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Need to buy replacement power adaptor for Xmas tree lights

Foebane72

Prominent Member
A couple of years ago I bought a nice set of LED Christmas tree lights and for the first Christmas all seemed fine. Then, at the end of the second Christmas I noticed that the socket for the lights (which is in the adaptor itself and the lights plug into them) became damaged. Basically, the plug for the lights is female and the male socket in the adaptor is broken so that the pin is loose, so it's a bad contact.

Putting aside how this could've happened - I didn't jolt the lead or anything - I am wondering how easy it is to replace the adaptor, as there's nothing wrong with the lights themselves.

The adaptor is marked:

Safety Isolating Transformer
PLU 264668
Model Number: YMAA-2400200
PRI: 220-240V AC 50Hz
SEC: 24V AC-200mA, 4.8VA
IP:20

Having a look on Amazon, there seems to be plenty of such adaptors, but the "SEC:" values don't always match the ones I have. A lot of them say 24V, so is that enough? What is the risk if the mA figure is much different? Or the VA?

I was thinking of looking at Argos or even Clas Ohlson in town today and see if they have anything, but what do you suggest?
 

outoftheknow

Moderator
A couple of years ago I bought a nice set of LED Christmas tree lights and for the first Christmas all seemed fine. Then, at the end of the second Christmas I noticed that the socket for the lights (which is in the adaptor itself and the lights plug into them) became damaged. Basically, the plug for the lights is female and the male socket in the adaptor is broken so that the pin is loose, so it's a bad contact.

Putting aside how this could've happened - I didn't jolt the lead or anything - I am wondering how easy it is to replace the adaptor, as there's nothing wrong with the lights themselves.

The adaptor is marked:

Safety Isolating Transformer
PLU 264668
Model Number: YMAA-2400200
PRI: 220-240V AC 50Hz
SEC: 24V AC-200mA, 4.8VA
IP:20

Having a look on Amazon, there seems to be plenty of such adaptors, but the "SEC:" values don't always match the ones I have. A lot of them say 24V, so is that enough? What is the risk if the mA figure is much different? Or the VA?

I was thinking of looking at Argos or even Clas Ohlson in town today and see if they have anything, but what do you suggest?
For the secondary voltage you need either the mA or the VA. 24V by itself isn't enough to ensure the adapter can handle the marked currents. 24 multiplied by 200mA (0.2A) gives you 4.8VA so either of these figures will be enough. Nothing smaller.
 

nheather

Distinguished Member
SEC means secondary, referring to the secondary winding of the transformer. Put simply it just means the output voltage of the teansformer.

You really need one with the same output voltage - 24V in this case.

VA is volt amps, just another way of saying watts. If you look at the voltage (24V) and the current (200mA or 0.2A) and multipky them together you get 4.8. What you need here is at least 200mA (0.2A) - if the replacement has a higher value that is okay.

What is odd is that it suggests that the output is not rectified - that means it is still alternating current (AC) rather than being converted to direct current (DC). That is unusual but going by the label alone you are looking for an adaptor with an AC output which is quite unusual.

Could you possibly add a photo as I'm struggling to understand what is broken.

Do the LEDs flash (or other functions) - if so where is the control for that?

Cheers,

Nigel
 

outoftheknow

Moderator
Does it look anything like these?

http://www.amazon.co.uk/24v-300ma-Power-Supply-output/dp/B0098WD00S

Edit - not that it will make any difference in practical terms in this application just be aware that in DC Volts times Amperes is indeed power in Watts. In AC though Volts times Amperes is VA. For power in Watts you need to multiply by the power factor.:smashin:
 
Last edited:

Foebane72

Prominent Member
I've just ordered the above item, and a DC plug adapter as well, as I think it needs one. I'll let you know how I get on. Thanks!
 

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