Question Need a fixed IP address - advice please

Discussion in 'Networking & NAS' started by newstuart, Jan 10, 2017.

  1. newstuart

    newstuart
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    Hi

    I am hoping someone may have beeb through similar and be able to assist.

    I work from home and need a fixed IP address for a piece of software I need to be able to run.

    I presetnly have unlimited BT infinity on a personal contract which was only recently renewed a few months ago with 10 months being left. I spoke to BT and have been advised that the only way to obtain a fixed IP address from them is to move to a business package which would incur fees for not ending my existing contract and in addition to this being a higher montly cost they would also charge an extra £5 a month for a fixed IP address. The whole change would cost approx £20 more a month than I presently pay.

    I have been researching and believe I can obtain a fixed IP address via the use of a VPN but no nothing of how this works and what companies / packages are reputable etc.

    Can anyone offer any advice or experience on this?
     
  2. mickevh

    mickevh
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    BT are essentially correct, if you need a fixed IP address you have to pay for one.

    VPN service creates a "tunnel" through the Internet to a VPN endpoint provider and at the "far" end your Internet link is presented to the world there end and if the service provider is prepared to give you a fixed IP address, so be it. However, most people use VPN services to evade territorial limitiations so that they can "masquerade" as being part on one territory when in fact they are in another rather than for obtaining fixed IP addresses. For example to evade the great firewall of China (not that it would work there as they probably ban VPN.)

    However unless you really need a fixed IP address, there's a cheaper mechanism available through something call DynDNS. Using a DyDNS service, you register a domain name (which will cost you, but not much,) then a DynDNS service provider ensures that your registered domain always point to your router even if it's public IP address changes. (Many SOHO routers now include DynDNS functionality to avail this.) You may find that achieves what you want using your existing ISP contract at less cost than buying a public IP address.
     
  3. newstuart

    newstuart
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    Thanks, ill look at DynDNS now and try to get my head around it
     
  4. Synchro

    Synchro
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    DynDNS settings can be added into your BT router. Very easy.
     
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  5. mickevh

    mickevh
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    It's pretty simple:

    Normally a DNS name (say mickworld.blah.blah) is "registered" with a service provider to point to a particular IP address (let's say 1.2.3.4 by way of example.)

    As you've observed, domestic ISP's don't "fix" the public IP address you get unless you pay handsomely for it, so my 1.2.3.4 could potentially change at any time "breaking" my DNS registration. (Let's say my 1.2.3.4 changed to 9.8.7.6, so mickworld.blah.blah is now pointing to the "wrong" place on the Internet.)

    DynDNS get's around this by monitoring the routers external IP address so that if it changes, the registrar of mickworld.blah.blah is notified and "dynamically" updates it's pointer so that mickworld.blah.blah points to 9.8.7.6. As stated, a lot of SOHO routers now include a DynDNS "agent" that does the monitoring and notification.

    As Synchro observes, it's pretty simple to set up, though there is an annual cost, it's not a lot. Some DNS name service providers include DynDNS support as part of the (annual) charge for name registration.

    It's much easier to set up that to describe..! :D
     
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2017
  6. thewhofan

    thewhofan
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    I know it's probably more hassle than it's worth but other IPS offer fixed IP as standard. I am with Uno Communications (Previously named Xilo) and they have fixed IP as standard.
     
  7. simplicity96

    simplicity96
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    There are things like NoIp that will convert your dynamic external ip to a host name giving you a external connection that will change with your ip. You can also get software that will sit locally on your computer and do the same thing. But it depends what you are planning the external connection for.
     
  8. EndlessWaves

    EndlessWaves
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    DynDNS is a specific company, the generic name for the service is dynamic DNS.
     
  9. Synchro

    Synchro
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    I use DynDNS on my BT router. Trouble free.
     
  10. wormvortex

    wormvortex
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    I use noip. It costs nothing a month for the basic package you simple have to click on a link every 30days saying you are still using the service.
     
  11. starfarer

    starfarer
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    I think BT hub also has support for DtDNS which is completely free and set-forget unlike No-IP. DuckDNS is also free but not sure if hub has an option but has windows application to update. I use both of these and get updates from DNS-O-Matic set in router.
     
  12. ruffage

    ruffage
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    Plusnet do static IPs as standard and they're owned by BT :|
     
  13. mickevh

    mickevh
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    Yeah, but it's a separate business "owned" by BT - such is the wacky world of corporate super-monopoly.

    Years ago when Wi-Fi was still fairly new, I used to have dis-proportionally more "problems" with people who had LinkSys Wi-Fi NIC's in their laptops than other brands. But even when Cisco bought them and started branding them as "Cisco LinkSys," they were still crap. :D (They've gotten better since.)
     
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2017

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