony models will be able to receive HD broadcast and all new large screen Sony models introduced in 2005 will carry both a HDMI and standard analogue connection to remove any confusion consumers may have regarding this technology."

    The new sets are expected to go on sale in July.

    This question of whether Sky's HD service will offer analogue component outputs from its STB (made by Thomson) has been a vexed question for some time. Until six months ago anyone who purchased an "HD Capable" display (one with a resolution of 720x1280 or higher) did not have the choice of HDMI.

    Pioneer were one of the first to put HDMI/HDCP ("HD Ready") on their range of plasma displays and there are now a growing range of displays with HDMI/HDCP or HDCP capable DVI inputs on the market. The difference between HDMI and DVI is, in simple terms, that HDMI contains both audio and video while DVI is video only (both are digital and there are converter cables on the market).

    Dave, Oldham.
     
  3. St_ve

    St_ve
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    I question whether the older Sony or any other make of set will be able to recieve the Sky hi def sevice via component do they mean a degraded signal.
     
  4. KableMan

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  5. Mark H99

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    thats most interesting, so does that article basically say BBC hd won't need HDCP or am i missing something ?
     
  6. pantages

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    I changed my Sky+ package this morning and in the course of the conversation I had with the Sky customer adviser I mentioned the coming of HD tv in 2006. He replied, 'That's the first I've heard of it, I was told it would be a few years yet'! Somehow I am not surprised...
     
  7. MPK

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    hmm....I can spot several mistakes in the above statements:

    1. Many of today's plasma have "HD Ready" stickers, but only very few, e.g. Pioneers can actually accept 720p and 1080i @ 50Hz.
    2. HDCP only works via a digital connection and anyone using an analog connection will either see nothing at all or possibly a lower resolution 576i picture. Not quite sure how that Sony set top box is going to work...
     

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