Need help to (properly) setup my Sony str-dh590 to fronts and sub

Hi,

I' dont know if this is the right place to write this type of question, if not, please direct me to the proper subforum. Currently running a 2.1 setup for music.

My current specs:
  • AV/Reciever: Sony STR-D590 (I picked this cause of budget, and used money on speakers instead)
  • Fronts: Klipsch RP-160M - got a 40% deal on these, new.
    • Cables: Supra Classic 2.5 2x2.5mm
    • Speaker stands: B-Tech BT606 Atlas 60cm
  • Subwoofer: SVS SB-1000 PRO
    • Cables: Van Den Hul mini-sub 3m, connected from LFE on subwoofer to one of the subwoofer outputs on the AV/Reciever.

I calibrated the speakers with the auto-calibration settings on the AV/Reciever. The distances to main listening position seem correct. Then I set the speakers to small, 60hz crossover, and 0 db level. This is something that was recommended on a forum I read. But what does this crossover mean? Subwoofer settings on the AV/Reciever is set to +10 db level. Amp speaker setup set to 2.1.

The frequency response of the fronts are 45hz-25khz (+/-3db)
The frequency response of the subwoofer is 20 to 270 Hz (-3 dB)

On my SVS app is usually use -15db on volume. I have a setting called "low pass filter" set on "off (LFE mode active). Should I use this? Phase 0 degrees.

Should I fill my speaker stands with 2/3 parts of fine grained sand?

Lot's of text, sorry about that. I would appreciate any response.

Also: What would you consider this, a "low-end" sound system?
 
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gibbsy

Moderator
Welcome to the Forum.

By setting the crossover to 60hz it means that all the low frequencies below that number will be redirected to the sub. You will get a better bass response in that way as stereo speakers cannot go down anywhere near to where a sub can reach.

LPF should be left at 120hz which should be the default setting. The post calibration reading of 10dB suggests you have sub's volume set too low, increase it slightly and re-run the calibration, ideally you are looking to get as close to 0dB as possible but a -5dB would be fine. AV amps work in the range of -12dB to +12dB.

As for filling the stands then it is recommended. No need to buy expensive filler, go to a hardware shop and buy some children's play sand. You could also go to an aquarists shop and buy some fine aquarium gravel to fill them up.

Low end? For music yes. AV amps cannot compete with a stereo amp costing the same amount of money even when some room correction is involved. Sony is better than some other makes for music and if you are happy with how it sounds then it's a good investment for you but it's not something that I would personally recommend.
 
Welcome to the Forum.

By setting the crossover to 60hz it means that all the low frequencies below that number will be redirected to the sub. You will get a better bass response in that way as stereo speakers cannot go down anywhere near to where a sub can reach.

LPF should be left at 120hz which should be the default setting. The post calibration reading of 10dB suggests you have sub's volume set too low, increase it slightly and re-run the calibration, ideally you are looking to get as close to 0dB as possible but a -5dB would be fine. AV amps work in the range of -12dB to +12dB.

As for filling the stands then it is recommended. No need to buy expensive filler, go to a hardware shop and buy some children's play sand. You could also go to an aquarists shop and buy some fine aquarium gravel to fill them up.

Low end? For music yes. AV amps cannot compete with a stereo amp costing the same amount of money even when some room correction is involved. Sony is better than some other makes for music and if you are happy with how it sounds then it's a good investment for you but it's not something that I would personally recommend.

Thank you for a thoroughly answer.

Post calibration has showed some irregularities on the subwoofer distance (therefor the db level). Maybe because I had a table between the sensor and sub.
I'm not sure how my sub should be set at default before calibration? I can choose between -60db to 0db in volume. LWP is set off right now. Should I activate LWP and set it to 120hz after calibration?
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
Many think that sub distances are incorrect because the result they get differs to what you'd measure with a tape measure. The fact of the matter is that the distance settings are not actually strictly determined by physical distances and a calculated relative to the time it takes the AV receiver to detect the test tone.

Distance​

Seriously, how important can this be? You let auto-calibration take care of this for you, or if you’re feeling particularly hands on, you might whip out the tape measure, right? A word of wisdom: don’t underestimate the power of the distance setting in your A/V receiver. Obviously the primary job of the distance setting is setting a delay relative to your other speakers. Note, the distance reported by your receiver’s auto-calibration will be inclusive of any delay caused by signal processing happening inside the subwoofer (EQ, low pass filtering, etc.), which can add several feet to the distance per your tape measure. Above and beyond this, the distance adjustment functions as a phase control of sorts. Adding or subtracting a couple feet from the distance of your subwoofer is a viable way of getting rid of an ugly peak or dip around the crossover point. Again, to make the most out of this tool, one does need the ability to take measurements. Still, who would have ever thought such an innocuous setting could have that kind of power?



The fact that the distance setting you get post calibration doesn't match what you get if physically measuring that distance isn't necessarily to say that the results attained by the AV receiver's own auto calibration are incorrect.





The following is how the sub itself should be configured prior to calibration:

  • Connect the AV receiver's sub pre out to the low level RCA input labelled LFE or MONO on the sub
  • Set the subs own volume setting to about what would equate to 10 o'clock and no more than midway
  • Set the sub's phase option to 0°
  • Set the frequency filter on the sub to its highest setting or an LFE option if it has one


It is also recommended that you set the power to be always on as opposed to using any AUTO power option.

Once the calibration is complete, set all speakers as being SMALL onboard the AV receiver and set the associated crossover settings on the AV receiver no lower than 80Hz. If the AV receiver has already set the crossovers higher than this then do not set them below the roll off that the AV receiver measured.
 
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Many think that sub distances are incorrect because the result thry get differs to what you'd measure with a tape measure. The fact of the matter is that the distance settings are not actually strictly determined by physical distances and a calculated relative to the time it takes the AV receiver to detect the test tone.





The fact that the distance setting you get post calibration doesn't match what you get if physically measuring that distance isn't necessarily to say that the results attained by the AV receiver's own auto calibration are incorrect.





The following is how the sub itself should be configured prior to calibration:

  • Connect the AV receiver's sub pre out to the low level RCA input labelled LFE or MONO on the sub
  • Set the subs own volume setting to about what would equate to 10 o'clock and no more than midway
  • Set the sub's phase option to 0°
  • Set the frequency filter on the sub to its highest setting or an LFE option if it has one


It is also recommended that you set the power to be always on as opposed to using any AUTO power option.

Once the calibration is complete, set all speakers as being SMALL onboard the AV receiver and set the associated crossover settings on the AV receiver no lower than 80Hz. If the AV receiver has already set the crossovers higher than this then do not set them below the roll off that the AV receiver measured.

Thank you for your guide. I set my SVS 1000 pro to about 30% volume, calibrated the AV/Reciever with the calibration cable to listening spot, set front speakers to small, set low pass filter on subwoofer to 60hz and crossover for the fronts at 60hz. I tested both 60hz and 80hz crossover on the speakers. Didn't hear much difference, but I'm afraid I'll be missing some frequencies by setting it to 80hz. Felt more "depth" in the sound at 60hz, more dynamic with the subwoofer.

It sounds pretty good now!
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
Thank you for your guide. I set my SVS 1000 pro to about 30% volume, calibrated the AV/Reciever with the calibration cable to listening spot, set front speakers to small, set low pass filter on subwoofer to 60hz and crossover for the fronts at 60hz. I tested both 60hz and 80hz crossover on the speakers. Didn't hear much difference, but I'm afraid I'll be missing some frequencies by setting it to 80hz. Felt more "depth" in the sound at 60hz, more dynamic with the subwoofer.

It sounds pretty good now!



The LPF of LFE filter on an AV receiver should always be left set to its 120Hz setting. This filter is not a crossover and is a filter that only applies to the discrete LFE channel if and when present. You are advised to leave it set to 120Hz because this is the ceiling used the LFE channel when mixing Dolby encoded soundtracks. Set the LFE filter below this and you are discarding parts of the LFE channel and effecting the roll off as desired by whoever mixed said soundtrack.


You don't miss any frequencies if setting a crossover at 80Hz. A crossover determines at which point to redirect frequencies away from a passive speaker designated small out to the sub for the sub to portray.
 
The LPF of LFE filter on an AV receiver should always be left set to its 120Hz setting. This filter is not a crossover and is a filter that only applies to the discrete LFE channel if and when present. You are advised to leave it set to 120Hz because this is the ceiling used the LFE channel when mixing Dolby encoded soundtracks. Set the LFE filter below this and you are discarding parts of the LFE channel and effecting the roll off as desired by whoever mixed said soundtrack.


You don't miss any frequencies if setting a crossover at 80Hz. A crossover determines at which point to redirect frequencies away from a passive speaker designated small out to the sub for the sub to portray.

Changed the LPF on the subwoofer (via the app) to 120hz. It definetely got better. More mid'ish bass. Thank you. Should I still keep the speaker crossover to 60hz, or increase it to 80hz? Lowest frequency on them are 43hz.

Does setting the crossover for the speakers higher than their lowest possible frequency make them better at focusing on higher frequencies and result in less wear?
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
I'd tend to suggest setting crossovers at at least 80Hz. You're not gaining anything by having them lower than this.
 
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