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Need advice on using flat screen tv as a monitor

jetinder

Established Member
I want to buy a new flat screen tv to use as a PC monitor using a dvi - HDMI lead (PC to tv).

Are modern day tvs as good as dedicated monitors ?
 

Qactuar

Distinguished Member
One answer that will make you realise the gulf in quality of some panels: dot pitch.

I lie, three answers; consider brightness and contrast also!
 

jetinder

Established Member
What sort of size/price are you looking at? The differences generally get smaller the less you spend as they end up sharing the same components.

I want a decent make from Samsung, LG, Toshiba or Panasonic.

A 37 inch LCD for around £350-ish is , but I've seen 40 inch LCD for £395, and 42 inch samsung £349

But I don't have room for 42 inch on my desktop.

One answer that will make you realise the gulf in quality of some panels: dot pitch.

I lie, three answers; consider brightness and contrast also!

my 21 inch CRT monitor has 28 dpi and I am happy with the dot pitch but how can get dot pitch info on tv screens ?

I've been told if I get a dvi - HDMI cable my PC's display will be displayed in full HD which means dot pitch will be as good as PC monitor as they all HD.

But I don't know.

What range of brightness and contrast figures would be good.
 

Qactuar

Distinguished Member
Places like Richer Sounds will provide dot pitch and the like. If you're happy with 0.28 pitch then perhaps you'll be fine. For me, it's just nit good enough. The same resolution over a larger panel tends to result in worsening figures from experience. I also find LCD to be far more suitable than plasma for monitor use.
 

EndlessWaves

Distinguished Member
my 21 inch CRT monitor has 28 dpi and I am happy with the dot pitch but how can get dot pitch info on tv screens ?

I've been told if I get a dvi - HDMI cable my PC's display will be displayed in full HD which means dot pitch will be as good as PC monitor as they all HD.

Unless you're got it hooked up to a vintage PC in glorious 480x320 I suspect that's a .28" dot pitch rather than 28dpi.

Although dot pitch was important for CRTs these days it's just another way of expressing resolution and size. Basically:

Resolution / size = dot pitch.

(size * dot pitch = resolution and so on)

HD is the resolution 1920x1080 so the dot pitch will vary depending on the size of the screen.

What range of brightness and contrast figures would be good.

First, ignore the advertised contrast figures. The Advertising Standards Agency has been sleeping on the job again and as a result they've been blown out of all proportion and are completely useless.

I'm not up on TV contrasts but most monitors have tested contrast around 1000:1 with some of the new VA panels achieving closer to 3000:1.

Brightness depends on where you're using it and what you're using it for, Unless it's going to get lots of use in very bright summer sunlight or a dark room then maximum and minimum brightnesses aren't going to be much of a concern.


At around £400 you're looking at a 1920x1200/1920x1080 23-24" good quality monitor, you're not going to get one of the bigger, higher resolution ones at that price. If you're considering a 40" TV then will a 24" monitor be close enough to read (assuming you need to read text on it) and most computer things are sized in pixels?
 
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jetinder

Established Member
Unless you're got it hooked up to a vintage PC in glorious 480x320 I suspect that's a .28" dot pitch rather than 28dpi.
Sorry i meant .28" dot pitch.

I use paintshop pro x2 to digitally clean old 35mm photos and negatives, the 21 inch CRT is ok for this, but its back is taking up to much room so I want some thing slimmer like a flat screen tv and around 37 inches.

At around £400 you're looking at a 1920x1200/1920x1080 23-24" good quality monitor, you're not going to get one of the bigger, higher resolution ones at that price. If you're considering a 40" TV then will a 24" monitor be close enough to read

I have looked at 24 inch monitors but my CRT is square and 24 inch monitors don't look that much bigger than a 21 inch CRT.
 

jetinder

Established Member
I've seen two LCDs one has Contrast Ratio of 60,000 : 1, one has Contrast Ratio of 120,000:1

But if I'm going to use this pure as a monitor to do photoshop work and use my graphics card to set the colours is the contrast ratio really that important ?
 

EndlessWaves

Distinguished Member
I've seen two LCDs one has Contrast Ratio of 60,000 : 1, one has Contrast Ratio of 120,000:1

But if I'm going to use this pure as a monitor to do photoshop work and use my graphics card to set the colours is the contrast ratio really that important ?

As I said, ignore the marketing figures. They're outright lies and I guarantee you won't find any tests of those monitors with actual contrast measured at anything near those values.

Contrast ratio is essentially the darkness of the blacks that can be displayed, this is directly dependant on how much light the LCD matrix can block and can't be improved by profiling/calibration.

Generally the checklist for a photo editing monitor is a VA or IPS type LCD panel (the cheaper TN type has trouble displaying consistent colours on the parts of the screen not directly in front of your eyes) that can be calibrated to a good standard so that all the shades are correct and distinct.

What sort of colour space are you wanting to work in?
 

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