New House, Difficult Living Room

Discussion in 'Home Cinema Building DIY' started by SuperSam, Aug 6, 2018.

  1. SuperSam

    SuperSam
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    Good morning

    As you can see from the title we are in a new house and we have a difficult living room to mount a 5.0.2 system (that's right, no sub, my Keilidhs are more than enough to sonicly satisfy my need to hear the Millennium Falcon fail to make the jump to hyper space).

    It is a Victorian end of terrace. The MLP is the centre of the sofa which is between the kitchen door & the back door. (The sofa currently blocks the back door) I'm competent enough to tackle the fronts but the rears are proving to be difficult. So the problem being, if I mount them at ear height the will prevent the doors from opening...

    So I'm thinking in-wall speakers... what do we think about these things in proper brick and plasterboard walls? Are they similar to fitting electric face plate boxes just bigger? Are they deeper? Do I need to worry about my neighbour and her extensive plate collection vibrating off the wall from the volume of them?
    Joking aside the system is really only used for evening viewing and is not at what I would call a loud volume.

    Ideas will be greatfully received.
     
  2. jamieu

    jamieu
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    Short answer: It varies
    Longer answer: Depends on the speaker. Most will need somewhere between an 80mm to 100mm recess and many are designed to be mounted in a plasterboard cavity rather than a solid brick wall. Some will come with their own back boxes, while others are open framed and expect you to build the sealed back-boxes yourself to a specified volume out of wood/framework; this will likely increase the depth you need.

    Take a look at the installation manuals for some of the more popular in-wall manufactures.
    This video shows one kind of fixing/mounting where the speaker is tightened and clamped against the plasterboard. Some have dedicated back-boxes similar to an electrical back-box which the speaker then slots into, while other simply have a 'lip' that is screwed to the face of the wall itself.

    Step by Step video tutorial Genelec AIW26B...


    As for sound, a well built and installed in-wall should sound pretty much as good as a similar spec standalone speaker. Although you'll be limited in how much you can toe-in your speakers if installing in a flat wall. Where things fall down in when people install open framed in-walls without constructing an appropriately sized and sealed back box. There's also a lot of budget/low-end in-walls designed for kitchens, bathrooms and retail spaces, fine for background listening but not ideal for your main speakers.

    Although you say you don't want/need a sub, you may actually be better off using one to solve this issue and improving your overall sound.

    By offloading the low-end duties to the sub and away from the in-wall speakers—which will likely be limited in how low they can perform anyway due to cabinet size—you'll be reducing the omni-directional bass frequencies most likely to travel directly though the shared wall and annoy your neighbour. Obv. the same frequencies will still be output via your sub, but you can place your sub further away from the party wall. Doesn't need to be an earth shaker, but by moving the low end duties away from the in-walls you may find you have a bigger choice of speakers and possibly happier neighbours.
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2018
  3. Navvie

    Navvie
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    Monitor Audio also make in-wall and in-ceiling speakers with back boxes. They're pretty good in my experience.
     

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