New Arcam AVR's

Thatsnotmynaim

Distinguished Member
I think Arcam (like Naim) use a floating earth in their design, this is meant to help make them sound better but can leave it susceptible to noise being introduced by other devices. As I say Naim is exactly the same and to people uneducated on the Naim way (and Arcam) it can seem frustrating as they’ve never had to consider it before with other makes. When you know it matters and how to reduce / solve it by ensuring your connected devices aren’t introducing noise and by using (I think) ungrounded XLR cables (there’s two types ground connected and ungrounded) you should reduce your issues. I connected a streamer and that created hum, the issue was the streamer not the amp, yet I didn’t get the issue on a Denon AVR. The Denon design being different hides the issue, Naim/Arcam doesn’t. Separate to this I’ve found I can also much more easily introduce issues with RCA’s (even short) if the cables are routed out the back near other noisey devices or cables, say power leads etc, if you can route the RCA’s away from things that may interfere you can get much better results. I found just moving the RCA’s a few inches near or away from power leads can be the difference to being silent or having tweeter noise / hiss. Now I try and dress my cables carefully I find I get zero issues. Occasionally I’ll have a quick shift around of an amp and find I’ve unintentionally introduced an issue by accidentally routing a cable by something I shouldn’t. It’s not necessarily an Arcam fault but a design choice people may need to understand and appreciate.
 

Marvin the Android

Well-known Member
I think Arcam (like Naim) use a floating earth in their design, this is meant to help make them sound better but can leave it susceptible to noise being introduced by other devices. As I say Naim is exactly the same and to people uneducated on the Naim way (and Arcam) it can seem frustrating as they’ve never had to consider it before with other makes. When you know it matters and how to reduce / solve it by ensuring your connected devices aren’t introducing noise and by using (I think) ungrounded XLR cables (there’s two types ground connected and ungrounded) you should reduce your issues. I connected a streamer and that created hum, the issue was the streamer not the amp, yet I didn’t get the issue on a Denon AVR. The Denon design being different hides the issue, Naim/Arcam doesn’t. Separate to this I’ve found I can also much more easily introduce issues with RCA’s (even short) if the cables are routed out the back near other noisey devices or cables, say power leads etc, if you can route the RCA’s away from things that may interfere you can get much better results. I found just moving the RCA’s a few inches near or away from power leads can be the difference to being silent or having tweeter noise / hiss. Now I try and dress my cables carefully I find I get zero issues. Occasionally I’ll have a quick shift around of an amp and find I’ve unintentionally introduced an issue by accidentally routing a cable by something I shouldn’t. It’s not necessarily an Arcam fault but a design choice people may need to understand and appreciate.
Which all points to terrible design decisions by Arcam.

1. Naim equipment is really intended to be used with other Naim equipment. When Arcam offer UHD players, projectors, Video processors then maybe their approach could be argued but good designers design for the environment that they are going to be used in and not an ideal world. Arcam Processors should be interoperable with most commonly used equipment without problems. As you say Denon seem to have managed it.

2. Nowhere in the rubbish Arcam documentation do they say that XLR cables should be ungrounded. Almost all cables will be produced with the ground connected unless specified otherwise. If Arcam want to deviate away from the usual convention they should clearly say so.

3. As for noise on the RCAs well designed equipment should be tolerant of the amounts of noise typically present in the intended environment which is a domestic property. This combined with the noise issues I have found you get when there is no load on the WiFi/Bluetooth connections and through unused inputs again points to inadequate shielding/screening/noise rejection in the design.

I agree that these do not indicate faults as such but what they do show is poor design choices given the target environment. If people need to understand and or appreciate them then Arcam should be a tad more open and honest about the limitations caused by their design choices. Suggesting that people with problems need to understand and appreciate them is a bit disingenuous, slightly insulting and in my opinion overly apologetic for Arcam. It just seems to be that in order to get a better sound quality than some of the mass market equipment Arcam haven't been able to design any better they have just had to make poor design decisions instead.

I am even more interested in trying an Anthem now as if reports are to be believed they have managed to get a similar sound quality to the Arcams at a lower price point and without the design compromises that Arcam seem to have made to get to such quality.

Just my thoughts anyway but the design choices and the problems they have created aren't really worth the apparent sound quality benefits. I suspect that Arcam have been playing the 80/20 game in that the 80 without issues will laud the sound quality and the 20 with problems isn't a big enough number for them to give a damn about. Seemingly being in the 20 camp this does rather suck if I am honest. At least it explains their rubbish attitude to some customers if they consider the 20 to be written off anyway and are only interested in helping the 80.
 

rccarguy2

Well-known Member
Which all points to terrible design decisions by Arcam.

1. Naim equipment is really intended to be used with other Naim equipment. When Arcam offer UHD players, projectors, Video processors then maybe their approach could be argued but good designers design for the environment that they are going to be used in and not an ideal world. Arcam Processors should be interoperable with most commonly used equipment without problems. As you say Denon seem to have managed it.

2. Nowhere in the rubbish Arcam documentation do they say that XLR cables should be ungrounded. Almost all cables will be produced with the ground connected unless specified otherwise. If Arcam want to deviate away from the usual convention they should clearly say so.

3. As for noise on the RCAs well designed equipment should be tolerant of the amounts of noise typically present in the intended environment which is a domestic property. This combined with the noise issues I have found you get when there is no load on the WiFi/Bluetooth connections and through unused inputs again points to inadequate shielding/screening/noise rejection in the design.

I agree that these do not indicate faults as such but what they do show is poor design choices given the target environment. If people need to understand and or appreciate them then Arcam should be a tad more open and honest about the limitations caused by their design choices. Suggesting that people with problems need to understand and appreciate them is a bit disingenuous, slightly insulting and in my opinion overly apologetic for Arcam. It just seems to be that in order to get a better sound quality than some of the mass market equipment Arcam haven't been able to design any better they have just had to make poor design decisions instead.

I am even more interested in trying an Anthem now as if reports are to be believed they have managed to get a similar sound quality to the Arcams at a lower price point and without the design compromises that Arcam seem to have made to get to such quality.

Just my thoughts anyway but the design choices and the problems they have created aren't really worth the apparent sound quality benefits. I suspect that Arcam have been playing the 80/20 game in that the 80 without issues will laud the sound quality and the 20 with problems isn't a big enough number for them to give a damn about. Seemingly being in the 20 camp this does rather suck if I am honest. At least it explains their rubbish attitude to some customers if they consider the 20 to be written off anyway and are only interested in helping the 80.

When arcam attempted to refute amir's bench tests arcam used a signal generator that was powered by isolated battery, not ac power, so that difference made arcams tests didn't show up ground loop and poor performance as amir's did...but no one uses isolated equipment like that in people's homes
 

Marvin the Android

Well-known Member
When arcam attempted to refute amir's bench tests arcam used a signal generator that was powered by isolated battery, not ac power, so that difference made arcams tests didn't show up ground loop and poor performance as amir's did...but no one uses isolated equipment like that in people's homes
Exactly! When 99.99% of people use isolated batteries then Arcam may have a point but when everyone uses AC power they should design to that and not just to a perfect AC power quality but the quality that is present in most environments.

I was always taught at school that a good designer designs for the real world and not a perfect world. I think this is very much true and very appropriate here.
 

CaroleBaskin

Well-known Member
I am even more interested in trying an Anthem now as if reports are to be believed they have managed to get a similar sound quality to the Arcams at a lower price point and without the design compromises that Arcam seem to have made to get to such quality.
By that logic I’d wait for Onkyo and Pioneer, they might be better value still and possibly sound as good with Dirac on board. Anthem wait time will probably line up with their release anyway :laugh:
 

Thatsnotmynaim

Distinguished Member
You shouldn’t need to use isolated batteries, but if the source that’s connected to the ac mains introduces something bad then that’s the source that’s at fault not strictly the amp for showing it up. Should you design your amp to hide the bad sources issue, maybe, but if hiding the source’s problem makes your amp not sound so good, well then it becomes a design decision. Just because others design their amps to hide crud source issues is not Arcams fault, it’s just a quirk more than a broken amp. Should I design my amp with compromises so it will play nicely with crap sources or not cause headaches for people with low tolerance thresholds, maybe, maybe not?!?

Naim amps are not designed to just work with Naim kit, that’s just rollocks, where did that generalisation come from? I thought Naim were originally designed to work well with Linn turntables and up until a few months back Naim never made a turntable.

With regards XLR grounding, I’m no expert, but I think Pin1 is generally used for signal grounding, the case grounding is not signal grounding and is optional and I think most do not use it as it can create issues unless your kit is designed for it. I think it is far more uncommon for the shell grounding to be used, so ‘maybe’ the Arcam just works best with the majority of XLR’s rather than the minority. I’m not sure to be honest, I know many that bought and used bog standard XLR cables had no issues as they were shell ungrounded.

I’d say active digital speakers is also probably a less common setup, so may need some careful thought on how to put it together rather than just being whacked together and hoping for the best. I suspect most with that level of equipment would get the dealer to install it, set it up and not leave until working 100%. If your dealer is not helping then that’s where I’d point the finger first, I think the Arcam kit when first sold as FMJ iteration included the dealer installing and setting it up in the price, however as is today most want keen pricing / big discounts first and so are happy to not have the install. Not sure if the HDA range is the same, but I’m sure if you paid full price then a dealer would set it up no problem.

Higher end kit is often less plug and play, that’s not to say you can’t do it yourself if you have the knowledge, but the Arcam is not quite as easy as Denon if you don’t have the tech expertise. I guess a car analogy could be, not many buy a Ferrari and service it themselves..
 

Marvin the Android

Well-known Member
You shouldn’t need to use isolated batteries, but if the source that’s connected to the ac mains introduces something bad then that’s the source that’s at fault not strictly the amp for showing it up. Should you design your amp to hide the bad sources issue, maybe, but if hiding the source’s problem makes your amp not sound so good, well then it becomes a design decision. Just because others design their amps to hide crud source issues is not Arcams fault, it’s just a quirk more than a broken amp. Should I design my amp with compromises so it will play nicely with crap sources or not cause headaches for people with low tolerance thresholds, maybe, maybe not?!?

Naim amps are not designed to just work with Naim kit, that’s just rollocks, where did that generalisation come from? I thought Naim were originally designed to work well with Linn turntables and up until a few months back Naim never made a turntable.

With regards XLR grounding, I’m no expert, but I think Pin1 is generally used for signal grounding, the case grounding is not signal grounding and is optional and I think most do not use it as it can create issues unless your kit is designed for it. I think it is far more uncommon for the shell grounding to be used, so ‘maybe’ the Arcam just works best with the majority of XLR’s rather than the minority. I’m not sure to be honest, I know many that bought and used bog standard XLR cables had no issues as they were shell ungrounded.

I’d say active digital speakers is also probably a less common setup, so may need some careful thought on how to put it together rather than just being whacked together and hoping for the best. I suspect most with that level of equipment would get the dealer to install it, set it up and not leave until working 100%. If your dealer is not helping then that’s where I’d point the finger first, I think the Arcam kit when first sold as FMJ iteration included the dealer installing and setting it up in the price, however as is today most want keen pricing / big discounts first and so are happy to not have the install. Not sure if the HDA range is the same, but I’m sure if you paid full price then a dealer would set it up no problem.

Higher end kit is often less plug and play, that’s not to say you can’t do it yourself if you have the knowledge, but the Arcam is not quite as easy as Denon if you don’t have the tech expertise. I guess a car analogy could be, not many buy a Ferrari and service it themselves..
So what exactly is my source introducing then given that it works with pretty much anything that isn't an Arcam? I will also add that connection to my projector doesn't seem to help either. Are you suggesting that Oppo players (2 of them), AppleTV/FireStick/Roku, JVC Projectors and Lumagen Video processors are all so badly designed and any problems are down to them and not the design choices of Arcam? If there is one thing that is 'rollocks' it is that.

As for Naim you aren't really comparing like for like. Naim systems are generally sold by boutique specialists as a complete system and 2 channel ones at that. They might use other manufactures turntables and speakers but usually you get Naim pre-amps, Naim power-amps, Naim PSUs etc together as one. The Arcam is sold as a commodity item to pair with other components. If they were sold as complete systems by boutique retailers then things might be different and I would be unlikely to be having my problems. You simply can't compare Naims ecosystem to the Arcam. Do you have any other more relevant comparisons? You might notice that the more traditional retailers that sell things like the Naim Muso don't really carry other Naim components, there is a reason for this.

As for Arcam being high-end lets just say that they want to be high end and yet still compete in a mass market world but don't seem to be very effective at it. You don't find Pioneer/Onkyo/Denon/Marantz/Yamaha using the same restrictive retail channels as Trinnov/Storm/DataSat/Lyngdorf and you don't find Trinnov/Storm/DataSat/Lyngdorf being sold at the likes of Richer Sounds.
 

Marvin the Android

Well-known Member
I’d say active digital speakers is also probably a less common setup, so may need some careful thought on how to put it together rather than just being whacked together and hoping for the best. I suspect most with that level of equipment would get the dealer to install it, set it up and not leave until working 100%. If your dealer is not helping then that’s where I’d point the finger first, I think the Arcam kit when first sold as FMJ iteration included the dealer installing and setting it up in the price, however as is today most want keen pricing / big discounts first and so are happy to not have the install. Not sure if the HDA range is the same, but I’m sure if you paid full price then a dealer would set it up no problem.
I didn't whack my system together thank you very much so I would appreciate it if you would cut the baiting out.

My dealer didn't install and setup anything due to lockdown. You might have heard about it and I didn't expect anything in the way of discounts in lieu of not having things installed so kindly keep your ignorant assumptions to yourself.

I am honestly not sure if you are interested in participating in a discussion or start an argument so we are probably done here.
 

CaroleBaskin

Well-known Member
When arcam attempted to refute amir's bench tests arcam used a signal generator that was powered by isolated battery, not ac power, so that difference made arcams tests didn't show up ground loop and poor performance as amir's did...but no one uses isolated equipment like that in people's homes
Is it mentioned that the variac used is isolated with battery power and not mains? Admittedly I’ve not read it. When I spoke with Arcam about PSU buzz they mentioned they test with a very expensive variac on mains power, so perhaps they have one for best specification rating reasons alone and one for testing faulty devices?
 

CaroleBaskin

Well-known Member
@Marvin the Android I think he probably has far more value to add to any conversation than most of us. He has an AV40 like yourself, uses various products alongside it including your mentioned JVC projector…

Id be asking why he isn’t experiencing issues and weighing up a replacement, perhaps asking your dealer that if it is replaced you want a refund condition if it’s problematic within X days. I’m sure your dealer will be open to that given how many problems you’ve had.

I get your frustration, I had my own with a bunch of their AVR’s!
 

BlackSpider777

Active Member
I didn't whack my system together thank you very much so I would appreciate it if you would cut the baiting out.

My dealer didn't install and setup anything due to lockdown. You might have heard about it and I didn't expect anything in the way of discounts in lieu of not having things installed so kindly keep your ignorant assumptions to yourself.

I am honestly not sure if you are interested in participating in a discussion or start an argument so we are probably done here.
Hey, i think you are going over the top now, He is one of the most helpful members in the FMJ & HDA forums, i think you should just sell your unit & get the Anthem instead?
I had issues with certain brands which were isolated to myself so i sold it & MOVED ON.
For ex- i had an Anthem MCA225 power amp that made these thud sounds from the speakers during Power On/Off, according to Anthem this was a design feature & not a flaw, many users are ok with it but it was something i couldn't live with. I sold it & moved on.
Suggest you do the same as thats the best thing to do.

Cheers.
 
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Marvin the Android

Well-known Member
Hey, i think you are going over the top now, He is one of the most helpful members in the FMJ & HDA forums, i think you should just sell your unit & get the Anthem instead?
I had issues with certain brands which were isolated to myself so i sold it & MOVED ON.
For ex- i had an Anthem MCA225 power amp that made these thud sounds from the speakers during Power On/Off, according to Anthem this was a design feature & not a flaw, many users are ok with it but it was something i couldn't live with. I sold it & moved on.
Suggest you do the same as thats the best thing to do.

Cheers.
Over the top? I was just responding to the comments directed at me.

I take your point though that this isn't a thread for resolving issues so I should just move on.
 

Marvin the Android

Well-known Member
@Marvin the Android I think he probably has far more value to add to any conversation than most of us. He has an AV40 like yourself, uses various products alongside it including your mentioned JVC projector…

Id be asking why he isn’t experiencing issues and weighing up a replacement, perhaps asking your dealer that if it is replaced you want a refund condition if it’s problematic within X days. I’m sure your dealer will be open to that given how many problems you’ve had.

I get your frustration, I had my own with a bunch of their AVR’s!
With all due respect suggesting I am just throwing my system together, that it's the problem of Oppo, JVC and Lumagen and that I am getting what I deserve by cheaping out on installation cost isn't really adding any value.

Neither I suppose is labouring the many problems I have with the Arcam that I haven't had with other AVRs/Pre. So I will leave everyone to it.
 

rccarguy2

Well-known Member
When I changed from Lexicon DC-2 to Rotel AV pre I got lots of noise from the speakers, so something up with the Rotel..maybe same issue with floating ground? It didn't have three pin IEC connector at the back, just two core mains cable. Are the Arcams the same, does that make any difference
 

Thatsnotmynaim

Distinguished Member
So what exactly is my source introducing then given that it works with pretty much anything that isn't an Arcam? I will also add that connection to my projector doesn't seem to help either. Are you suggesting that Oppo players (2 of them), AppleTV/FireStick/Roku, JVC Projectors and Lumagen Video processors are all so badly designed and any problems are down to them and not the design choices of Arcam?
I'm not 100% sure what your issue is or issues are, I have some suspicions as have experienced many myself over many decades of HiFi / AV obsession, however you seem to have little patience to work with anyone trying to genuinely help so it’s tricky to get to the bottom of your issue(s) which may be a quite in depth multiple path diagnosis rather than a quick just do ABC.

The design choice of Naim and Arcam is the same as many other great HiFi manufacturers and happens to be the design choice Meridian employ as well. The reason many decide between chassis ground or signal ground (aka floating) is floating can give better sound, lower noise (if no other issues), more bass, with faster pace, rhythm & timing. Yes, Arcam and others choice is not the same as many mass-produced Japanese AVRs but then neither is Naim, Meridian and I suspect people like NAD, Rotel etc. The issue with this type of design is it can sometimes need a bit more careful partnering setup or understanding else you can introduce noise via various methods. Noise can often be introduced through ground loops with partnering kit and they also sometimes seem to be more susceptible to interference noise (emi/rfi etc). Naim for instance with their ground have a star earth, where only one device is meant to be grounded and that is shared as the common signal ground. If you then introduce multiple points of grounding you can then have amp humming issues due to ground loops. I think Meridian speakers do exactly the same design with their speakers having star earth so that could be a potential #1 cause but I’m not 100% sure. I suspect they are designed to be connected to kit in a specific way or expect the connected kit to have certain signal grounding, non-grounding or earthing setup.
The thing with these issues is you tend to need to work through them as it's not easy to know which bit of kit needs what, so try different things to rule things in and out and this is where a dealer may help as they may have kit to hand to try things very quickly and easily and may also have alot of background knowledge to know what to try and what to not try.

If you have connected the Arcam to the Meridian using XLR’s with the cable having the chassis ground connected (case) as well as the signal ground (pin 1), I’d point to this first as a prime factor of introducing a ground loop as the majority of XLRs do not connect chassis ground just signal ground. You can buy these cables cheaply from Amazon to try the theory as XLRs by design do not need to be fancy or expsensive and if bought direct from Amazon you’ll usually have zero issues returning if you try them and they do not work. It’s not always easy to tell if a cable you have or want ot buy will be supplied with chassis ground connected or not, but I think not connected is more common. You can often unwind the XLR flexy end by the cable and see if there is a cable connected or not. The great thing with XLRs is that if there is also a source of interference where you cables will route and pick up external signals then the XLRs will pick this interference up twice as both a positive and negative version and these will then be cancelled out if both ends are balanced. So having XLR with grounding the opposite to what your cables have now may reduce chance of a ground loop and also they'll naturally cancel out any (emi/rfi) interference.

RCAs can also still carry ground loops and if this is the case then you need to solve the cause of the ground loop, however RCAs can also be much more susceptible to interference (emi/rfi etc) hence why if you have XLRs that may help stop that much more easily.

If I were you I’d work out if you have ground loops or interference or a mix of the two. Ground loops will generally stay constant and can be very obvious depending on which bit of kit is picking it up – if an amp picks it up it will be very obvious, if a bit of kit pre-volume picks it up it may be less obvious. Interference generally will always change with volume if picked up pre-volume. However in your case you are very unusual as you are effectively running two volume controls in serial, i.e. you run the Arcam AV40 at full whack / 0db (this is not mainstream) and you then have a second volume control in your Meridian kit further downstream, so the same rules that apply with one volume control may not always be the same for you depending on where the source of your issues lie or what is being affected.

If I have something not connected perfectly in one of my setups that has a HiFi amp set to HT bypass, I effectively have similar to you but the other way round, i.e. two volume controls, but in my case the HiFi amp is set to full whack / 0db not the AV pre. In an instance where you have a pre-amp set to full whack / 0db, if there is any noise (through ground loop or interference) it can be vastly exaggerated by the fact one of the volume controls is set to full. Even with pretty short RCAs connecting the HT bypass input I can easily pick up terrible noise via any of my HiFi amps set to HT bypass (currently Arcam SA30, Rega Elicit-R, Naim Supernait 2 & Naim NAC-N 272) they all do the same, but if I just re-route the RCA cables a bit away from power leads it can very quickly solve the issue.

My Supernait I can also easily introduce ground loop issues if I connect a computer based Allo Roon endpoint, my Soncoz DAC or my Rega Aria phono stage, to solve that I have to ground the Supernait using a very simple earth power lead with just an earth cable connected to the 3 pin earth and the other end connected to the Supernait’s grounding point. This is tricky to do on the Arcam AV40 as it does not have a safe / easy turntable grounding point. You can get USB or RCA grounding cables, they need to be the sort that will ground the amp not just supply a grounding cable between 2 devices. Russ Andrews do a selection of technical grounding solutions but I've never used them and I've read they need to be used carefully as you could just as easily introduce issues.

As I say above, I'd go and try new XLR cables with chassis grounding opposite to what you have - I suspect you have chassis grounding connected and need un-connected - they do not need to be expensive cables. If you don't want to do this then have you tried ensuring the RCAs that go out of the AV40 to your Merdian are well away from any sources of interference, power leads are the prime candidate. I now dress my cables so that any HiFi amp type device goes into a completely separate and plain power sled (no filters) and power outlet to all my noisier devices such as SkyQ, UHD player, Apple TV & nVidia etc...

Failing all of that get your dealer round to look at the issue, if you paid good money they should have zero issues making sure you are 100% happy. Despite lock-down trades people have been 100% free to attend peoples houses if they so wish, if they or you did not want this to happen, I presume there should be no reason why they can't do this now. If they came round and they are worth their salt, they should easily be able to work out if you have ground loops, interference or faulty kit.
 

anteranz

Active Member
Hi guys, how does an external dac connect to the arcam? I have plugged the rca into the cd input but I would like to try the direct cd mode.

I have enabled the direct cd mode on the web and enabled the analog input, sound comes out but in the
arcam screen does not get stereo direct if not analogue .... Am I doing it right?
 

Thatsnotmynaim

Distinguished Member
Hi guys, how does an external dac connect to the arcam? I have plugged the rca into the cd input but I would like to try the direct cd mode.

I have enabled the direct cd mode on the web and enabled the analog input, sound comes out but in the
arcam screen does not get stereo direct if not analogue .... Am I doing it right?
‘CD direct’ is for digital PCM input, ‘Stereo Direct’ is for analogue inputs and allows you to use an external DAC using an Arcam analogue input with no additional processing done on the Arcam, akin to Denon ‘Pure direct’.
 

anteranz

Active Member
‘CD direct’ is for digital PCM input, ‘Stereo Direct’ is for analogue inputs and allows you to use an external DAC using an Arcam analogue input with no additional processing done on the Arcam, akin to Denon ‘Pure direct’.
Hello, thanks for your help ... I have always used hdmi and when I listen to two channels, I always get digital stereo on the screen, is this correct with an hdmi output? It should not only output "stereo" so direct cd I imagine it is when you connect a cd player to the arcam's cd inputs, right? I have replaced the cd reader with a dac connected to the pc via usb and from the rca of the dac to the cd in of the arcam am I doing it right?
 

Thatsnotmynaim

Distinguished Member
CD Direct is only for a PCM signal, not sure if that’s limited to only the digital inputs (Toslink / Coax etc) or if HDMI can also use it also. I just forced my nVidia Shield to output stereo PCM over HDMI and I could not select CD Direct.
I’d say DAC via analogue RCA into one of the ‘Analogue Audio’ inputs set to ‘Direct’ is probably the purest option for stereo music, especially if your external DAC is better than the Arcam’s internal DAC, usually will be.
 

rccarguy2

Well-known Member
Make sure you don't digitise analogue signals on arcams
 

anteranz

Active Member
CD Direct is only for a PCM signal, not sure if that’s limited to only the digital inputs (Toslink / Coax etc) or if HDMI can also use it also. I just forced my nVidia Shield to output stereo PCM over HDMI and I could not select CD Direct.
I’d say DAC via analogue RCA into one of the ‘Analogue Audio’ inputs set to ‘Direct’ is probably the purest option for stereo music, especially if your external DAC is better than the Arcam’s internal DAC, usually will be.
Hello friend, I imagine that the output of the dac is pcm, right? I must do something wrong because on the arcam screen it does not get information about the khz and 2.0 and where before it put digital stereo now it puts analogue stereo ... my dac in asr is half better than the dac of the arcam avr but the truth is that hard to find audible differences but I like to mess around!
 

Thatsnotmynaim

Distinguished Member
Hello friend, I imagine that the output of the dac is pcm, right? I must do something wrong because on the arcam screen it does not get information about the khz and 2.0 and where before it put digital stereo now it puts analogue stereo ... my dac in asr is half better than the dac of the arcam avr but the truth is that hard to find audible differences but I like to mess around!
A DAC output should be 2 x RCAs which are analogue, so no kHz. You want to leave it as analogue or you will negate the point of having the external DAC. With an analogue input in direct mode you will have zero processing so you do not have the sound being strangled by the internal ADC and DAC conversions. With analogue in direct mode you are just in 2.0 mode so no subwoofer and no Dirac.
 
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Thatsnotmynaim

Distinguished Member
Hello friend, I imagine that the output of the dac is pcm, right? I must do something wrong because on the arcam screen it does not get information about the khz and 2.0 and where before it put digital stereo now it puts analogue stereo ... my dac in asr is half better than the dac of the arcam avr but the truth is that hard to find audible differences but I like to mess around!
By the way a SINAD measurement in no way shape or form tells you how good something will sound. It’s a good indication of how well it’s made and may indicate it may sound good, but if device A has a higher SINAD score than device B that does not guarantee device A sounds better than device B. Some devices when designed and tuned can be designed to have either a better SINAD score or a better sound, i.e. something that measures perfectly may not necessarily sound the best. There’s no hard and fast rules, but better SINAD does not guarantee better sound.
 

Thatsnotmynaim

Distinguished Member
In order not to digitize the arcam, do you have to deactivate dirac? I think that if we use dirac it is already digitizing, right?
If you press the direct button on the remote, Dirac is automatically turned off I think.
 

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