New Job - Calculating Remaining Holiday Entitlement

WillyShatsWig

Active Member
My other half's work's new financial year is November 1st to October 31st.
She started beginning of July.
That's 4 months (July, August, September and October).
She is entitled to 28 days holiday pro rata, including bank holidays.

I calculate (as does Calculate holiday entitlement - GOV.UK) that she is entited to 9.3 days holiday.
28 / 4 = 9.3

Hew new workplace's HR calculate it as ((20 days / 12 months) * 4 months) + remaining Bank Holidays.
((20 / 12) * 4) + 1 (Aug 28th) = 7.7

They state this is how Sage Payroll calculates it.

Can they do this?
 

MrSossidge

Distinguished Member
Assuming this is a standard 5 day working week and she is not required to work bank holidays.

So really, her holiday entitlement is 20days off paid by the company and 8 statutory fixed paid bank holidays. So they divide up the 20 days as they have done and then she will have the bank holiday off as well which is the Aug 28th. You are calculating it as if she can choose when to take the bank holidays which, of course, she can't and as there is only 1 left between now and the start of the new financial year then 7.7 is correct.
 

WillyShatsWig

Active Member
Thank you. It's now been explained to me that essentially it's 20 days holiday + 8 days Bank Holiday. Not 28 days holiday that include Bank Holidays. So that now makes sense.

Strange that Gov.uk website calculates it that way though.
 

nheather

Distinguished Member
Thank you. It's now been explained to me that essentially it's 20 days holiday + 8 days Bank Holiday. Not 28 days holiday that include Bank Holidays. So that now makes sense.

Strange that Gov.uk website calculates it that way though.
They generally do a calculation like the first one when the person is not working mon-fri. Say someone works three days (tue, weds, thursday), or works five days but has to cover the weekends and public holidays (like police, firemen, nurses etc.), since most public holidays fall on a Monday they would lose out. Conversely, someone working three days (mon, weds, fri) would end up getting most public holidays. So in these cases they include the public holidays in the pro-rata calculation to be converted into annual leave - though a company may insist that you use annual leave for public holidays falling on a day that you would normally work.

Many part time workers that I know deliberately choose Monday as a non-working day and then Friday for two reasons - the main one is that it extends the weekends but also because the pro-rata public holiday becomes annual leave that for the most part they are free to take whenever they want.

Cheers,

Nigel
 

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