Networking a house

plainmad

Active Member
I currently live at home still (can't afford to move out :() and whilst it have some benefits it can be a real pain when it comes to having a perfect home cinema and all the extra kit.

Luckily the old man seems to have jumped on the idea of a NAS and having HTPc's around the house. Now this has really pleased me but it means we need to get our network up to scratch. Now my initial thought were to go for the TP link 500 homeplugs due to the good review they get but they wont be up to streaming HD MKV round the house espically if more than one is being streamed at the time.

So this means we have to install CAT which isn't something i'm comfortable doing. Now I know you can get a local sparky to do it no problem but the old man is worried how they would install it.
What he doesn't want is to do is to repaint the walls once the cable have been installed.

How do sparkies normally install extra cables in a house or is installing ethernet cable's really that easy that we could do it ourselves?

Thanks
 

HeadBanger

Well-known Member
It's very easy with the right tools and kit. Check out Kenable for good prices. Go for Cat 6 cable and work out where you want them and how many you need. It's easy and very cheap to do.
 

maf1970

Well-known Member
How easy it is depends on the age of your house and how it was built. e.g. older houses tend to have gaps behind walls and foundations you can get into. Then you can just follow existing wiring to get to the rooms.

Newer houses tend to be a bit more complex as they are made using materials that are pre-fab.
 

plainmad

Active Member
The building is a 16 year old chalet bungalow.

Whilst i've got no problems in terminating the cable and ethernet plates, the problem is getting the cables around the house.
 

next010

Distinguished Member
Compressed HD x264/mkv with homeplugs should be okay, you might even get multiple streams reliably with one of the fastest performing homplugs like Zyxels PLA4205 kit (benchmarks) and by using a UPnP/DLNA media server like Serviio for instance.

TP-Link are not a good choice, they have issues with UPnP/DLNA though they have released some firmware updates to resolve it.

Also do you really need HTPC's you can get dirt cheap media players that will handle everything these days, you might not have the fancy UI but it would be low cost and reliable.
 

plainmad

Active Member
The streams are going to be uncrompressed 1080p HD audio blu ray back ups so i dont think home plugs will be able to handle it.
 

next010

Distinguished Member
If conditions are good and you use the DLNA server you could get possibly get away with one uncompressed BD stream playing back. Any basic media player box like WDTV Live in the other rooms will handle the media (I assume they all don't have HD audio sound systems in each room) and keep the HTPC if you really want in the main TV room.

Another option is consider Plex on the HTPC and Plex client for the Raspberry Pi (rasplex) or the Plex client for the Sony GoogleTV. Plex media server runs on the HTPC and doubles as the server for the other clients.

But if your dead set on multiple streams playing back then yeah your going to need ethernet and a fast enough NAS or PC to stream such content to multiple clients.
 

maf1970

Well-known Member
Seeing as it is a bugalow you could utilise the loft space for distributing the cabling and then run it down using trunking on the wall (I know not pretty but I'm taking into account your post info). Minimal post install work.

If you can get into the foundations via a hatch you could run the cable underneath then up into each room. This would have very minimal trunking and be pretty much unnoticeable.
 

mickevh

Distinguished Member
The streams are going to be uncrompressed 1080p HD audio blu ray back ups so i dont think home plugs will be able to handle it.

Are you sure you mean "uncompressed"..? Even Blu-Ray is "compressed" - if not the bandwidth requirements would be huge. (Have a look at the bit rate numbers for HDMI which is truely uncomressed A/V and contrast that with Blu-Ray and networking bit rates.)

Most "domestic" A/V scenarios transfer the compressed data across the "network" in it's various guises and leave the playback devices to do the de-compression and rendering. The smaller the data streams yo need to move around, the easier it is for the network infrastructure to cope.
 

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