Networking setup for new build

Discussion in 'Networking & NAS' started by Saul Goodman, Dec 11, 2016.

  1. Saul Goodman

    Saul Goodman
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    Can anyone recommend some reasonably priced equipment for networking our newbuild

    I've got about 20 Cat6 and Coax pre-wired to various rooms.

    I believe I should be looking for something like a 9U rack, patch panel and Gigabit switch?

    I also have a Synology DS215j Nas system.

    Thanks :)
     
  2. Kristian

    Kristian
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    You'll need to expand on the 'pre-wired' cable bit because you're asking about a patch panel... Are the cables installed already? If you've not already done so, where are you planning on terminating all your cables? Why do you think you need a cab, they're not always necessary at home? The number of live devices plus a few spares will determine what size switch you need (8, 12, 16, 24 ports for example).
     
  3. Saul Goodman

    Saul Goodman
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    All cables have been installed already by my electrician during the first fix. All bedrooms, sun room, cinema room, living room, study have 2 Cat6 cables and coax(most have them on each side of the room too). All wired from a walking cupboard in the study.

    I did at first look for a wall mounted patch panel but the only one I found was more expensive than buying a small cabinet. Initially cat6 will only be using for wired internet in each room but I added extras in case I want to send video in future.
     
  4. rs6mra

    rs6mra
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    It appears that from what you have mentioned that you will only need housing for the patch panel & switch; correct? So why the 9u rack? A 24 port patch panel & switch would be your best solution.
    You mentioned coax cables which I am guessing would be terminated at an amplifier which you would then have to obtain a tray for if you were using a rack and it may not be the best solution.
    In my case I have a 24 port panel & switch, bought a 4/6U rack and it was taking up for too much space in the bottom of a built-in wardrobe. So I built a 2U rack out of timber and my NAS seats ontop of it.
    You will need to make sure that your panel is cat6
     
  5. Saul Goodman

    Saul Goodman
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    Sorry I meant to type 6u. Yeh, I'm not sure how/where to house the coax amplifier.
     
  6. Kristian

    Kristian
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    As RS6 says above, a 24 way patch panel (£20-£30) will be fine (I'm guessing around 16 cables) and then a 12 or 24 port switch depending on how many live devices you have. No need for a cabinet if you can rig up some kind mount for the PP and switch, which should be quite easy.

    For basic switches you could look at Netgear, TPLink and HP.
     
  7. ChuckMountain

    ChuckMountain
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    Also hope the sparky had used proper cat6 and not cca
     
  8. mickevh

    mickevh
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    Hope the spark and others haven't "plastered them into the walls." If so, they've probably not "cat6" any more :devil: (Though will probably work OK for Gbit ethernet unless they've tied knots in them.)
     
  9. Saul Goodman

    Saul Goodman
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    Thanks for the advice guys. No, my sparky covered all cables with protective casing before any plastering work.
     
  10. ChuckMountain

    ChuckMountain
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    And were they definitely not CCA ??
     
  11. Saul Goodman

    Saul Goodman
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    Definitely not, still got loads left on a reel
     
  12. Saul Goodman

    Saul Goodman
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    Going back to the plastering, my brother inlaw has done similar and his sparky didn't install casing around the cables apart from where he was having a scratch finish. Are his cables likely to be damaged now?
     
  13. mickevh

    mickevh
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    They may or may not be "damaged," but any nicks and such like in the sheathing or crushing of the cable could eat in to the performance which may mean they fail cat6 performance criteria.

    The installations requirements to achieve cat6 and better are much more stringent than lower "cats." There is much more to achieving the higher "cats" of install than simply buying the appropriated cable (though of course that's a factor,) faceplates, patch panels, etc. The higher cats require a greater level of care and diligence in materials, containment and installation practice. If you want to scare yourself silly, have a read of the following... Installation Pitfalls in Cat6 Cabling | Automated Home.

    We (and at least "I") used to "get away" with a lot when installing cat5 and cat5e that we couldn't do with cat6 and higher. Professionally (I'm a Network Manager) I'd never attempt a cat6 or better install myself and would engage a professional to do it (and present me with the test certificates and guarrantees.)

    Strictly speaking most DIY installs are not "cat" anything as most DIY'ers don't test with the rather expensive test gear needed to certify the install. But that doesn't mean they don't "work" for lower bandwidth applications such as ethernet. However, something with higher bandwidth requirements - I'm speculating what, but maybe HDMI and for sure 10GBit ethernet may trip up.

    It always invites the question, "if one is not going to install and test to cat6, why bother and instead use cat5e." But the counter argument is that since the price difference between cat5e and cat6 is so low these days, you "may as well" deploy cat6 even if you're not planning to properly test and certify it and (essentially) "hope for the best."
     
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    Last edited: Dec 16, 2016
  14. robbo100

    robbo100
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    In terms of "equipment", I have recently replaced my router with a thin client running IPFire (which I have started a new thread about).

    I don't have any links with the IPFire project, but am quite impressed. Since your setup seems quite "serious", I thought I would mention that as an option.
     
  15. Saul Goodman

    Saul Goodman
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    Chaps , do I really need a patch panel?

    What's the advantage using one rather than all cat6 cables going straight in to a switch?
     
  16. Kristian

    Kristian
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    Solid cored cable is supposed to terminate onto IDCs which means patch panel or modules. Plugs are possible but a pain. Solid core can break eventually due to fatigue, it's not supposed to be moved much after installation. PP keeps things neat too, then just use bought patch leads for connecting devices.
     

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