NAS Performance Issues

farmeroman

Standard Member
I have just upgraded my network from 100Mb to Gigabit. The infrastructure comprises a Linksys EA4500 router and a TP-Link TL-SG1008D Gigabit switch, both replacements for 100Mb devices. There are two Gigabit enabled desktops (desktop #1 and desktop #2) and a Verbatim 47593 2TB Gigabit enabled NAS drive connected to the switch and a bunch of other mainly 100Mb kit (TV, Blu-ray, etc) connected to the router. The Verbatim NAS is a replacement for a Freecom 1TB NAS device with a 100Mb interface.

I ran some performance tests using LAN Speed Test (from totosoft.com) before, during and after replacing various components, with the following results (100MB file write/read from desktop #1):

100Mb Switch and 100Mb NAS: 44.1Mb/s & 27.9Mb/s
100Mb switch and desktop #2: 92.8Mb/s & 92.6Mb/s
Gigabit switch and 100Mb NAS: 50.1Mb/s & 30.4Mb/s
Gigabit switch and desktop #2: 813.6Mb/s & 588.9Mb/sec
Gigabit switch and Gigabit NAS: 107.3Mb/s & 122.8Mb/sec

Now, I see a roughly 8x (write) and 6x (read) performance improvement from PC-PC transfer when routed through the Gigabit switch, but only a 2.5x and 4x improvement in the PC-NAS performance with Gigabit. Is that to be expected with NAS or is there a tuning (or other) issue here?
 

cjed

Well-known Member
Assuming you're using the Lite version of LAN Speed Test, and you don't have the corresponding server component running on your desktop #2 or NAS, then what you're measuring isn't the really the Network Infrastructure at all, but how fast the devices can transfer data from the network to disk (write) and from disk to the network (read).

The figures you get are in line with a low-end domestic NAS unit.

Note: for this sort of test you should really use a much larger data set to eliminate the effect of RAM caching on the device. Something around 20GB rather than 100MB
 

x1nick

Active Member
Does seem like that you might be hitting disk limits and other file sharing over heads.

I am guessing your 100Mb NAS has really poor performance, I did a search for Verbatim NAS and the review seemed to mention poor performance, but as you haven't listed speicifc models it might be the wrong one.

My first step to debugging speed issues is to run a program called iperf
Iperf | Free software downloads at SourceForge.net

This is useful for testing network speed between two devices.

Not too sure you will be able to run this on your NAS unless it has a command line.
 

ntm1275

Active Member
One of the tell tale signs that a NAS has a low end CPU is when the manufacturer doesn't divulge what CPU it has installed

I've seen low end NAS's with 'gigabit' connections deliver as low as 3 or 4 Megabytes per second transfer rates

Normally the only way to get decent transfer rates is to spend more money

I have a Synology DS1010+ 5 bay NAS which is based on the Intel x86 Atom CPU and this NAS can sustain transfer rates of up to 100 megabytes per second, but it was considerably more than the Verbatim to buy
 

drummerjohn

Well-known Member
15MB\s is about right for a low cost\low power NAS.

Always be suspicous when the manufacturers website doesn't actually give you any proper throughput stats.
 

x1nick

Active Member
15MB\s is about right for a low cost\low power NAS.

Always be suspicous when the manufacturers website doesn't actually give you any proper throughput stats.

When advertising gigabit that is a little disgusting though! Only just over 100 meg speeds that. But then the saying you get what you pay for generally applies to most computer related items when you want performance.

My NAS (self built) will easily get close to 10GbE speeds, completely unnecessary for most people but wanted something high performance and paid an OTT price to get that ha
9.41 Gbits/sec :D
 

Kristian

Well-known Member
When advertising gigabit that is a little disgusting though!

Not really, it's just saying the NIC will connect at gigabit. It would be the same as complaining that a hard disk only kicks out data at 80MB/s when the SATA link is rated at 6Gb/s

My NAS (self built) will easily get close to 10GbE speeds, completely unnecessary for most people but wanted something high performance and paid an OTT price to get that ha
9.41 Gbits/sec

That's impressive!
 

psikey

Distinguished Member
If yours is this one but 2TB Verbatim Gigabit NAS External Hard Drive 1TB - Verbatim Gigabit NAS then speeds are as expected.

Quote "The problems arise when transferring files to and from the NAS device. On our network, at least, it was impossible to get Windows read and write speeds of better than 10.8MB/s and 8.6MB/s respectively, with FTP barely improving that to 11.8MB/s read and 9.4MB/s write.
"

You need to have a much more expensive "high-end" NAS to max out gigabit Ethernet. My very expensive (for what it is) QNAP TS-469Pro can max out gigabit for read & write as can my HP Microserver.

When I first went to a full gigabit network I also could only get ~ 30MB/s and that was due to my older QNAP TS-119Pro+ CPU (1.2GHz single core) being the limiting factor.

At the cheap end I also have a 3TB WD My Book Live which does about 38MB/s write and 75MB/s read which is amazing for a cheap device with only a 800MHz CPU!
 
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