New pc help please

pete1866

Active Member
Looking for help please to buy a new pc for home use primarily for photo editing and storage. Something that would cope with luminar easily etc
I am not really clued up with all this and where to buy from.
I believe I would want 16gb of ddr4 and a nvme hard drive, and probably 3tb of storage.
Would I need a specific graphics card or is integrated ok?
I have been looking at this one

Years ago I would just use ebuyer but their customer service looks to have gone downhill
Any help would be appreciated
Thanks
 

EndlessWaves

Distinguished Member
Best to avoid those sorts of systems with ancient 2013 graphics cards for general home use, stick to CPUs with integrated graphics as they're far more capable generally.

Whether you need a recent graphics card depends on the sort of editing you're doing. It's mainly used by the more expensive image editing programs and more demanding actions like complicated filters.

A PCI-E (NVMe) SSD isn't essential unless you're dealing with big transfers in an out which I guess isn't the case if you're only going with 3TB of storage. An SATA SSD will be just as fast in normal use.

If you don't need lots of drives then I'd personally avoid systems using big tower cases, a smaller PC is so much nicer to live with.
 

EndlessWaves

Distinguished Member
With photo editing, make sure you buy the the right type of monitor (IPS) and the best you can afford.

That's really only an issue if you need absolute colour consistency across the screen - IPS panels typically have the least colour shift between the centre and edges.

That's generally only professional use though.
 

pete1866

Active Member
Best to avoid those sorts of systems with ancient 2013 graphics cards for general home use, stick to CPUs with integrated graphics as they're far more capable generally.

Whether you need a recent graphics card depends on the sort of editing you're doing. It's mainly used by the more expensive image editing programs and more demanding actions like complicated filters.

A PCI-E (NVMe) SSD isn't essential unless you're dealing with big transfers in an out which I guess isn't the case if you're only going with 3TB of storage. An SATA SSD will be just as fast in normal use.

If you don't need lots of drives then I'd personally avoid systems using big tower cases, a smaller PC is so much nicer to live with.
Luminar is one I use
I thought integrated graphics were not as good as a separate card 🤷‍♂️ so that’s interesting
 
I thought integrated graphics were not as good as a separate card 🤷‍♂️ so that’s interesting
your right a modern integrated GPU is not as good as a modern external one most of the time but a modern internal one is better than a separate one thast was low end 10 years ago (the GT710 mentioned in that system you linked too)
 

EndlessWaves

Distinguished Member
Luminar is one I use
I thought integrated graphics were not as good as a separate card 🤷‍♂️ so that’s interesting

Integrated graphics used to be old GPU designs integrated into rarely updated budget motherboard chipsets. They were a cost saving exercise for the low end.

But around about ten years ago AMD and Intel moved them onto the CPUs which meant there was much more opportunity for them to be updated and they were going to see use even in high end systems.

So these days they're just as cutting edge as any graphics card, and we've seen instances where Intel has incorporated features into their integrated graphics before any graphics card.

They do have less brute power because they have to share the CPU's cooling system rather than having a big expansion card to themselves. However they're so good they've killed off new releases of everything except the big, power hungry graphics cards that consume at least as much as a high end CPU in their own right.

A quick search for recent threads on Luminar GPU use suggests it's got a few routines that can work on the GPU but most of it's work is done with the CPU:

Given graphics card demand is really high at the moment (usual shortages + cryptocurrency mining) and they're twice the normal price I'd probably not bother. It's always something you can drop in later.
 

KBD

Well-known Member
I'm an advocate for Lenovo, so a ThinkCentre, but I don't think they're in your budget.
Maybe you could find a refurbished.
Mac has always been revered in the photo & video editing world, haven't they?
 

pete1866

Active Member
I'm an advocate for Lenovo, so a ThinkCentre, but I don't think they're in your budget.
Maybe you could find a refurbished.
Mac has always been revered in the photo & video editing world, haven't they?
Maybe a Mac is something I should be looking at
Thought I would get better value for money with pcs
 

KBD

Well-known Member
VFM is definitely better with PC, a Lenovo kitted out similar to a Mac would cost about half as much as a Mac, in my experience.
 

JollyJamma

Active Member
Fifteen, twenty years ago yeah but I think the disastrous mac pro models of recent years have put off a lot of professionals.
For video and photo editing, you sometimes just need a Mac.

Even the bad models of late were still used by professionals.

The new M1 chip is brilliant and apple silicon is superior to their Intel products in a lot of ways (if you need 32 cores and 64 threads, maybe buy a server).


 
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