Network Problem

eireann10

Well-known Member
Hi

Wrong place for this i know but in a bit of a hurry to fix it.

I have 5 PC's on a network, which seemed to be connecting ok, one of them (win7) is not connecting to any of the others now. When i checked them all ive noticed some of them are on either NETWORK, NETWORK 2 or NETWORK 3.

Why is there 3 different Network and how do i get them all on the one network. 4 WIN10 & 1 WIN7 machines.
 
Set you workgroup (I assume that is what you are referring to...) to the same name to make it easier....I am also assuming here that you are actually connected to the same physical network infrastructure and don't have any domain controllers.
 

spoonuk

Active Member
Are you using a dummy switch to get all machines connected to the network? Network 2 or 3 doesn't really matter as it is just a numbering sequence used by the OS. Are you statically setting IP addressing or using a DHCP server?
 

nheather

Distinguished Member
Network 1, 2, 3 etc. Is nothing to do with the actual network. It is just the profiles associated with the times that a network adaptor has been set up on a network.

Say you have set up a computer successfully the first time - the adapter will most likely be called Network 1. Say your motherboard developed a fault and was replaced with an identical model, chances are that one would be called Network 2. If you fitted a second NIC that would probably be called Network 3.

They make sense because they will all be associated with different MAC addresses. But I have seen the same NIC change name (Network x) through OS updates, reinstalling an OS, or resolving network problems (deleting and recreating a network connection).

So as others have said, you can ignore that, nothing to do with network itself, just a relatively arbitary 'name' given to the adapter.

WORKGROUP is most likely the problem. Make sure each computer is on the same WORKGROUP. If you right click > properties on the computer icon on the desktop (if you have one) or on the entry in File Explorer you should see the WORKGROUP and be able to change it if need be.

Cheers,

Nigel
 
Network 1, 2, 3 etc. Is nothing to do with the actual network. It is just the profiles associated with the times that a network adaptor has been set up on a network.

Say you have set up a computer successfully the first time - the adapter will most likely be called Network 1. Say your motherboard developed a fault and was replaced with an identical model, chances are that one would be called Network 2. If you fitted a second NIC that would probably be called Network 3.

They make sense because they will all be associated with different MAC addresses. But I have seen the same NIC change name (Network x) through OS updates, reinstalling an OS, or resolving network problems (deleting and recreating a network connection).

So as others have said, you can ignore that, nothing to do with network itself, just a relatively arbitary 'name' given to the adapter.

WORKGROUP is most likely the problem. Make sure each computer is on the same WORKGROUP. If you right click > properties on the computer icon on the desktop (if you have one) or on the entry in File Explorer you should see the WORKGROUP and be able to change it if need be.

Cheers,

Nigel
LOL as already posted ;)
 

eireann10

Well-known Member
Thanks folks, the Networks where throwing me off a bit, but now i understand it a bit more, i had never noticed before that one of them was on a different workgroup, changed it and all sorted for now i hope.
 
Starting with Win 7, you can also set the computers on a Homegroup. It's the same as a Workgroup but automatically sets up sharing on the common libraries like Documents, Music, and Video without the need to manually configure them.
 

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