New DG starts his work at the BBC today

hodg100

Distinguished Member
Invites staff to voice their views

The BBC welcomes in a new Director General today, Tony Hall, who is promising to restore the public's trust in the wake of the Jimmy Saville scandals. Hall believes the best days of the BBC are still ahead of the corporation, with a spot of imagination and hard work.

Mr Hall sent and email to all of the BBC's employees, in which he outlines a number of questions the BBC needs to address over the coming months and he sees their views as key in developing the broadcasters' future. The new DG will review these themes with the BBC Trust and then set out his thinking in the autumn.



Copy of the email below:

BBC Press Office

All-staff email
Subject: The BBC's best days lie ahead of us

Dear All,

It is a great honour to start today as Director-General of the BBC. This is a very special organisation. It enriches millions of lives every day, here and the world over. It provokes strong opinions because people care passionately about it. The BBC has a unique history, a special place in the country's heart and a vital part to play in its future. So I have a very real sense of the responsibility that comes with the role.

Recent times have been difficult for the BBC, but obviously far more so for those directly affected by these events. We are learning the lessons and thanks to the hard work of staff across the organisation under Tim's excellent leadership, the BBC has moved forward. We are now winning back trust, something which will always be the most precious commodity for our organisation. We must never take it for granted.

I am confident about the future for the BBC for two key reasons: the calibre and quality of its people and the values we all share.

It is my job to enable you to do the best work of your lives, producing outstanding programmes and services, and to remove the distractions that get in the way of that ambition. The BBC sets incredibly high standards. At our best we provide a service like no other. Our challenge is to perform at our best all of the time.

In the coming weeks, I will set out how we can all shape the next chapter for the BBC as we move towards our centenary in 2022. Later this year I will share my thinking with the Trust before outlining our new ambitions for the BBC. We will need to make the most compelling case possible by listening to our audiences and partners, and building on our many strengths.

We have a unique opportunity to work together to shape the future of public service broadcasting. The kind of questions we need to ask ourselves include:

  • How can we further improve the quality and distinctiveness of our programmes?
  • How can we get closer to our audiences so they can get the content they want, when and how they want it?
  • How can we build an ever more creative and dynamic organisation where the best creative talents want to work?
  • What are the next big trends in technology and consumption that we need to grasp as we did with BBC Online and iPlayer?
  • How can we act as a catalyst for creative and digital economies, a global champion for the UK and a source of future jobs?
  • How can we make more of the BBC brand and content in the global marketplace?
  • How can we improve what it is like to work at the BBC?
  • How can we meet all of these ambitions within the means of the Licence Fee?
  • There are obviously other big questions and we must address them all whilst adapting to the ways in which Britain, its society, nations and regions are changing.

Critically this means me listening to you. Over the coming months I want to hear your thoughts about this next stage of our journey. I will be getting out around the BBC as much as possible.

I am proud to be leading the BBC as we start this next chapter together. We have always been pioneers. As we move towards our centenary it is a time for the BBC to be self-confident and optimistic about the future. You produce brilliant programmes and content, day in, day out. There can be no complacency but I firmly believe with imagination and hard work the BBC's best days lie ahead of us.

Best wishes,

Tony Hall. Director-General

VIA: BBC
 

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Nevaborn

Well-known Member
He needs to think less about peoples trust and more on what he's spending their money on. We have Dr Who currently, Sherlock when it arrives and of course Top Gear but apart from that the BBC has no big shows. Saturday nights and all through the week its abysmal.

I hate to be a bit sexist and apologise but it seems like its all just baking and dancing all the time. Wheres the action, drama, fun ... Masterchef can only keep me entertained so much in a week. We used to have Red Dwarf and Robot Wars etc, stuff that was fun to watch.... What do I see advertised now ... Sewing. Chuck it on bbc4 if you must but seriously they need to do something fast.
 

The Eggman72

Active Member
I hate to be a bit sexist and apologise but it seems like its all just baking and dancing all the time. Wheres the action, drama, fun ... Masterchef can only keep me entertained so much in a week.

Agreed and moving house programs & dire quiz shows...the exact reason I dont watch UK terrestrial tv...
 

Steven

Senior Moderator
Part of the cost-cutting resulted from the BBC spending millions moving to Salford when no-one except the-then Labour government cared about diversifying outside of London. The issue is not moving per se but the continuing cost of the move, including paying for travel between the NW and London. In the private sector staff would not receive subsidised taxi and rail fares to attend part-time at the office. Relocate or look for another job.
 

Nevaborn

Well-known Member
Steven said:
Part of the cost-cutting resulted from the BBC spending millions moving to Salford when no-one except the-then Labour government cared about diversifying outside of London. The issue is not moving per se but the continuing cost of the move, including paying for travel between the NW and London. In the private sector staff would not receive subsidised taxi and rail fares to attend part-time at the office. Relocate or look for another job.

I still think its a travesty moving them.

Then again I always think a compulsory tv license to fund the BBC even if you don't watch tv and just game or watch movies is very unfair. Especially as you can still currently watch iPlayer without a tv license.

Id suggest a subscription based route but to even maintain current funding levels they would need to charge more than the like of Netflix and more compared to Sky in relation to the amount of programming available.
 

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