New home network

Discussion in 'Networking & NAS' started by Mr_London, Feb 8, 2009.

  1. Mr_London

    Mr_London
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    Hello all,

    just bought a house that needs a bit of work doing to it, I'm going to rewire the whole place (dont worry i am an electrician), but i thought this is a good opportunity to install a a decent wired network.

    Telephone point /modem is in cupboard under-stairs

    Have a PS3 and computer usually in use downstairs / computer and printer in office upstairs.
    And maybe 1 or 2 network cameras.

    whats best way to wire? Cat6 to every machine? All back to hub understairs?

    All comments and advice gratefully received
     
  2. t72bogie

    t72bogie
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    yep - just run shielded ethernet to every room where you want it, then get a good 24 port gig switch under the stairs...Netgear do some affordable, but reliable models ...loads of new houses are being done like this now - pre-wired and you just stick your own switch in :smashin:
     
  3. Mr_London

    Mr_London
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    what sort of cable should i run cat5e or cat6 or cat7?
     
  4. Pengbo

    Pengbo
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    How far is the longest run going to be?

    If the answer is anything less than 100/150 meters then CAT5e UTP of FTP cable will be more than good enough. It's rated at somewhere over 1000Mbit so will handle just about anything most home networks will get used for.

    Make sure you use solid core and not stranded (used for patch cables) as you can buy either in 305M boxes and the later will not be so great.
     
  5. Mr_London

    Mr_London
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    longest run will be about 25m

    so will Cat5e be good enough to stream HD movies from my mac to my PS3 and TV?
     
  6. Kristian

    Kristian
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    Yes, Cat5e supports 1000Mb/s (1Gb/s) up to 100m, which is way more then necessary. HD can be done with 100Mb/s with room to spare.



    Except 10/100/1000 Ethernet is spec'd to 100m on Cat5e, not 150m.
     
  7. Mr_London

    Mr_London
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    So what is cat6 and cat 7 speeds?

    thanks for all this information, its been an education :)
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 10, 2009
  8. Gadgetcity

    Gadgetcity
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    Cat6 is designed for 1000Mb/s (1Gb/s) but may manage 10,000Mb/s (10Gb/s)
    Cat6a should do 10Gb/s
    Cat7 does 10Gb/s and manages 100Gb/s up to about 50m

    You won't be using these higher speeds at home though as most equipment only supports up to 1Gb/s :)

    All speeds are length dependant and the max speed over 100m is normally quoted.

    I would use Cat5e as it is cheap and light which means it can run vertically with less chance of stretching under it's own weight. (Cat6 is often fatter and can use thicker copper)
     
  9. Kristian

    Kristian
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    These are cabling standards, not Ethernet standards. The higher Category cables allow a higher carrier frequency to run over them with improved signal loss/deterioration qualities than the lower categories. The higher carrier frequency usually means you can get more data down the cable. It's a system too so all the plugs, sockets, patch panels and patch leads need to be of the same category to be called, say, Cat6. Not only that but the cables have to be installed in a particular way to ensure it's still within, say cat6, spec.

    As Gadgetcity says above:

    I don't believe Cat6 has been ratified for 10Gb/s but it has been used for this but Cat6a is okay of 10Gb/s at 100m.

    I believe that Cat7 is ratified for 10Gb/s over 100m and progress is being made for it to run 100Gb/s over 70m now with 100m expected by 2013, according to wiki.

    Kris.
     

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