Dodgexander

Moderator
My best value TVs, 2020-2021 Edition

Please read this post before posting and asking for advice. Include all the information we need to recommend you the right TV!

  1. Before choosing an LCD TV you must understand which panel type you want from a TV, all have their pros and cons here. If you don't know which panel you want on your TV you will need to invest the time to research it.
  2. The second most important decision to make when purchasing an LCD TV is how important it is a TV handles HDR content, both to a high standard and without issues. The difference between a more expensive LCD TV and a cheaper one now is almost exclusively with HDR hardware, with budget models able to display SDR to a good standard. It is not like it used to be where the more you spend, the better overall picture quality you get..please read here: All about HDR (High Dynamic Range)
  3. The third is how much importance you place on motion. Not just how the TV copes with motion out of the box, but how important it is to you to be able to tweak and improve motion.
There are a lot of factors that determine one TV being better than another depending on your own usage, viewing conditions and what you personally value. Try to take the time to research and understand what you personally value from a TV.

This thread is compiled using model numbers and prices from the UK market, if you are from the EU, North America or the Rest of the World model numbers, value and pricing may differ. Please see here for model numbering differences in different regions.

IMPORTANT!!
Please remember that an upgrade won't always be an upgrade and in many cases getting a new UHD model can mean for worse picture quality than your current TV (sometimes compared to models as much as 10 year old). Do not automatically assume that a new TV will be better than your current one and do not assume that gaming at UHD will automatically be better than FHD, there are complications and drawbacks to using an UHD model which must be understood before purchasing!
See: Should I upgrade? - UHD vs FHD

Gamers detailed Q&A here.
Best buys for gaming
here.

Comparison of all OLED models here.


Last years guide: My best value TVs, 2019-2020 Edition

Notice any errors, both in recommendations or formatting? Let me know.
Notice a price drop? Let me know.

Value is based on prices available for everyone, employee discount or in store B2B/Club retailer pricing like Costco are not included.
-------------------
Jump to OP
Jump to 32" and under
Jump to 40-43"
Jump to 49-50"
Jump to 55-60"
Jump to 65-70"
Jump to 75-77"
Jump to 82-86"
Jump to special mentions/reasoning
Jump to FAQ
Jump to latest post
 
Last edited:

Dodgexander

Moderator
55-60"
Typical value of 55-60" LCDs = Excellent
Typical value of 55" OLEDs = Excellent

The most commonly purchased TV size and the first size where manufacturers offer high end TVs. Choose this size to get better value for money, more choice and better specifications than smaller models.

Beware also that for most people, 55-60" is really going to be on the small side to make the most of UHD content. For UHD to look better, look at larger TV sizes or view very close.

Low tier
Its becoming harder and harder to recommend any TVs in this price range due to the increased plethora of HDR content (most of which is unavoidable with built in apps). If your TV is a similar size and only 10 years old it may be better to reconsider keeping your current TV, or possibly treating the TV as SDR only.
  1. Hisense 55U7Q - An extra HDMI port, local dimming, 700 nits peak brightness, offering specs found on mid range TVs for low prices. The best low tier model to be used in a bright room. Dolby Vision and HDR10+ support. Wide colour gamut. In some HDR titles you may just get away with this TV.
Difference between all of the below is small, so small its almost insignificant. The order doesn't play a preference here, so just go for whichever ticks the most boxes for you. Beware that all these TVs support HDR, but HDR will not look good on them. It will be dim and washed out.
  1. Hisense 58A7100 - Currently worth the extra over the 55" AE7000, A7100 or A7300 due to a small price difference.
  2. Hisense 55AE7400 - Marginal cost increase over the lower tier Hisense models and ads a wide colour gamut and Dolby Vision and HDR10+ support like the U7Q.
  3. Samsung 55TU7100 / 55TU7000 - A good choice if you value upscaling and smart TV highly. There's a lot of variations of this TV which have the same picture quality but feature or connectivity changes. These are the cheapest models that offer the best value for money but you may prefer to pay extra for specific features. I can't keep up with the nonsensical model numbers but you can compare them all here: Samsung телевизори (инфо на първа страница). Anything 55TUxxxx is the same picture quality so don't go thinking the 55TU8000 is the better quality TV! HDR10+ support. 55TU8500 and up have wide colour gamuts.
  4. Philips 58PUS7805 / 58PUS7855 - Good choices for the best upscaling and motion on a budget, basic smart TV. If you want to pay extra for Android TV built in, consider the 58PUS8555 , 58PUS8535, 58PUS8505 or 58PUS9005 models instead. The difference between each TV is small, each has the same picture quality. I can't keep track of all the nonsensical naming scheme, but they can be compared here: Philips 2020: Übersicht / Line Up / Range aller 2020er Philips TVs - Toengels Philips Blog. Higher range 8 series models have Android TV instead of basic smart TV, wide colour gamuts. 9 series have better built in sound usually. Dolby Vision and HDR10+ support. Dolby Vision and HDR10+ support. 58PUS8505 and up have wide colour gamuts.
  5. Samsung 58TU7100 / 58TU7172 - A more expensive choice if you prefer a slightly bigger TV. HDR10+ support. I can't keep up with the nonsensical model numbers but you can compare them all here: Samsung телевизори (инфо на първа страница).
  6. LG 60UN7100 - A good choice if you don't mind spending a bit more, prefer a slightly bigger TV, decent upscaling and smart TV.
  7. Sony 55X7052 / 55X7053 / 55X7055 / 55X70H - Touch and go these being recommended as the cost is presently quite high. Basic smart TV. Motion better than average, but I'd choose the Philips models above instead if motion is a priority and you can't step up to higher tier models.
  1. LG 55UN7300/55UN7400 - Great smart TV, competitive pricing compared to the competition. Decent in a bright room. UN7300 is the first that comes with the magic remote. But you may also find value in the UN7100 if you don't care about a smart remote or the UN8000 and UN8100 if you want both smart remote and an extra HDMI port. LG differences here: LG_TV_LineUp_chart_2020_v1.0.pdf
  2. Philips 55PUS7805 / 55PUS7855 - Good choices for the best motion on a budget, basic smart TV. I can't keep track of all the nonsensical naming scheme, but they can be compared here: Philips 2020: Übersicht / Line Up / Range aller 2020er Philips TVs - Toengels Philips Blog. Dolby Vision and HDR10+ support.
  3. Sony 55XH8196 / 55XH8096 - A costly choice if viewing angles are the priority. Wide colour gamuts.You can spend £50 less on the 55X7052 / 55X7053 models instead if you don't want Android TV and will be happy with Sony's basic smart TV + also don't mind losing the wide colour gamut.
  1. Samsung 55Q60T / 55Q65T - Terrible value for money, spend more or spend less.
  2. Philips 55PUS9435 - Too expensive but may be an option for people wanting good built in sound. Uses an VA panel. Dolby Vision and HDR10+ support. Wide colour gamut. Good built in sound. Philips 2020: Übersicht / Line Up / Range aller 2020er Philips TVs - Toengels Philips Blog.
  3. 55" TCL models - Poor availability and usually only sold by Amazon with 1-2 year warranties make them hard to recommend. They are currently listed at a price that makes them poor value. This may change though. Some higher tier ones have HDR10+ and Dolby Vision support and wide colour gamuts.
  4. LG 55Nano79 / 55Nano81 - They are either exclusives that are highly priced, or models that don't make sense compared to more expensive or cheaper options. Dolby Vision support. Wide colour gamut. LG differences here: LG_TV_LineUp_chart_2020_v1.0.pdf
  5. Panasonic 58HX800 / 58HX820 - People ask a lot about this TV and it gets good reviews, but I can't personally recommend buying a TV this expensive given it shares the same shortfalls of TVs much cheaper. If you want a TV that is 10% better than cheaper models that costs 40% more you may prefer it. VA panel. Dolby Vision and HDR10+ support. Wide colour gamut.
  6. Other Panasonic models - Vestel made, poor quality.

Mid tier
These are what I like to call halfway there TVs, note quite good enough for HDR, but still a small step up compared to low tier. To most people it makes little sense to buy a TV in this section, but there may be some specific scenarios where you may want too. For example, TVs in this tier tend to have better motion and slightly better picture processing than the low tier. They also come with 120hz panels which can be good to reduce motion blur in both games and sport.
  1. Sony 55XH9005 / 55XH9096 / 55XH9296 - HDMI 2.1, good motion with its 120hz panel, around 750 nits peak brightness. Some HDR titles will look better than others. Dolby Vision support.
  1. LG 55Nano86 / 55Nano85 - Cheapest avenue to true HDMI 2.1 ports and 120hz panels. Dolby Vision HDR and wide colour gamuts. LG differences here: LG_TV_LineUp_chart_2020_v1.0.pdf
  1. LG 55Nano90 / 55Nano91 / 55Nano95 - Poor performance, and overpriced. Dolby Vision HDR and wide colour gamuts. 120hz IPS panel. HDMI 2.1 (2 or 4 ports)LG differences here: LG_TV_LineUp_chart_2020_v1.0.pdf
  2. Samsung 55Q70T / 55Q75T - Edge lit, low peak brightness, no FALD. No idea why anyone would buy this TV instead of the Sony 65XH9005 or TCL 65C815. 1x HDMI 2.1. HDR10+ Support.
  3. Panasonic 55HX900 / 55HX940 - Very overpriced considering the TV shares similar caveats with much cheaper options. 120hz IPS Panel. Dolby Vision and HDR10+ support. Wide colour gamut.

High tier
This is where HDR starts to get really good and the minimum I would go for if you want to use HDR on a TV. In the case of the OLEDs listed, even those not using much HDR content will see the most gains in picture quality all-around due to OLED tech. At this tier we start to see LCD TV models with both wider viewing angles and good HDR performance.
  1. Panasonic 55HZ980 - Great picture accuracy. Dolby Vision and HDR10+ support.
  2. LG 55BX - Make no mistake, this is usually the cheapest OLED but its picture quality in most instances is just as good as TVs costing twice as much money. 2x HDMI 2.1 ports. Dolby Vision support.
  3. Philips 55OLED805 / 55OLED865 - Android TV. A good option for better motion in video. Dolby Vision and HDR10+ support.
  4. LG 55CX - More expensive, but marginal gains over the BX. 100 nits brighter, better picture processing, smoother colour gradients. 4x HDMI 2.1 ports. Dolby Vision support.
  5. Sony 55A8 - A good option if you favour both motion and built in sound. Dolby Vision support.
  1. Hisense 55U8Q - The TV has some downsides, but the cheapest path to a true HDR TV. Dolby Vision and HDR10+ support.
  2. Sony 55XH9505 - The best value high end LCD TV. Great motion, upscaling, HDR performance. Wider viewing angles and improved Android TV. Dolby Vision support.
  3. Samsung 55Q80T - Reaches the minimum baseline specs to be considered a high tier HDR TV, but only just. 1x HDMI 2.1. HDR10+ support. In most situations the TVs above are better value.
  1. Samsung 55Q85T - Performs a bit better than the Q80T with HDR, but also has better viewing angles and anti glare. HDR10+ support.

Premium Tier
There is usually little to no need to spend more than the TVs already mentioned above, but I have listed these unless people are willing to spend extra on better built in sound or aesthetics. Picture quality will be almost indistinguishable to the high tier TVs.
These TVs should only be considered if you want the very best, you will however pay a big premium, and these TVs aren't good value for money.
  1. LG 55GX - Improves on the CX with better built in sound and aesthetics. Dolby Vision support. 4x HDMI 2.1.
  2. Sony 55AG9 - Excellent built in sound, excellent motion. Dolby Vision support.
  3. Panasonic 55HZ1500 - Excellent built in sound, picture accuracy and HDR format support are this TVs fortee. Dolby Vision and HDR10+ support.
  4. Philips 55OLED935 - Excellent built in sound and motion. Dolby Vision and HDR10+ support.
  5. Panasonic 55HZ2000 - Tweaked panel and power delivery make this the best OLED you can buy today. Good built in sound. Dolby Vision and HDR10+ support.
  1. Samsung 55Q90T - Hard to recommend on current pricing over the Sony XH9505. If you value better anti glare performance and better screen uniformity in HDR mode you may want this over the Sony XH9505. 1x HDMI 2.1. HDR10+ support.
  2. Samsung 55Q95T - The same as the Q90T but with a one connect box. 1x HDMI 2.1. HDR10+ support.
-------------------
Jump to OP
Jump to 32" and under
Jump to 40-43"
Jump to 49-50"
Jump to 55-60"
Jump to 65-70"
Jump to 75-77"
Jump to 82-86"
Jump to special mentions/reasoning
Jump to FAQ
Jump to latest post
 
Last edited:

Dodgexander

Moderator
65-70"
Typical value of 65-70" LCDs = Excellent
Typical value of 65 OLEDs = Good

The minimum most people should really be considering when wanting to get a benefit from UHD content. You still need to view very close to a 65" TV to see any benefit.

Low tier
Its becoming harder and harder to recommend any TVs in this price range due to the increased plethora of HDR content (most of which is unavoidable with built in apps). If your TV is a similar size and only 10 years old it may be better to reconsider keeping your current TV, or possibly treating the TV as SDR only.
  1. Hisense 65U7Q - An extra HDMI port, local dimming, 700 nits peak brightness, offering specs found on mid range TVs for low prices. The best low tier model to be used in a bright room. Dolby Vision and HDR10+ support. Wide colour gamut. In some HDR titles you may just get away with this TV.
Difference between all of the below is small, so small its almost insignificant. The order doesn't play a preference here, so just go for whichever ticks the most boxes for you. Beware that all these TVs support HDR, but HDR will not look good on them. It will be dim and washed out.
  1. Hisense 65AE7400 - Marginal cost increase over the lower tier Hisense models and ads a wide colour gamut and Dolby Vision and HDR10+ support like the U7Q.
  2. TCL 65P715 - A good choice if you want Android smart TV.
  3. Samsung 65TU7100 / 65TU7020 - A good choice if you value upscaling and smart TV highly. There's a lot of variations of this TV which have the same picture quality but feature or connectivity changes. These are the cheapest models that offer the best value for money but you may prefer to pay extra for specific features. I can't keep up with the nonsensical model numbers but you can compare them all here: Samsung телевизори (инфо на първа страница). Anything 65TUxxxx is the same picture quality so don't go thinking the 65TU8000 is the better quality TV! HDR10+ support. 65TU8500 has wide colour gamuts.
  4. LG 70UN7070 - A good choice if you don't mind spending a bit more, prefer a slightly bigger TV, decent upscaling and smart TV.
  5. Philips 70PUS7805 / 70PUS7855 - Good choice for the best upscaling and motion on a budget, basic smart TV. If you want to pay extra for Android TV built in, consider the 70PUS8555, 70PUS8505, 708105 or 70PUS9005 models instead. The difference between each TV is small, each has the same picture quality. I can't keep track of all the nonsensical naming scheme, but they can be compared here: Philips 2020: Übersicht / Line Up / Range aller 2020er Philips TVs - Toengels Philips Blog. Dolby Vision and HDR10+ support. 75PUS8505 and up have wide colour gamuts.
  6. Sony 65X7052 / 65X7053 - Touch and go these being recommended as the cost is presently quite high. Basic smart TV. Motion better than average, but I'd choose the Philips models above instead if motion is a priority and you can't step up to higher tier models.
  1. LG 65UN7300/65UN7400 - Great smart TV, competitive pricing compared to the competition. Decent in a bright room. UN7300 is the first that comes with the magic remote. But you may also find value in the UN7100 if you don't care about a smart remote or the UN8000 and UN8100 if you want both smart remote and an extra HDMI port. There are other variations, see the changes here: LG_TV_LineUp_chart_2020_v1.0.pdf
  2. Philips 65PUS7805 / 65PUS7855 - Good choices for the best motion on a budget, basic smart TV. I can't keep track of all the nonsensical naming scheme, but they can be compared here: Philips 2020: Übersicht / Line Up / Range aller 2020er Philips TVs - Toengels Philips Blog. Higher range 8 series models have Android TV instead of basic smart TV, wide colour gamuts. 9 series have better built in sound usually. Dolby Vision and HDR10+ support.
  3. Sony 65XH8196 / 55XH8096 - A costly choice if viewing angles are the priority. Wide colour gamuts. You can spend less on the 65X7052 / 65X7053 models instead if you don't want Android TV or a wide colour gamut and will be happy with Sony's basic smart TV.
  1. 70" Samsung models - Currently too expensive. HDR10+
  2. Samsung 65Q60T / 65Q65T - Terrible value for money, spend more or spend less.
  3. Philips 65PUS9435 - Too expensive but may be an option for people wanting good built in sound. Uses an VA panel. Dolby Vision and HDR10+ support. Wide colour gamut. Good built in sound. Philips 2020: Übersicht / Line Up / Range aller 2020er Philips TVs - Toengels Philips Blog.
  4. LG 65Nano79 / 65Nano81 - They are either exclusives that are highly priced, or models that don't make sense compared to more expensive or cheaper options. Dolby Vision support. LG differences here: LG_TV_LineUp_chart_2020_v1.0.pdf
  5. 65" TCL models sans P715 - Poor availability and usually only sold by Amazon with 1-2 year warranties make them hard to recommend. They are currently listed at a price that makes them poor value. This may change though.
  6. Panasonic 65HX800 / 65HX820 - People ask a lot about this TV and it gets good reviews, but I can't personally recommend buying a TV this expensive given it shares the same shortfalls of TVs much cheaper. If you want a TV that is 10% better than cheaper models that costs 40% more you may prefer it. Dolby Vision and HDR10+ support. Wide colour gamut.
  7. Other Panasonic models - Vestel made, poor quality.

Mid tier
These are what I like to call halfway there TVs, note quite good enough for HDR, but still a small step up compared to low tier. To most people it makes little sense to buy a TV in this section, but there may be some specific scenarios where you may want too. For example, TVs in this tier tend to have better motion and slightly better picture processing than the low tier. They also come with 120hz panels which can be good to reduce motion blur in both games and sport.
  1. Sony 65XH9005 / 65XH9096 / 65XH9296 - Good motion with its 120hz panel, around 750 nits peak brightness. Some HDR titles will look better than others. Narrow viewing angles. 2x HDMI 2.1. Dolby Vision support.
  2. TCL 65C815 - If you want the cheapest route to a 120hz panel for better motion. Not really suited to HDR use as its very dim. HDR10+ and Dolby Vision support. Wide colour gamut.
Strikethrough=Low availability.
  1. LG 65Nano86 / 65Nano85 - Cheapest avenue to 2x true HDMI 2.1 ports and 120hz panels. Dolby Vision support. Wide colour gamuts. LG differences here: LG_TV_LineUp_chart_2020_v1.0.pdf
  1. LG 65Nano90 / 65Nano91 / 65Nano95 / 65Nano97 / 65Nano99 - Poor performance, and overpriced. 120hz IPS panel. Dolby Vision support. Wide colour gamuts. HDMI 2.1 (2 or 4) LG differences here: LG_TV_LineUp_chart_2020_v1.0.pdf
  2. Samsung 65Q70T / 65Q75T - Edge lit, low peak brightness, no FALD. No idea why anyone would buy this TV instead of the Sony 65XH9005 or TCL 65C815. 120hz VA panel. 1x HDMI 2.1. HDR10+ Support.
  3. Panasonic 65HX940 - Very overpriced considering the TV shares similar caveats with much cheaper options. 120hz IPS Panel. Dolby Vision and HDR10+ support. Wide colour gamut.

High tier
This is where HDR starts to get really good and the minimum I would go for if you want to use HDR on a TV. In the case of the OLEDs listed, even those not using much HDR content will see the most gains in picture quality all-around due to OLED tech. At this tier we start to see LCD TV models with both wider viewing angles and good HDR performance.
  1. LG 65BX - Make no mistake, this may be the cheapest OLED but its picture quality in most instances is just as good as TVs costing twice as much money. 2x HDMI v2.1 ports. Dolby Vision support.
  2. Panasonic 65HZ980 - Great picture accuracy. Dolby Vision and HDR10+ support.
  3. LG 65CX - More expensive, but marginal gains over the BX. 100 nits brighter, better picture processing, smoother colour gradients. 4x HDMI 2.1 ports. Dolby Vision support.
  4. Philips 65OLED805 - Android TV, Dolby Vision and HDR10+ support.
  5. Sony 65A8 - A good option if you favour both motion and built in sound. Dolby Vision Support.
  1. Hisense 65U8Q - The TV has some downsides, but the cheapest path to a true HDR TV. Narrow viewing angles. Dolby Vision and HDR10+ support.
  2. Sony 65XH9505 - Great motion, upscaling, HDR performance. Wider viewing angles and improved Android TV. Dolby Vision support.
  3. Samsung 65Q80T - Reaches the minimum baseline specs to be considered a high tier HDR TV, but only just. Narrow viewing angles. 1x HDMI 2.1. HDR10+ support. In most situations the TVs above are better value.
  1. Samsung 65Q85T - Too expensive compared to the cheaper Q80T but does have slightly better HDR and wider viewing angles/better anti glare. 1x HDMI 2.1. HDR10+ support. Buy the Sony XH9505 or an OLED instead if you need better viewing angles.

Premium Tier
There is usually little to no need to spend more than the TVs already mentioned above, but I have listed these unless people are willing to spend extra on better built in sound or aesthetics. Picture quality will be almost indistinguishable to the high tier TVs.
These TVs should only be considered if you want the very best, you will however pay a big premium, and these TVs aren't good value for money.
  1. LG 65GX - Improves on the CX with better built in sound and aesthetics. Dolby Vision support.
  2. Sony 65AG9 - Excellent built in sound, excellent motion. Dolby Vision support
  3. Panasonic 65HZ1500 - Excellent built in sound, picture accuracy and HDR format support are this TVs fortee. Dolby Vision and HDR10+ support.
  4. Philips 65OLED935 - Excellent built in sound and motion. Dolby Vision and HDR10+ support.
  5. Panasonic 65HZ2000 - Tweaked panel and power delivery make this the best OLED you can buy today. Good built in sound. Dolby Vision and HDR10+ support.
  1. Samsung 65Q90T - Hard to recommend on current pricing over the Sony XH9505. If you value better anti glare performance and better screen uniformity in HDR mode you may want this over the Sony XH9505. 1x HDMI 2.1 and HDR10+ support.
  2. Samsung 65Q95T - The same as the Q90T but with a one connect box. 1x HDMi 2.1 and HDR10+ support.
-------------------
Jump to OP
Jump to 32" and under
Jump to 40-43"
Jump to 49-50"
Jump to 55-60"
Jump to 65-70"
Jump to 75-77"
Jump to 82-86"
Jump to special mentions/reasoning
Jump to FAQ
Jump to latest post
 
Last edited:

Dodgexander

Moderator
48-50"
Typical value of 49-50" LCDs = Average

There's not much point having UHD resolution on TVs this large, but the market dictates now we have to buy UHD models so there's no choice. Since these are so small, don't expect to see much of a quality difference in terms of resolution detail from a high quality source. But at the same time, you can expect poorer quality sources to look better too, so depending on your viewing distance these TVs are more suited to those still intending to use a lot of HD material or less.

Low tier
Its becoming harder and harder to recommend any TVs in this price range due to the increased plethora of HDR content (most of which is unavoidable with built in apps). If your TV is a similar size and only 10 years old it may be better to reconsider keeping your current TV, or possibly treating the TV as SDR only.
  1. Hisense 50U7Q - An extra HDMI port, local dimming, 700 nits peak brightness, offering specs found on mid range TVs for low prices. The best low tier model to be used in a bright room. Dolby Vision and HDR10+ support. Wide colour gamut. In some HDR titles you may just get away with this TV.
Difference between all of the below is small, so small its almost insignificant. The order doesn't play a preference here, so just go for whichever ticks the most boxes for you. Beware that all these TVs support HDR, but HDR will not look good on them. It will be dim and washed out.
  1. Hisense 50A7300 - You can go for the 50AE7400 instead if you want both Dolby Vision and a wide colour gamut but its currently £80 more, so poor value compared.
  2. Philips 50PUS7805 / 50PUS7855 / 50PUS7555 / 50PUS7505 / 50PUS8105 - Good choices for the best upscaling and motion on a budget, basic smart TV. If you want to pay extra for Android TV built in, consider the 50PUS8555 , 50PUS8535, 50PUS8505 or 50PUS9005 models instead. The difference between each TV is small and not with picture quality, I can't keep track of all the nonsensical features, but they can be compared here: Philips 2020: Übersicht / Line Up / Range aller 2020er Philips TVs - Toengels Philips Blog. HDR10+ and Dolby Vision support. 50PUS8505 and up have Wide colour gamuts.
  3. Samsung 50TU7100 / 50TU7020 - A good choice if you value upscaling and smart TV highly. There's a lot of variations of this TV which have the same picture quality but feature or connectivity changes. These are the cheapest models that offer the best value for money but you may prefer to pay extra for specific features. I can't keep up with the nonsensical model numbers but you can compare them all here: Samsung телевизори (инфо на първа страница). Anything 50TUxxxx is the same picture quality so don't go thinking the 50TU8000 is the better quality TV! HDR10+ support. TU8500 and up have wide colour gamuts.
  4. LG 50UN7300 / 50UN7400 - Like the Samsungs above. If you want good smart TV and better upscaling you may want to pay extra for these. There's other variations too, see the changes here: LG_TV_LineUp_chart_2020_v1.0.pdf
  1. LG 49UN7300 / 49UN7390 - Great smart TV, competitive pricing compared to the competition. Decent in a bright room. 49UN7300 is the first that comes with the magic remote. But you may also find value in the 49UN7100 if you don't care about a smart remote or the UN8000 and UN8100 if you want both smart remote and an extra HDMI port. Good for a bright room. LG differences here: LG_TV_LineUp_chart_2020_v1.0.pdf
  2. Sony 49XH8196 / 49XH8096 / 49XH8305 - A costly choice if viewing angles are the priority. They are the same TV with different motion interpolation strengths/aesthetics. Check Sony's website for differences. You can spend less on the 49X7052 / 49X7053 models instead if you don't want Android TV and will be happy with Sony's basic smart TV. These are good options for good video motion on a budget. Wide colour gamuts.
  1. Samsung 50Q60T / 50Q65T - It's basically the same TV as the 50TU8500 but with QLED guise. Overpriced generally. HDR10+ support. Wide colour gamut.
  2. LG Nano79 / Nano80 / Nano81 - They are either exclusives that are highly priced, or models that don't make sense compared to more expensive or cheaper options. Above average in bright conditions. Dolby Vision support. Wide colour gamuts. LG differences here: LG_TV_LineUp_chart_2020_v1.0.pdf
  3. Panasonic 50HX800 / 50HX820 - People ask a lot about this TV and it gets good reviews, but I can't personally recommend buying a TV this expensive given it shares the same shortfalls of TVs much cheaper. If you want a TV that is 10% better than cheaper models that costs 40% more you may prefer it. Dolby Vision and HDR10+ support. Wide colour gamut.
  4. Other Panasonic models - Vestel made, poor quality.
  5. 50" TCL models - Poor availability and usually only sold by Amazon with 1-2 year warranties make them hard to recommend. They are currently listed at a price that makes them poor value. This may change though. Good in dark conditions. Some higher tier models have Dolby Vision and HDR10+ and wide colour gamuts.

Mid tier
These are what I like to call halfway there TVs, note quite good enough for HDR, but still a small step up compared to low tier. To most people it makes little sense to buy a TV in this section, but there may be some specific scenarios where you may want too. For example, TVs in this tier tend to have better motion and slightly better picture processing than the low tier. They also come with 120hz panels which can be good to reduce motion blur in both games and sport.
  1. Sony 49XH8505 / 49XH9196 - Good motion for video. Wide colour gamut.
  1. LG 49Nano86 - Only option if you want good viewing angles and 120hz at this size. 2x HDMI 2.1 ports. Good in bright rooms. Dolby Vision support. Wide colour gamut. LG differences here: LG_TV_LineUp_chart_2020_v1.0.pdf
  1. Panasonic 49HX900 - Very overpriced considering the TV shares similar caveats with much cheaper options. 120hz IPS Panel. Dolby Vision and HDR10+ support. Wide colour gamut.

High tier
This is where HDR starts to get really good and the minimum I would go for if you want to use HDR on a TV. In the case of the OLEDs listed, even those not using much HDR content will see the most gains in picture quality all-around due to OLED tech. At this tier we start to see LCD TV models with both wider viewing angles and good HDR performance.
  1. LG 48CX - The best all round OLED TV. 4x HDMI 2.1 ports. Dolby Vision support.
  2. Philips 48OLED935 - A good option if you want better built in sound, Android TV and good motion in video. Dolby Vision and HDR10+ support.
  1. Sony 49XH9505 - The best value high end LCD TV. Great motion, upscaling, HDR performance and improved Android TV. Narrow viewing angles at this size (<55"). Dolby Vision support.
  1. None
  1. Samsung 49Q80T / 49Q85T- Lack a 120hz panel at this size so not recommended against the Sony XH9505. No HDMI 2.1 at this size.HDR10+ support.

Premium Tier
There is usually little to no need to spend more than the TVs already mentioned above, but I have listed these unless people are willing to spend extra on better built in sound or aesthetics. Picture quality will be almost indistinguishable to the high tier TVs.
  1. Sony 48A9 - A good option if you favour both motion and built in sound. Android TV. Dolby Vision support.
-------------------
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Jump to 32" and under
Jump to 40-43"
Jump to 49-50"
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Dodgexander

Moderator
40-43"
Typical value of 40-43" LCDs = Poor

There's usually no point buying UHD TVs this size, so depending on the size and age of your old TV, you may want to consider keeping your old TV instead if you can. Many TVs made in the past 10 years will match, or even be higher quality than these models today, but it does depend a lot on the type of content you use. There's only a choice of low tier models, with one or two options that are too expensive to recommend.
At this size its best to spend as little money as possible since spending more will not mean you get a better spec TV.

Low tier
Its becoming harder and harder to recommend any TVs in this price range due to the increased plethora of HDR content (most of which is unavoidable with built in apps). If your TV is a similar size and only 10 years old it may be better to reconsider keeping your current TV, or possibly treating the TV as SDR only.
  1. Hisense 43A7300 - You can go for the 43AE7400 instead if you want both Dolby Vision and a wide colour gamut but its currently £80 more, so poor value compared.
  2. Samsung 43TU7100 / 43TU7000 - A good choice if you value upscaling and smart TV highly. There's a lot of variations of this TV which have the same picture quality but feature or connectivity changes. These are the cheapest models that offer the best value for money but you may prefer to pay extra for specific features. I can't keep up with the nonsensical model numbers but you can compare them all here: Samsung телевизори (инфо на първа страница). Anything 43TUxxxx is the same picture quality so don't go thinking the 43TU8000 is the better quality TV! HDR10+ support. 43TU8500 and up have wide colour gamuts.
  1. LG 43UN7300 / 43UN7390 - Great smart TV, competitive pricing compared to the competition. Decent in a bright room. 49UN7300 is the first that comes with the magic remote. But you may also find value in the 49UN7100 if you don't care about a smart remote or the UN8000 and UN8100 if you want both smart remote and an extra HDMI port. LG differences here: LG_TV_LineUp_chart_2020_v1.0.pdf
  2. Philips 43PUS7805 / 43PUS7855 - Good choices for the best motion on a budget, basic smart TV. I can't keep track of all the nonsensical naming scheme, but they can be compared here: Philips 2020: Übersicht / Line Up / Range aller 2020er Philips TVs - Toengels Philips Blog. Higher range 8 series models have Android TV instead of basic smart TV, wide colour gamuts. 9 series have better built in sound usually. Dolby Vision and HDR10+ support. Dolby Vision and HDR10+ support.
  3. Sony 43XH8196 / 43XH8096 / 43XH8305 - A costly choice if viewing angles are the priority. Wide colour gamuts. They are the same TV with different motion interpolation strengths/aesthetics. Check Sony's website for differences. You can spend less on the 43X7052 / 43X7053 models instead if you don't want Android TV and will be happy with Sony's basic smart TV and no wide colour gamut.
  1. Samsung 43Q60T / 43Q65T - It's basically the same TV as the 43TU8500 but with QLED guise. Overpriced generally. HDR10+ support. Wide colour gamut.
  2. Philips 43PUS9235 - Too expensive but may be an option for people wanting good built in sound. Uses an VA panel. Dolby Vision and HDR10+ support. Wide colour gamut. Good built in sound. Philips 2020: Übersicht / Line Up / Range aller 2020er Philips TVs - Toengels Philips Blog.
  3. 43" TCL models - Poor availability and usually only sold by Amazon with 1-2 year warranties make them hard to recommend. They are currently listed at a price that makes them poor value. This may change though. Some higher tier models come with Dolby Vision and HDR10+ support.
  4. Panasonic 40HX800 / 40HX820 - People ask a lot about this TV and it gets good reviews, but I can't personally recommend buying a TV this expensive given it shares the same shortfalls of TVs much cheaper. If you want a TV that is 10% better than cheaper models that costs 40% more you may prefer it. Dolby Vision and HDR10+ support. Wide colour gamut.
  5. Other Panasonic models - Vestel made, poor quality.

Mid tier
  1. Panasonic 43HX900 - Very overpriced considering the TV shares similar caveats with much cheaper options. 120hz IPS Panel. Dolby Vision and HDR10+ support. Wide colour gamut.
  2. Sony 43XH8505 / 43XH9196 - Much like the Panasonic, it costs far too much money. 120hz IPS panel. It one of two paths to a 120hz panel at this size though.
-------------------
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Jump to 32" and under
Jump to 40-43"
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Jump to 82-86"
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Dodgexander

Moderator
75-77"
Typical value of 75" LCDs = Average
Typical value of 77" OLEDs = Poor

Now we are talking, big TVs are suited much more to get the most out of UHD, especially if you view close up. You can however expect to pay a premium for models at this size, especially OLEDs.

Low tier
Its becoming harder and harder to recommend any TVs in this price range due to the increased plethora of HDR content (most of which is unavoidable with built in apps). If your TV is a similar size and only 10 years old it may be better to reconsider keeping your current TV, or possibly treating the TV as SDR only.
  1. Samsung 75TU7100 / 75TU7000 - A good choice if you value upscaling and smart TV highly. There's a lot of variations of this TV which have the same picture quality but feature or connectivity changes. These are the cheapest models that offer the best value for money but you may prefer to pay extra for specific features. I can't keep up with the nonsensical model numbers but you can compare them all here: Samsung телевизори (инфо на първа страница). Anything 75TUxxxx is the same picture quality so don't go thinking the 75TU8000 is the better quality TV! HDR10+ support. 55TU8500 and up have wide colour gamuts.
  2. Hisense 75A7100 - Big screen on the cheap, great value for money.
  3. Sony 75XH8096 - If you are prepared to pay a bit more for better upscaling and motion, go for this model. Wide colour gamut.
  1. LG 75UN7070 - Great smart TV, competitive pricing compared to the competition. Decent in a bright room. LG differences here: LG_TV_LineUp_chart_2020_v1.0.pdf
  2. Philips 75PUS7805 / 75PUS7855 - Good choices for the best motion on a budget, basic smart TV. I can't keep track of all the nonsensical naming scheme, but they can be compared here: Philips 2020: Übersicht / Line Up / Range aller 2020er Philips TVs - Toengels Philips Blog. Dolby Vision and HDR10+ support.
  1. Samsung 75Q60T / 75Q65T - Terrible value for money, spend more or spend less. 60hz VA panel. Wide colour gamut. 1x HDMI 2.1. HDR10+ support.
  2. LG 75Nano79 - Poor value. 60hz IPS panel. Dolby Vision HDR support. Wide colour gamut. LG differences here: LG_TV_LineUp_chart_2020_v1.0.pdf

Mid tier
These are what I like to call halfway there TVs, note quite good enough for HDR, but still a small step up compared to low tier. To most people it makes little sense to buy a TV in this section, but there may be some specific scenarios where you may want too. For example, TVs in this tier tend to have better motion and slightly better picture processing than the low tier. They also come with 120hz panels which can be good to reduce motion blur in both games and sport.
  1. Sony 75XH9005 / 75XH9096 / 75XH9296 - HDMI 2.1, good motion with its 120hz panel, around 750 nits peak brightness. Some HDR titles will look better than others. Dolby Vision support.
  2. TCL 75C815 - Not much choice at this size. If you can find one of these then its by far the best value. Also comes with better than average sound built in. HDR10+ and Dolby Vision support. Wide colour gamut.
  1. LG 75UN8500 - Really the only option since the Nano series TVs are either not sold at this size, are too expensive, or lower spec. Dolby Vision. LG differences here: LG_TV_LineUp_chart_2020_v1.0.pdf
  1. LG 75Nano90 / 75Nano91 / 75Nano99 - Poor performance, and overpriced. 120hz IPS panel. Dolby Vision support. Wide colour gamut. LG differences here: LG_TV_LineUp_chart_2020_v1.0.pdf
  2. Samsung 75Q70T / 75Q75T - Edge lit, low peak brightness, no FALD. 120hz VA panel. No idea why anyone would buy this TV instead of the Sony 75XH9005/75XH9096 or TCL 75C815. 1x HDMI 2.1. HDR10+ Support.
  3. Panasonic 75HX940 - Very overpriced considering the TV shares similar caveats with much cheaper options. 120hz VA Panel. Dolby Vision and HDR10+ support. Wide colour gamut.

High tier
This is where HDR starts to get really good and the minimum I would go for if you want to use HDR on a TV. In the case of the OLEDs listed, even those not using much HDR content will see the most gains in picture quality all-around due to OLED tech. At this tier we start to see LCD TV models with both wider viewing angles and good HDR performance.
  1. LG 77CX - The best all round OLED. 4x HDMI 2.1 ports. Dolby Vision support. Dolby Vision support.
  2. Sony 77AG9 - Excellent built in sound, excellent motion and picture processing.
  1. Sony 75XH9505 - Very good motion and HDR performance for the price. Dolby Vision support.
  1. Samsung 75Q85T - More expensive and not as good all-round compared to the Sony XH9505 but you may want to pay the extra if you need the very best anti glare. 1x HDMI 2.1 port. HDR10+ support.

Premium tier
There is usually little to no need to spend more than the TVs already mentioned above, but I have listed these unless people are willing to spend extra on better built in sound or aesthetics. Picture quality will be almost indistinguishable to the high tier TVs.
These TVs should only be considered if you want the very best, you will however pay a big premium, and these TVs aren't good value for money.
  1. LG 77GX - Too expensive compared to CX. Nicer aesthetics and better sound. 4x HDMi 2.1 ports. Dolby Vision support.
  1. Samsung 75Q90T - Great HDR. Too expensive. 1x HDMI 2.1 port. HDR10+ support.
  2. Samsung 75Q95T - Great HDR. Too expensive. Q90T + One connect box for cleaner install. 1x HDMI 2.1 port. HDR10+ support.
-------------------
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Jump to 32" and under
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Last edited:

Dodgexander

Moderator
82-86"
Typical value = Poor

Availability in Europe on these models is quite poor, especially in the high end market. Yet this size really does show off UHD content excellently.

Low tier
Its becoming harder and harder to recommend any TVs in this price range due to the increased plethora of HDR content (most of which is unavoidable with built in apps). If your TV is a similar size and only 10 years old it may be better to reconsider keeping your current TV, or possibly treating the TV as SDR only.
  1. Samsung 82TU8000 / 85TU8000 - Big screen on the cheap, great value. HDR10+ support. I can't keep up with the nonsensical model numbers but you can compare them all here: Samsung телевизори (инфо на първа страница).
  2. LG 82UN8000 - Almost identical performance to the TU8000 but by LG instead. You may prefer their smart TV. LG differences here: LG_TV_LineUp_chart_2020_v1.0.pdf
  1. Samsung 85Q60T - Too expensive. HDR10+ support. Wide colour gamut.
  2. Sony 85XH8096 - Too expensive. Wide colour gamut.
Mid tier
These are what I like to call halfway there TVs, note quite good enough for HDR, but still a small step up compared to low tier. To most people it makes little sense to buy a TV in this section, but there may be some specific scenarios where you may want too. For example, TVs in this tier tend to have better motion and slightly better picture processing than the low tier. They also come with 120hz panels which can be good to reduce motion blur in both games and sport.
  1. Sony 85XH9005 / 85XH9096 - 2x HDMI 2.1 port, good motion with its 120hz panel, around 750 nits peak brightness. Some HDR titles will look better than others. Dolby Vision support.
  1. LG 86UN8500 - If you need wider viewing angles, this is your only option. Dolby Vision support. LG differences here: LG_TV_LineUp_chart_2020_v1.0.pdf
  1. Samsung 85Q70T - Edge lit, low peak brightness, no FALD. No idea why anyone would buy this TV instead of the Sony 85XH9005/XH9096. 1x HDMI 2.1. HDR10+ Support.
  2. LG 86Nano90 / 86Nano91 - Poor performance, and overpriced. Dolby Vision support. Wide colour gamuts. LG differences here: LG_TV_LineUp_chart_2020_v1.0.pdf

High tier
This is where HDR starts to get really good and the minimum I would go for if you want to use HDR on a TV. In the case of the OLEDs listed, even those not using much HDR content will see the most gains in picture quality all-around due to OLED tech. At this tier we start to see LCD TV models with both wider viewing angles and good HDR performance.
  1. Sony 85XH9505 - Very good motion and HDR performance for the price. Dolby Vision support.
  1. Samsung 85Q95T - Too expensive compared to the Sony XH9505 but you may want to pay the extra if you need the very best anti glare. 1x HDMI 2.1 port. HDR10+ support.
  2. Samsung 85Q80T - Too expensive compared to the better Sony 85XH9505. Narrow viewing angles. 1x HDMI 2.1. HDR10+ support.
-------------------
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Jump to 32" and under
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Dodgexander

Moderator
32" and smaller
Typical value: Terrible
There are very little TVs available at this size now, and mostly manufactures do not refresh their lines each year, so you can end up buying TVs several years out of date. There's also very little info about picture quality at this size, so recommendations are next to impossible.

I'd suggest looking at Hisense or LG models, as at least they refresh their model years year by year compared to other manufacturers.
-----------
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Jump to 32" and under
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Dodgexander

Moderator
Gamers - Extra Info

Input lag is low enough in game mode on all TVs now, so in that respect every TV is good at gaming.

If you are shopping in the lower end of the market you'll have to make a choice between better motion blur and viewing angles with an IPS type panel on a TV, or better blacks and contrast from a TV with a VA panel. Once you reach mid range models, TVs with VA type panels start to have less motion blur so its a non-issue.

HDR consoles, PC gaming and future proofing - HDMI v2.1 spec is currently in the transition phase, not all TVs include useful HDMI 2.1 gaming features like Auto Low Latency Mode(ALLM) and Variable Refresh Rate (VRR) and some offer both, or a mix of one or the other.

See here for the best buys for gaming as a priority: My best TVs for next gen gaming 2020-21 They are great TVs for video too.
-------------------
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Jump to 32" and under
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Dodgexander

Moderator
Special Mentions/Reasoning

No doubt the guide will come with lots of questions. You will wonder why certain models you are shopping at are missing from the list, or even why well reviewed products are missing. I hope to explain that here.

The guide is based on current value for money in the UK market, whilst prices are often similar in other regions too (especially Europe) it does not mean if you find a TV cheaper than I did that its not good value if its not in the guide. However I will try an explain my omissions below.

In short, if a TV is not listed, its because it is not good value compared to the competition, as simple as that.

Panasonic (HX800 especially)

There's a distinct lack of Panasonic models in my guide, and for good reason too. Now before you ask, I am a Panasonic fan and I own two Panasonic TVs currently. The problem with Panasonic now is their pricing strategy, simply put; they are charging far too much money for their LCD TVs.

Panasonic LCD TVs lower than HX800 are omitted completely due to Vestel assembly. Poor quality, stay clear.

Samsung/Philips models

You'll also notice at most sizes there's a distinct lack of recommendations from Samsung and Philips, Samsung especially at lower sizes. The reason for this is purely the panel lottery.
I don't want to recommend a TV when I do not know for sure which panel type it comes with, and with many Samsung and Philips models they are not included in the guide for that reason.
I've stressed so many times that the most important decision when purchasing a TV is knowing which panel type the TV has. If you don't care which panel type your TV comes with, then by all means buy a Samsung or Philips not listed in the guide, do not however ask me to compare them since I simply can't until I know what panel type comes on the TV.
Also, when seeking which panel comes on which TV, do not rely on websites like displayspeifications.com, its not reliable!
The most steadfast way to determine panel type is find a review of the TV within Europe, or find a bunch of users who have purchased that TV to determine themselves which panel it comes with. If there is a review citing a TV comes with a certain panel type from Samsung or Philips then there's a good chance you will also get the same panel type when you buy the TV...but be aware that Samsung especially are famous from shipping the same TV with multiple types of panel, so whilst you may get excited if another forum member spots his Samsung TV comes with a VA panel, it doesn't mean if you buy the same TV you will necessary end up with the same panel! I suggest not taking the risk since generally there are much better value options anyway, but if you have to, make sure you purchase from a reputable retailer and can return the TV if you are unhappy. You don't want to buy a TV expecting it to have wide viewing angles only to return it because it doesn't. Likewise you don't want to buy a TV expecting blacks, contrast and screen uniformity to be better, only to return it because it doesn't. For this reason these models are omitted from the guide when I do not know the kind of panel they come with.

Omission of certain models at different sizes.

Usually with good reason, let me know if you think I've missed something.

Sound

Sound is poor on almost every TV now, its a good idea to pair a TV with a designated soundbar or sound-system. If you do want better built in sound you only have a few options; at 50" and 55" Philips do their 8 series with B and W speakers integrated...but at 50" the price is extortionate, whilst at 55" the price is decent.

Apart from that you need to look at the premium OLED models. All OLED manufacturers have models that are more "premium" with better integrated sound.

Club/Employee discounts

Pricing in the guide does not reflect club or employee discounts. If you happen to see a large discount through an employee programme or from a B2B shop such as Costco, then by all means mention the deal, but I cannot put it in this guide. Currently Samsung have a 25% discount for students and NHS employees which really make the Samsung models a lot better value.
-------------------
Jump to OP
Jump to 32" and under
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Jump to 82-86"
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Dodgexander

Moderator
FAQ

Q. What is a QLED
A. A QLED is a term Samsung decided to use to describe their method of displaying a wider range of colours on their high range TVs. Now adopted by other manufacturers such as Hisense. It is not a comparatively new panel technology like OLED. Do not believe the marketing gimmicks. QLEDs are just LCD TVs!

Q. I want a TV to use for gaming, what are your recommendations?
A. My best TVs for next gen gaming 2020-21

Q. I found x model TV that is a 2019 model. How does it compare to 2020 models in this guide?
A. See: 2019-20/2020-21 range comparison. & My best value TVs, 2019-2020 Edition

Q. What is a wide colour gamut you speak of?
A. A wide colour gamut can give you a few % more colours with SDR and even more noticeable better colour with HDR.

Q. To get the most from an UHD TV, how close should I view?
Q. How big of a TV should I buy?
Q. I have purchased an UHD TV and I am disappointed by how it handles the content I watch. Why is this?
A. How close you view depends what you want from a TV and what content you use. If you want to notice UHD and get more of an improvement with higher quality sources then you need to view closer to a larger TV.
If you still use the TV to watch content that isn't high quality yet then you are better viewing farther from a smaller TV.
Not only that but never before have we had such a wide variety of source quality differences. More upscaling needed on UHD models = worse picture quality.
More differences, included recommended charts can be viewed here: TV Viewing Distance Guide

Should I upgrade? - UHD vs FHD

Please read the articles before deciding to spend money on a new UHD model.

Q. How will I know which model is better than my old TV?
A. Some people think that new UHD models will make everything look better than your old TV. This is not always the case. A new TV will look better if you feed it good, high quality material and you view close enough to notice a difference. It is not going to look good if you are still viewing content that isn't high quality yet. In many cases its simply better keeping the TV you have. More detail here: Should I upgrade? - UHD vs FHD

Q. My old Plasma is on its way out, which model is comparable?
A. Most people will be happy with any TV on this list coming from a Plasma. Depending whether you need wide viewing angles or prefer better blacks you will need to choose the panel type you want from an LCD TV or go OLED. More detail here: Thinking of replacing your plasma? and differences in motion of all technology here: Explanation and Best Buys for the Motion sensitive

Q. I want good motion processing from a TV. Which model should I go for.
A. That is too general of a question, motion has too many topics to place under one parameter. I have written about differences in motion before here: Explanation and Best Buys for the Motion sensitive generally Philips and Sony are good bets.

Q. I saw X TV in the shop and Y TV that wasn't in your guide looked better.
A. Never trust what you see in the shop.

Q. How can I tell which panel type a TV comes with?
A. You may never know for sure, certainly before you buy a TV anyway.
There is nothing stopping a manufacturer for changing the panel type it ships on a TV mid production or in the case of some manufactures like Samsung, use different panels on the same TV, sometimes differing per region. Here is the best way you can tell.

Q. What about direct lit or edge lit TVs and local dimming?
A. Until you reach higher end models (Sony XH9005 or higher) direct lighting is not a consideration to really think about when purchasing a TV. The talk you read online about direct lit being better is outdated and/or based on the TV also having good local dimming. There may be direct lit versions of cheaper TVs and edge lit versions but since neither will employ any form of usable local dimming the picture quality will be no better on the direct lit model. Of course direct lit TVs are also thicker aesthetically.

Q. What about local dimming?
A. Usually, unless you are looking at LCDs such as the Sony XH9005 or Hisense U7Q or above local dimming is a specification that is best glossed over. Manufacturers will mention cheaper TVs have local dimming (Samsung, LG, Hisense) but their local dimming does not work well at all and is often best turned off.

Q. What about manufacturer hz spec? I saw one TV with 100hz and another with a 1000hz.
A. Much the same as with local dimming above, manufacturers give incorrect specs and try and mislead consumers when it comes to hz refresh rate. Do not be fooled on their websites or shop websites by higher hz figures, all it means is one TV can use its software to make motion appear smoother and unless you know you are going to use heavy motion interpolation it is best ignored. Most people do not use this feature at all, especially if they do not watch sport. If you can find a spec called panel hz instead and it comes as 50,60,100 or 120hz this is legitimate and a useful spec to look out for. For example the 50" Hisense U7A has a 60hz panel whilst the 55" version has 120hz. With Sony TVs typically they will have dozens of model numbers all with the same picture quality but different quoted fake hz, they all have the same panel refresh rate.

Q. But what about OLED Burn in and its risk?
A. OLED Burn In Risk

Q. Should I buy a high end OLED eg the LG CX or a high end LCD eg the Samsung Q90T?
A. You need to decide which technology favours you the best. I would always recommend OLED to someone unless they felt they will be affected by screen burn or they in particular want much more brighter HDR compared to the more refined gains of OLED.

Q. When is the best time to buy a TV?
A. The best time to buy a TV

Q. Why does my new UHD TV look so poor?
A. Should I upgrade? - UHD vs FHD

Q. How do I know the viewing angles I need from a TV?
A. It's quite simple to calculate. A LCD TV with a VA panel looks fine up to 30 degrees to either side of the centre of the TV. If you need a wider viewing angle than that you need an LCD with an IPS panel.
Q. But what about OLED viewing angles?
A. OLEDs have the best viewing angles, looking even better than IPS LCDs at a much tighter angle.

More detail and an example image here.

Q. But what about true 10bit panels? The 10 in HDR10 means I need a high bit-depth TV for good HDR right?
A. No it doesn't. Bit rate is about last criteria to look for when it comes to finding a good HDR TV. There are far more important factors to look out for. More detail here.

Q. I want to understand more about this "banding, vertical banding, dirty screen effect and clouding" I keep hearing about.
Q. I want my TV to be free of "banding, vertical banding, dirty screen effect and clouding"
A. Read this post.

Q. Why have you left certain models out of your guide completely? Surely there must be more choice?
Q. Is x model that isn't in your guide good value?
A. If a model isn't in the guide it is because I believe it to be too expensive to be good value. That doesn't mean it won't be the best value for you, someone may have specific needs that make one TV, no matter how poor in value good for their uses. If you have specific needs that you think aren't met by the guide, please let us know.

Q. Dodge, why do you not recommend UHD gaming?
A. UHD gaming can make for a worse experience than FHD, see: Should I upgrade? - UHD vs FHD

Q. I can't believe you are telling me my older TV is better than a new one? I want to upgrade! I am fed up of having to wind up my TV every evening before I watch it.
A. Believe it or not there have been some cracking TVs over the years, especially in the Plasma and LCD era of only a few years back. Some TVs are just hard acts to follow and will beat many on this list today for quality.

Q. I want 8k recommendations
A. Most 8k TVs are poor value, best avoided for now.

Q. What about Dolby Atmos, eARC, Sound?
A. It's a complicated topic but most TVs support Dolby Atmos audio being sent via HDMI from streaming services. Only TVs that have eARC support the passing of HD Dolby Atmos audio. HD Dolby Atmos audio is used in video games and physical disc media like UHD Blu-Rays. You only need eARC if you are using a soundbar without a HDMI input so you are forced to switch every device through the TV or the HDMI input on your soundbar doesn't support the latest HDMI features or HDMI formats. Users of AVRs do not need eARC at all since they can plug devices directly into the receiver before their TV.

Q. I am interested in the Samsung frame TV or Serif. They must be great TVs because they cost so much!
A. I'm afraid not, you are paying for the niche frame and not the TV itself. They are no better than Samsung's cheap TU range TVs.

-------------------
Jump to OP
Jump to 32" and under
Jump to 40-43"
Jump to 49-50"
Jump to 55-60"
Jump to 65-70"
Jump to 75-77"
Jump to 82-86"
Jump to special mentions/reasoning
Jump to FAQ
Jump to latest post
 
Last edited:

Dodgexander

Moderator
  1. 16/11/2020 - Initial release.
  2. 17/11/2020 - Fixed a lot of mistakes and added even more info, specifically regarding HDMI 2.1 support and HDR formats. Added info to the FAQ about Dolby Atmos.
  3. 17/11/2020 - Added more Philips and LG 70" models. Added LG spec sheet link on low and mid tier models.
  4. 18/11/2020 - Panasonic HZ980 price drop, added to guide.
  5. 30/11/2020 - Updated and revamped the mid tier models completely. Added missing Samsung models on the premise they should be using VA. No guarantees. Added 43" models according to known panel info, - Again no guarantees. Tied a lot of mistakes, formatting and moved Samsung 55" and up Q80T to high tier section.
  6. 30/11/2020 - Corrected more mistakes, revamped section prefaces.
  7. 30/11/2020 - Added and edited a lot of Panasonic LCD TVs.
  8. 04/12/2020 - Added elusive 43XH9196 Sony model.
  9. 05/12/2020 - Fixed Philips 55/65 PUS9435 thanks @Lvrhs
  10. Keep remembering and forgetting to add Sony X70xx models, I've now added to the guide but they aren't the best buys presently.
 
Last edited:

Dodgexander

Moderator
I've now opened the guide, its very much still work in process but I must sleep at some point. I will update more when I have time. Beware that there are mistakes and missing info currently.

Also beware that prices will still change as we get closer to Black Friday, so what you read today may be different in a few days time.
 
Thanks, @Dodgexander, this will really help with the Black Friday shopping for everyone!

I am interested in the Hisense 55U7Q but multiple reports of poor motion handling (and one youtube video where that was painfully obvious) have me hesitating a bit.
Anyone who has one knows if that has been improved by fimrware?
(this was the video that really scared me about the Hisense, the motion judder on the left TV here when it pans down the building...
)

And between an Hisense 55U7Q and a PHILIPS 58PUS9005/12, which would be recommended?
I know the Hisense is brighter and better for HDR, and the Philips is not nearly as bright but it should handle motion a lot better supposedly and has the Ambilight feature (which I just think looks cool, haha)
Not worried about upscaling as I have a Nvidia Shield 2019 to handle that...



Working with a budget of around 800 pounds.
(SOOO tempted by Sony KD55XH9005BU and I could just about stretch to it if I wanted, but the stand seems to be too wide for my current furniture, and living in a rental apartment don't want to mess around with furniture or putting a TV on the wall)
 
Last edited:

rauer

Active Member
Brilliant - thank you! A small comment: one part lists TVs sized 49-50" and yet OLEDs sized 48" are listed there.
 

Remustard

Member
Thanks, @Dodgexander, this will really help with the Black Friday shopping for everyone!

I am interested in the Hisense 55U7Q but multiple reports of poor motion handling (and one youtube video where that was painfully obvious) have me hesitating a bit.
Anyone who has one knows if that has been improved by fimrware?
(this was the video that really scared me about the Hisense, the motion judder on the left TV here when it pans down the building...
)

And between an Hisense 55U7Q and a PHILIPS 58PUS9005/12, which would be recommended?
I know the Hisense is brighter and better for HDR, and the Philips is not nearly as bright but it should handle motion a lot better supposedly and has the Ambilight feature (which I just think looks cool, haha)
Not worried about upscaling as I have a Nvidia Shield 2019 to handle that...



Working with a budget of around 800 pounds.
(SOOO tempted by Sony KD55XH9005BU and I could just about stretch to it if I wanted, but the stand seems to be too wide for my current furniture, and living in a rental apartment don't want to mess around with furniture or putting a TV on the wall)

I just bought the 55U8Q from Richer Sounds and they accepted the note on the Costco listing of "Member pricing: A further £59 reduction will be automatically applied at checkout Price valid from 04/11/2020 to 23/11/2020." and reduced the price matched to £739.99. This would be comfortable under your budget. They also said they would give a price match refund if it went even cheaper on Black Friday (no idea if it will or not).
YMMV as I'm not sure if every local RS does this.

I can't comment on the potential issues you mentioned with the Hisense until I have it though.
 

Dodgexander

Moderator
Thanks guys. I've corrected some mistakes and added the TCL 75C815 removing the Samsung 75Q70T.
@Telvina1980 don't judge motion in a video, only way to know for sure is trying the TV. Make sure to buy it from a good retailer so you can return it if you are unhappy with motion.

Every TV has some kind of motion complaint, including the Samsung model in that video next to the Hisense.

Of course I'd always recommend the U7Q above the others, reasoning should be in the guide. It has both local dimming and high peak brightness for a budget set. If those aren't priorities for you then you can go for the Philips instead if you want.

The guide is in order, so the U7Q sits heads above the others, its just simply a lot better than the other TVs despite its shortfalls.

As for the Sony XH9005, that is in a higher range section, so is an all round much better TV. It's always a good idea to save and spend more at a later stage than buy now. Not only do you get a better TV, but you also will buy later on when prices are lower.

The U8Q and U7Q are both very different TVs. The U7Q has a 60hz panel, whilst the U8Q 120hz. The U8Q is also a lot more capable with HDR due to its peak brightness being higher. Both TVs (like many TVs) have their share of motion complaints, but that doesn't mean you'll notice them.

EDIT* @Telvina1980 I'm not sure why you let the type of stand affect your purchase. You can buy universal central stands for any TV. They just screw into the wall mount VESA holes behind the TV. They can be purchased for as little as £20 on Amazon or similar.
 
Thanks guys. I've corrected some mistakes and added the TCL 75C815 removing the Samsung 75Q70T.
@Telvina1980 don't judge motion in a video, only way to know for sure is trying the TV. Make sure to buy it from a good retailer so you can return it if you are unhappy with motion.

Every TV has some kind of motion complaint, including the Samsung model in that video next to the Hisense.

Of course I'd always recommend the U7Q above the others, reasoning should be in the guide. It has both local dimming and high peak brightness for a budget set. If those aren't priorities for you then you can go for the Philips instead if you want.

The guide is in order, so the U7Q sits heads above the others, its just simply a lot better than the other TVs despite its shortfalls.

As for the Sony XH9005, that is in a higher range section, so is an all round much better TV. It's always a good idea to save and spend more at a later stage than buy now. Not only do you get a better TV, but you also will buy later on when prices are lower.

The U8Q and U7Q are both very different TVs. The U7Q has a 60hz panel, whilst the U8Q 120hz. The U8Q is also a lot more capable with HDR due to its peak brightness being higher. Both TVs (like many TVs) have their share of motion complaints, but that doesn't mean you'll notice them.

EDIT* @Telvina1980 I'm not sure why you let the type of stand affect your purchase. You can buy universal central stands for any TV. They just screw into the wall mount VESA holes behind the TV. They can be purchased for as little as £20 on Amazon or similar.

I did not know you could buy universal stands?!
DOH! 🤦‍♂️

And gah. now you're making me look at the XH9005 or the U8Q instead of the U7Q..

Thanks, @Dodgexander, you're awesome for taking the time to put this all together and reply to our (infinite) queries!
 

Newguy356

Member
Quick question about the U7Q. If you are using an Amazon fire stick or Roku or even a PlayStation does that mean that this model won’t have any motion issues?
 

The Dark Horse

Well-known Member
I notice the Sony KD-65XH9005 won What Hi-Fi awards 2020 best buy in the latest issue as best 65" TV under £2000. How come they didn't recommend the higher rated 65XH9505? Also how come the 9005 is getting the HDMI 2.1 update and the 9505 isn't?


Upper Mid tier
These models will get you half way there with HDR, they have better upscaling than cheaper TVs and more up to date/future proof HDMI connectivity.
Spoiler: LCD TVs with narrow viewing angles, but better contrast, blacks and dark room/scene performance

1. Sony 65XH9005 / 65XH9096 / 65XH9296 - HDMI 2.1, good motion with its 120hz panel, around 750 nits peak brightness. Some HDR titles will look better than others.

High tier
This is where HDR starts to get really good and the minimum I would go for if you want good HDR. In the case of the OLEDs listed, even those not using much HDR content will see the most gains in picture quality all-around due to OLED tech.
Spoiler: OLED TVs
Spoiler: LCD TVs

2. Sony 65XH9505 - The best value high end LCD TV. Great motion, upscaling, HDR performance. Wider viewing angles and improved Android TV.
 

jimjiber

Standard Member
I hope the 55Q90T drops to £1099 or less because then I will finally take the plunge. I don't think my viewing puts me at high OLED burn in risk but for the sake of slightly blacker blacks I would rather not take the risk.
 

Dodgexander

Moderator
Quick question about the U7Q. If you are using an Amazon fire stick or Roku or even a PlayStation does that mean that this model won’t have any motion issues?
Like any motion problem reported with any TV (not just Hisense) it will depend on so many factors. Your sources, your own objective view of its motion and the kind of content you watch. Sometimes motion issues are less apparent using an external source, sometimes they are more apparent. You'll have to try and see.
I notice the Sony KD-65XH9005 won What Hi-Fi awards 2020 best buy in the latest issue as best 65" TV under £2000. How come they didn't recommend the higher rated 65XH9505? Also how come the 9005 is getting the HDMI 2.1 update and the 9505 isn't?
You can ask them. My guess is they don't take pricing into consideration, didn't view much HDR content on the TV or they didn't review the XH9505 so they are happy to recommend an inferior TV. They are not review experts anyway, and only review things by eye so I wouldn't personally trust their reviews so much. The XH9505 uses a dedicated video chipset for picture processing. Its the use of that chip that restricts HDMI 2.1. The cheaper XH9005 model doesn't use a dedicated chip, so it doesn't have this limitation.
You can see they reviewed last years XG9505 as 5 stars: Sony KD-65XG9505 review its practically the same TV as the new XH9505.

The key thing to think about when choosing whether to buy a high tier model or not is HDR. HDR requires a set of specifications that aren't met by cheaper TVs like the XH9005, so you will have problems in some titles due to reduced peak brightness. You may be okay with that though if you don't use HDR very much.
 

James Casey

Standard Member
Thanks for this, perfect timing for many, I'm sure!

One thing, I think the LG BX65 has 2 each of HDMI 2.0 and 2.1 sockets, at least according to the listings I've seen.
 

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