Network cable

Discussion in 'Networking & NAS' started by sltl, Sep 8, 2012.

  1. sltl

    sltl
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    Hi guys , i know there has been posts on this in the past but i was hoping for more up to date prices and advice. Basically redoing the flooring in my house and wanted to pass network cable to all areas of the house. After doing research i think i would like to future proof it, so thinking to put CAT6 and also seems for wiring i should buy solid core cable. Anyone have advice on where i can buy good quality cable at a non extortionate price, i would prefer if people had personal experience with the cable ofc and i will preferably buy a reel.
    Thanks in advance
     
  2. andy1249

    andy1249
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  3. sltl

    sltl
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    any chance of getting a shorter reel...will definately not need that much. Thanks for the suggestion though, although i had thought the cable would be slightly cheaper than this.
     
  4. andy1249

    andy1249
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    Same site ,

    Black Box - Cables, Bulk Cable, CAT6

    Comes in 76 meters , 150 meters , and 300 meters , starts at around 33 ex vat , so approx 40.

    If you want to go cheaper go CAT5E , look under bulk cable on the same site.

    Most certified safe cable is around this price , you can get cheaper on Ebay , usually fakes with flammable coatings though , and a major fire hazard.
    Certainly not worth the risk for the few pounds saved.

    Remember , if your running this stuff all over your house you need to make sure is safety certified , otherwise you've just provided a flammable path to every room in the house.

    I work for a Major US Corp with a really impressive safety record , and they use this stuff , so highly recommended.
     
    Last edited: Sep 8, 2012
  5. sltl

    sltl
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    i see, but usually dont you use solid core for walls, long distances etc. and stranded mostly for patch cables
     
  6. mickevh

    mickevh
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    Yes. Solid is usually a bit cheaper than patch and the punch blocks are designed to accept solid. Plugs are desiged to accept patch. You can use patch for cable runs, it's just that you need "special" punch block to terminate them on.

    A lot of sites, particularly those aimed at the USA, talk about "plenum" rated cable which IIRC is designed for use above ceiling tiles and below suspended floors and as such has properties that are more favourable in fires.
     
  7. diego_maradona

    diego_maradona
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    Sorry to jump in to the thread, but I have a similar question re. cat6 cable. I'm fairly IT savvy but don't know a huge deal when it comes to network cables.

    I have a run of around 20m or so from which I need to pass through some cat 6 cables. Now like the OP suggested I have heard that solid is better for walls etc, but then have also received conflicting advice that stranded is better because it won't break so easily. I'm royally confused now reading about the subject, getting confused when hearing the terms patch cables, UTP, STP, Stranded, Solid etc...

    My basic requirement is that I have a router positioned near a tv and will be connecting a cat6 cable to a RJ45 socket, chasing a channel up the wall to carry my cables through the ceiling and dropping it through into the next room.

    Any help would be massively appreciated!
     
  8. mickevh

    mickevh
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    Solid is for permanently installed cable runs where the cable isn't likely to move much, if at all. The "punch down" blocks in the back of patch panels and room sockets is designed to accept solid core cables.

    Stranded AKA "patch" cable is used where cables need more (mechanical) fexibility or where cables move a lot more such as desk drops, equipment hookup etc. 8p8c (AKA RJ45) plugs are designed to accept stranded cable.

    "Made" patch-cords are almost always stranded and supplied with an 8p8c (plug) either end.

    It's the same as the domestic mains - the "twin and earth" plastered into the fabric of the building is solid core, (cheaper, never sees the light of day again after installation) whereas the applicance leads from the sockets the kettles, toasters, etc. are stranded to resist breaking due to metal fatigue.

    UTP = Unshileded Twisted Pair - what the cable is (it's often erroneously called "ethernet" cable, but you can use it for other things too.)

    STP = Shielded Twisted Pair - same as UTP with an extra braided or foil earthing conductor surrounding everything (like aerial or satellite cables.) To work properly the shield needs to be grounded (earthed.) It's only really for the uber paranoid as the "point" of using UTP is to not have to bother with all the hassle of grounding things. At work I run hundreds of UTP cabled through electrically noisey environments such as plant rooms and thus far have never had a problem that needed to be "solved" by using STP.

    My favourite site about UTP:

    http://www.ertyu.org/steven_nikkel/ethernetcables.html
     
    Last edited: Sep 9, 2012
  9. diego_maradona

    diego_maradona
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    Thank you very much Mickevh. That's a great help. Would you recommend any particular brand? So I am now looking at getting solid UTP cable for the more permanent in wall, in ceiling cable which is terminated at room sockets. Probably will only need around 50m or so in total.
    Is there anywhere in particular you would recommend buying from?
     
  10. mickevh

    mickevh
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    No. Theoretically, if it says it's "catX" then it should be catX and the purpose of the "cat" kitemark is to assert a quality standard. For example, anything called cat5e should be good for 10/100/1000 ethernet to at least 100m.

    You just have to watch out for people passing off other things as catX. For example, we saw a examples recently of someone selling "cat6e" (no such thing) and CCA (copper clad aluminium) as catX which is surprising since I believe the "cat" standards require the cables to be pure copper.

    However, I wouldn't decent from using Black Box as recommended above. They've been supplying gizmo's and electronics for at least 20 years that I know of and I doubt they'd have stayed in business that long if they sold junk. They've also been really helpfull to me in the past - they once custom made me some cables that I needed.

    I could mention several brands I've used at work, but I won't because they were "what turned up" when I've asked my wonderful procurement lady to order me some boxes/reels of UTP rather than brands I went shopping for.
     
  11. cerb

    cerb
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    Maplin do a perfectly good Cat5E UTP, £1 per metre, or £80 for 305 metres; I've used it several times, works fine.

    There's not much point putting in Cat6; it offers a better spec than 5E, but is not necessary for 10/100/1000 ethernet; next level up is Cat6A, which is rated for 10gig ethernet....

    Make sure you are careful when you knock down the cables onto the RJ45 sockets; to meet Cat5E needs both compliant components and also for the terminations to be made correctly, including retaining the twist of the pairs close to the termination block.
     

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