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Need comment.

vichet hok

Standard Member
Dear all,

I'm using Nikon D300 with nikkor lens 18-200. I just bought one more telephoto lens 85m f/1.8 and i found it difficult to use because it doesn't have VR.

Could you please advice me on these two lens? i'm not a photographer.

By the ways, I also intend to buy a wide angle lens for Landscape and Architecture photo. Any idea if I can afford only $500.USD.

I appreciate for your advice.
Vichet
 

SomeVorn

Established Member
I've just typed some words out but after re-reading your post I'm unsure you'll understand it. May I be just enquire on why you are using quite a complicated camera without any previous photography experience? Its definitely jumping in at the deep end!!

VR is a tool at best, my advice would be to never rely on VR and only use once you've learnt the basics of photography.
For sharp shots (especially architecture), a decent tripod will always give you better results than a VR set up - but understandably tripods aren't always an option.

At long focal lengths of 85mm - 200mm, I've heard many photographers quote a rule where you should never use a shutter speed lower than your focal length. So if you are shooting at 200mm handheld, you should be using a shutter speed of 1/200th. (or faster - that is if you want sharp images).

VR is meant to alter the above rule by giving your 3 more stops - so at 100mm, normally 1/100 would be ideal - with VR you could effectively shoot a steady shot at 1/12 (a Stop being half the previous shutter speed or double if you are going the other way - 100 divided by 2 = 50, 50 divided by 2 = 25, 25 divided by 2 = 12)

To do this you can set the camera to shutter priority - set the desired shutter speed (depending on lens and focal length) and let the camera pick the aperture. Probably a good idea to get to grips with manual metering as well (M setting).

As for the wide angle - a few lenses come to mind - the sigma 10-20mm, nikon 12-24 and the tokina 11-16.
 

T0MAT01

Prominent Member
I just bought one more telephoto lens 85m f/1.8 and i found it difficult to use because it doesn't have VR.

Why do you find it difficult to use?
If you are getting blurry shots from it, then I guess you're using it in dim (indoor?) light?
To solve that you need to get a higher shutter speed to avoid blur, which you can achieve by opening up the aperture (lower number = wider aperture, therefor it lets more light in), or by increasing the ISO.

As SomeVorn says, you should aim for a shutter speed of at least 1/focal length to avoid blur if you haven't got VR.

HTH.
 

vichet hok

Standard Member
Thanks guys:thumbsup:. Actually, i don't have any photography experience:D

I saw the photo on <frickr>, they are very very nice and I just want to make it on my holiday too.
So, what blog can I learn step by step on photography concept? and lens characteristic? One of AV forum guy just gave me www.photoanswers.co.uk:smashin:


vichet
 

vichet hok

Standard Member
Why do you find it difficult to use?
If you are getting blurry shots from it, then I guess you're using it in dim (indoor?) light?
To solve that you need to get a higher shutter speed to avoid blur, which you can achieve by opening up the aperture (lower number = wider aperture, therefor it lets more light in), or by increasing the ISO.

As SomeVorn says, you should aim for a shutter speed of at least 1/focal length to avoid blur if you haven't got VR.

HTH.

Yes, you're right! the problem is indoor.:cool: the f-stop set to 1.8 lowest, when increasing ISO the noise will come out clearly.
 

T0MAT01

Prominent Member
Yes, you're right! the problem is indoor.:cool: the f-stop set to 1.8 lowest, when increasing ISO the noise will come out clearly.

I wouldn't worry about a little noise - ISO 800 should be usable. I find using auto ISO helps with indoor shots.

Your other option is to use flash if you want to keep the noise down, but then it takes another step up the difficulty ladder to get the shots you want.
 

Fozzybear

Prominent Member
I must agree with SomeVorn, you've not picked an easy camera to start with! Don't buy any more lenses or toys for it or it'll increase the amount you have to learn, get to the library and read as much on photography as you can and play with the camera as much as possible. Stick with one lens, don't try to do too much at once and be prepared for a long, long period of learning.

With no photography experience whatsover you're going to have an insanely steep learning curve with such an advanced camera - I would have bought a D60 or even a compact, which would have been much easier to learn with!
 

dazza74

Distinguished Member
Have to admit D300 is one hell of a beginner camera but I'm going to disagree a little bit here. However advanced these cameras are they all have programmed mode at the very least to get you started. I started with a D80 and never felt it was to advanced it just meant I didn't get a bad case of upgradeitus anytime soon. I agree with other posts though you've got to put in the leg work and read up on photography to get the most out of any camera, I never improved at all as a photographer until I started studying the subject more.
 

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