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New aerial

Discussion in 'Satellite TV, Sky TV & FreeSat' started by Oddbodd, Jan 3, 2003.

  1. Oddbodd

    Oddbodd
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    Hi Guys, I am getting a local installer out early next week to quote for a new aerial etc. and I would appreciate a bit of advice. First of all could anyone recommend a good quality aerial that I should maybe ask for specifically? From this aerial I would like to feed approx. 3 t.v. sets, any advice on the best quality way to do that would also be appreciated. I would like to at least seem that I know what I'm talking about so I don't get just any old crap that's lying in the back of the van!:confused:

    Cheers John

    ps Merry xmas and happy new year to all..............
     
  2. Paul G

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    I don't think it's an easy answer, as there are just so many variables. Like how far away is your transmitter ect. You want an aerial for just analogue then you would need a masthead 3 way amp I guess. A good installer should get it all sorted as they would know your local area.
    Good luck. :confused:
     
  3. Fernsehman

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    I agree with Paul. The best expert *ought* to be your local installer since he will know which transmitter requires which aerial (it varies from region to region). If you want to "mug up" on this sort of stuff without getting into complicated maths or technical stuff you could try this site in the "satellite" section for the book called "Piping TV Around the House". As I recall it's not free - maybe about £7 to download - but good value if you want a "dummy's guide" that will let you talk as if you know it all! ;)

    Fman
     
  4. super7

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    Oddbodd

    Don't have any specific manufacturers to suggest. As the others have said, your installer should choose the best aerial for the job.

    The important thing about aerials is preserving the signal it receives, avoiding interference / signal loss. I would insist on satellite grade coaxial cable - it is hardly any more expensive, but is much better shielded. Also, if you only feed one TV, you might want to feed the cable straight through the wall and terminate with a coax connector, rather than having an aerial socket on the wall - again, less signal loss. Alternatively, you can buy 'shielded' wall sockets. If you go this route, make up your own aerial lead with satellite grade coax and good quality metal cased coax connectors.

    Maxview has a good site (and make pretty good aerials, both for installers and DIYers - check out the download page in the 'support' drop-down for their Broadcast Reception and Telecoms Guide - full of good stuff. (I have no links with them!)

    Hope this helps

    Super7
     
  5. Oddbodd

    Oddbodd
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    Thank you very much guys, just what I wanted..............
    :) Oddbodd
     
  6. AMc

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    And be wary of being ripped off!
    I got a quote for an aerial and 2 sockets from a reputable (looking) company from yellow pages that topped £200. They mucked me about with appointments and then didn't turn up.
    When the quote mentioned "two RGB enabled digital ready sockets" I smelt a rat and told them to (cough) "go away".
    I bought all the stuff they were suggesting for less than £50 from B&Q including 100m of sheilded sat cable and did it myself.
    The info on the Maxview site was very helpful.
     
  7. Gordon A

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  8. installer09

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    I use Frarcaro , televes and antiference aerials , these are all good , as super 7 states satellite cable is better than co-ax , but there are different grades of satellite cable , a cheap one with silver foil for screening and a much better one with copper screnning ,ask for ctu 100 or similar.
     
  9. jim.rae

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    For me a 12 element aerial on the chimney was just fine.

    It feeds an Antiference distributor amp (from Argos at around £20 I think) to feed two DTT receivers and an analogue signal to a VCR.

    Total cost of installation £50, plus amplifier from a local aerial contractor...

    Always offer a tea or coffee before they go on the roof - it seems to help the process no end!
     
  10. Paul G

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    Anything less than an 18 element aerial and the reception is poor in my neck of the woods. And that's even with a booster. I live 40- 50 miles from the nearest (Dover) transmitter though.
     
  11. WBC

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    I'm looking for a new aerial as well.

    Is it fair to say the more elements the better. For the sake of about £40 would it just be easier to go and get an 18 element aerial????

    Thanks
    Stace :D
     
  12. Fernsehman

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    Usually, increasing the directivity is a good thing as it cuts down the possibility of interference. But bear in mind that the aerial will also require more accurate alignment and, if it subsequently gets blown about by the wind, you could end up with picture drop-out which an aerial with less elements wouldn't give!

    AFAIR you need a signal at the receiver which is at least 25dB above the noise floor. This info. isn't much help unless you understand it AND have the equipment to measure it! But the point is that too much signal is no advantage. 35dB would be very nice but anything above that is wasted and could even cause problems - bearing in mind that the analogue signals will inevitably be stronger than the digital and *might* be so strong that they "swamp' the Freeview tuner.

    Then you have the problem that some digital multiplexes are stronger than others. So the aerial ideally needs to be design to have a stronger gain at the frequencies used by the weak "muxes". Sometimes a wideband aerial is appropriate but sometimes a specific "band" aerial is better.

    Basically, it's a good idea to do some research - look at which muxes are on which UHF channels on your local transmitter and look at their relative signal strengths. That "Piping TV.." book I mentioned previously gives a simplified explanation of UHF channels, interference etc. although it doesn't deal specifically with Freeview. It's more satellite oriented.

    Fman
     
  13. WBC

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    What other problems (if any) would I encounter if I put the aerial in the roof space???

    That would certainly stop any problems with wind etc.

    Whats the best way to find out which transmitter I point to???

    Thanks for a quick response.
    Stace :D
     
  14. stormchaser

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    hi
    the best advice is to contact the bbc who offer a free advice service .they will suggest the most suitable type of aerial and give you the exact compass orientation for setting it up :D :D
    ps
    after I set mine up,I get a better picture than all my neighbours and they all are using digital lol:D
     
  15. WBC

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    When you say contact the BBC do you mean by phone, I tried to find the info on the web but didn't get anywhere.

    Thanks
    Stace :D
     
  16. stormchaser

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  17. Fernsehman

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  18. esrtfc

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    I seem to be suffering from the same problem (not trusting the installer) I have had experience of bad installation (ie using coax shells as washers to attach aerial to facia board, and braking ridge tiles) and would not trust any one but myself. I have had real trouble trying to locate a retailer who sells quality aerials. Do any of you know where to get them from or do you order mail order from the professional suppliers?
     
  19. Chris Muriel

    Chris Muriel
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    I either order from CPC (officially trade only though you can go to their Trade Counter in Preston with cash) or else to a local trade place that does both satellite & TV stuff- lots of aerials, LNBs, actuators , cable etc.
    If you tell us where you are based, someone may know a suitable local supplier.

    Chris Muriel, Manchester.
     
  20. Fernsehman

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    A search for "BBC Engineering" (with the inverted commas) on the bbc.co.uk web site produced 38 results. Try this one first:

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/reception/factsheets/index.shtml

    If those fact sheets don't help, type in the magic words and do the search yourself to get the 37 other web pages. :)

    Fman
     
  21. esrtfc

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    thanks chris, I live in north bristol, so bristol,bath etc would be no problem,
     
  22. KevinELane

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    Hi

    Yes Stormchaser, is that a telephone call to the BBC for the free service? I am looking to receive digital broadcasts, and as with the above posts, am nervous about not knowing what I need exactly.

    On the subject of quotes, I was quoted £160 for an aerial, £145 for a distribution box (for four points in total) £145 for a freeview box and £85 per socket. :eek:

    At prices such as these, DIY starts to become extremely appealing. £50 from B&Q? I'll have some of that..Its just knowing the correct aerial, cabling and termination points..:rolleyes:

    Might now look at DIY, if I can get advice on the type of digital aerial for my region...over to you Stormchaser :D

    In any event, I am looking to have a digital aerial, the Nolia 221T receiver which seems to be recommended, one socket, and a distribution box to future proof the installation.

    Cheers

    Kevin
     
  23. KevinELane

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    Ahh bugger - didn't see page 2 :eek:

    Kevin
     
  24. Fernsehman

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    I think EUROSAT has a place in/near Bristol. Just make up a company letter head and wander in. Provided that you sound as if you know what you are asking for, they'll sell you whatever you need. Yes, found it, I think: (01179) 412666. Is that a Bristol code?

    Don't expect a trade warehouse like this to advise you. If you wander in and ask "what aerial do I need for...." you'll be outside before you know it.

    If you wander in and curse a bit and say "darn customer wants a group CD aerial. I told him it's group B round here but he won't listen" they'll hopefully accept you as trade. They might even correct you and tell you you need a group A aerial!

    But *plan* your wiring layout first. Decide on what cable you need (satellite cable for everything actually), clips, wall points, connectors, drill, cable tidies, screws, wall plugs etc.

    You'll see some of this stuff pictured on the satcure site.

    There's also a book you can buy and download immediately called Piping TV Around the House which won't tell you which aerial you need but contains some good tips about wiring up and tuning in. If you follow the guidance in that you'll at least understand *why* you need a particular type of aerial and probably be able to figure out which type.

    It suggests that you tune your TV through every UHF channel position from 21 to 69 and note down what programme you see, how bad the picture is and whether or not you want to receive it. If you decide from this list that you only want channels 21 to 45 (say) then it suggests you fit a filter to get rid of 46 to 69. This leaves that part of the band free for your VCR, DVD, Digibox etc. to send their RF signals round the house. It also means that your aerial only needs to pick up channels 21 to 45 so you don't need a "wideband" aerial.

    Or, your list may tell you the opposite (you do need a wideband aerial).

    Whatever you discover, you'll understand better what you are trying to achieve and probably save a lot of time, money and hassle.

    Fman
     

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