Question NAS drive for Streaming

Baobr

Active Member
Hi I've asked a few questions on here and replies been very helpful so Thanks. Anyone who has replied will know,even though I have been into hi fi all my adult life I'm clueless on modern technology.So I'm asking this.....I bought a node2i back in March 20, very happy with it and finally (I think) got to grips with its useability. I have approximately 650 CDs, some of which I never play and mostly the others I can find on quboz. So is it worth buying a NAS to store them on,more importantly I haven't much clue how they work.In my estimation,they rip and store the cd and I can then access from my node2i. But what quality will it be? I read flac is the way to go but surely the rip can be no better than the original disc. I don't plan on increasing my cd library but now and then I can't find certain music on streaming services. And am I correct in saying I can keep the Nas tucked well out the way. Any help greatly appreciated..btw I'm not really prepared to spend over £500 Cheers
 

John7

Well-known Member
You don't REALLY need a NAS if you have no need to stream to other devices. I notice the Node2i has USB input so in that case all you would need is a USB (Bus powered) portable hard drive to store your ripped music files on. You would rip to FLAC (lossless) to preserve original audio quality.

A 500GB drive (cost about £40.00) should be adequate to store 650 CD rips for direct playback

I use a 500GB SSD PC drive (faster access times than a mechanical hard drive) mounted in a USB enclosure for my CD rips and play back direct via my receiver's USB input.
 
Last edited:

Baobr

Active Member
Thanks John 7, but I don't know how do I RIP the CDs to the USB drive..I have no computer or laptop and moreover the node2i only has a micro USB on the rear....
 

Helix Hifi

Active Member
What you could do if you want it easy, is to buy the Vault2i. That operates like a NAS drive. You just put the cd in the optical drive that is located in front of the unit and you’re ready to go. Then you go in settings on the unit and tick of the reindex menu. That we’ll make the unit upload the albums to your exiting network. You could always buy a cheap portable laptop with either SDD, HDD drive then rip your cds that way. Then buy either Seagate HDD drive or SDD drive, and then connect to the existing USB port behind the Node2i. It could however be that you need to reformat the hard drive you buy, so that Node2i accepts it. Or buy flash drive (the small ones) the use the same USB port. But there can be some problems with the Node2i reindex your music collection. Meaning it can take some time for the music to be downloaded from your network. You just have to try. But you can use the flash drive connected directly to your router. That is much faster, more stability in the long run. You can also connect a hardrive to your router. They we’ll basically operate as makeshift NAS then.
 

John7

Well-known Member
Thanks John 7, but I don't know how do I RIP the CDs to the USB drive..I have no computer or laptop and moreover the node2i only has a micro USB on the rear....

LOL! You said you were thinking of getting a NAS! How were you planning on ripping the disks to a NAS with no computer?

When I looked, the node has a full sized USB input and a smaller “service port” usb socket.

With no facility to rip disks, you’re going to need someone to do it for you....here’s an example


Or you could buy something that rips and stores the CD’s

 
Last edited:

Helix Hifi

Active Member
Hi I've asked a few questions on here and replies been very helpful so Thanks. Anyone who has replied will know,even though I have been into hi fi all my adult life I'm clueless on modern technology.So I'm asking this.....I bought a node2i back in March 20, very happy with it and finally (I think) got to grips with its useability. I have approximately 650 CDs, some of which I never play and mostly the others I can find on quboz. So is it worth buying a NAS to store them on,more importantly I haven't much clue how they work.In my estimation,they rip and store the cd and I can then access from my node2i. But what quality will it be? I read flac is the way to go but surely the rip can be no better than the original disc. I don't plan on increasing my cd library but now and then I can't find certain music on streaming services. And am I correct in saying I can keep the Nas tucked well out the way. Any help greatly appreciated..btw I'm not really prepared to spend over £500 Cheers
If you have about 650 cds, then 1TB is enough. If you rip then in MP3, then most likely 250, 500 gb is enough. You probably have some old cds from 80s (perhaps), they have superior sound vs Spotify etc. If Spotify etc uses the same masters then there is little difference. So regarding sound quality it could be some benefits by ripping your cds. Flac is supported by Microsoft. And Apple supports Alac. If you rip them in in Flac as example there we’ll be no comprise in sound.
 

Baobr

Active Member
He has no way to rip disks.....
Sorry Guys you have both lost me entirely. So the Node2i definitely doesn't have a full size usb port.Ive looked on net and I see a ripcaster that rips, then acts as a nas! No I have no way of ripping my CDs at the moment. I'm aware of the Vault but don't want to splash out £1100 when I have the streaming facility already. And when listeni to the discs I don't want to lose quality..I.e 1144kbps as opposed to 320
 

Helix Hifi

Active Member
It has a USB A outlet. Let’s say you want to use 500 pound, then there are some cheaper options. Buy the cheapest laptop with or without an optical drive. Most likely you need too buy an external optical drive either way. Then you download E.AC (Exact Audio Copy) to your Pc. E.A.C talks to database that makes sure the cd well get a perfect copy. This because you can see if there are some issues with the cd copy. Then buy portable flash drive. After that you connect either to your router, Node2i. Should set you back around 500 pounds.
 

Helix Hifi

Active Member
Then you put the cd in the optical and rip it. The software we’ll give you several options on which codec you want too rip to.
 

Helix Hifi

Active Member
Codec is Flac as an example. It is probably the best option for you. Because it supports Metadata (album art). I presume you do have an iPad, tablet of some kind. Then the album art well pop up like any streaming service.
 

John7

Well-known Member

From the blue sound node 2i web page;​

CONNECTIVITY​

Network​

Gigabit Ethernet RJ45
Wi-Fi 5 (802.11ac, dual-band)

USB​

1 x Type-A port for connection to USB memory sticks (Fat32 or NTFS formatted) and supported peripherals
1 x Type-B (mini) for product servicing

Hint - it’s below the LAN port.

From the user manual;

13 USB (TYPE A): Connect a USB mass storage device to the USB input. Typical USB mass storage devices compatible with the NODE 2i include portable flash memory devices and external hard drives (FAT32 formatted).

FLAC files are lossless full resolution, no loss of quality from the original CD.
 

Helix Hifi

Active Member
OP, I hope you well figure it out in the end. Trust me, most people have been in the same situation like you are now. What you eventually are trying to accomplish is to use your exiting network as a file sharing network.
 

ash1942

Standard Member
I’d steer clear of a NAS if you haven’t got a computer to manage it. It just becomes a liability to be attacked if left on. I’ve had the same Synology NAS for about 8 years. It’s not the most efficient drive out there but is certainly capable of streaming music (mine is not a model designed for streaming though).
However it can be configured to be accessed over the internet (can’t remember if that is default config or not) and that’s not something to be left unmanaged.
The logs on mine show failed login attempts from countries all over the world.
I’ve since locked down my network and the NAS to prevent further attempts.
As other posters have pointed out you are going to probably need some other device to do the ripping so I would suggest a second hand laptop and a USB HDD then look at network streaming programs to run off the laptop. Unfortunately there’s going to be some learning curve regardless of which way you go.
Ironically for me I am moving away from using modern technology for music streaming out storage and going back to simpler physical collections. Too many random issues with tech that have to be sorted. You can’t beat the simplicity of taking out a CD or LP and just putting in/on the player and pressing play.
 

Helix Hifi

Active Member
Ironically for me I am moving away from using modern technology for music streaming out storage and going back to simpler physical collections. Too many random issues with tech that have to be sorted. You can’t beat the simplicity of taking out a CD or LP and just putting in/on the player and pressing play.
Sort agree with you. Sometimes the software can get buggy, But the ritual of firing up your old CD player is good for both the mind-soul.:clap: Still streaming is the new norm. Still many times I’m lazy.. ;)So I just the preferred software-hardware to stream my music using my network. But OP as you mentioned need too google a lot to get it right.
 

mikes48

Distinguished Member
(Exact Audio Copy)
Might just be me, but I wouldn't recommend EAC. I did try it, but the options are endless and I found it very un-intuitive and frustrating - although it is free.

I bought dBpoweramp - cost about £30 and it's a doddle to use.

You can also rip CDs to FLAC with Windows Media Player but I suspect it's less accurate than the ones mentioned above and it can be very hit and miss - or impossible - with album art.

Just my two penn'orth :).
 

Old Novice2

Novice Member
Question rather than a reply I'm afraid but others here seem to have some good knowledge so I'd be grateful for input: I've recently 'upgraded' my system with a Linn Accurate Hub - to give the quality range I'm looking for. I have an old Arcan CD player which is on the blink. I'm advised to get a ripping device rather than just a replacement. Like others, I like the ritual of using physical discs but I'm running out of space. About 500 CDs. So I'd like something that can can both rip or play them [via the Linn hub] A Naim Unity Core has been suggested as appropriate. However its £2k so pretty expensive and since I have a Synology NAS with spare capacity and I can stream music via the Hub, I'd be paying for facilities that I don't need. The Innuos Zen is cheaper but is the quality as good? What other options are available for similar quality playing and ripping? Much appreciated
 

Baobr

Active Member
I’d steer clear of a NAS if you haven’t got a computer to manage it. It just becomes a liability to be attacked if left on. I’ve had the same Synology NAS for about 8 years. It’s not the most efficient drive out there but is certainly capable of streaming music (mine is not a model designed for streaming though).
However it can be configured to be accessed over the internet (can’t remember if that is default config or not) and that’s not something to be left unmanaged.
The logs on mine show failed login attempts from countries all over the world.
I’ve since locked down my network and the NAS to prevent further attempts.
As other posters have pointed out you are going to probably need some other device to do the ripping so I would suggest a second hand laptop and a USB HDD then look at network streaming programs to run off the laptop. Unfortunately there’s going to be some learning curve regardless of which way you go.
Ironically for me I am moving away from using modern technology for music streaming out storage and going back to simpler physical collections. Too many random issues with tech that have to be sorted. You can’t beat the simplicity of taking out a CD or LP and just putting in/on the player and pressing play.
 

Baobr

Active Member
I have a cd player,so I think I'll go with ash1942 just seems a lot of faffing around and more expense.....just wanted to reduce my box count and space.. Thanks for replying
 

Helix Hifi

Active Member
Question rather than a reply I'm afraid but others here seem to have some good knowledge so I'd be grateful for input: I've recently 'upgraded' my system with a Linn Accurate Hub - to give the quality range I'm looking for. I have an old Arcan CD player which is on the blink. I'm advised to get a ripping device rather than just a replacement. Like others, I like the ritual of using physical discs but I'm running out of space. About 500 CDs. So I'd like something that can can both rip or play them [via the Linn hub] A Naim Unity Core has been suggested as appropriate. However its £2k so pretty expensive and since I have a Synology NAS with spare capacity and I can stream music via the Hub, I'd be paying for facilities that I don't need. The Innuos Zen is cheaper but is the quality as good? What other options are available for similar quality playing and ripping? Much appreciated
I’m not sure if you have an old computer laying around? Apple, Microsoft software based? If you do you can rip your cds by using the preferred software you prefer: ITunes, E.A.C,dbPoweramp. There are tons of ripping software online. But remember the PC etc needs an optical drive included. Or you can buy an external optical drive at computer shops. If you do have these options, you can save a lot of money. You can then transfer the local files (music files) to an portable HDD drive, or SDD drive. Then plug in the hard drive either your router or the Linn. That are many options. If not Bluesound Vault2i can rip, operate like NAS/ripping music server. Without the options I mentioned. Then you have basically two pairs of NAS drives. The old NAS can be connected directly to the Vault2i should you require more space. But 500 cds only require around 1TB, or 500 GB depending on which codec you use. If you wanna use Flac as an example then then the 1 Tb is ideal. But if the Linn can talk to Vault2i that I’m not certain of. I think your best option is to use the options I mentioned first... Other forum members may more about Linn. I’m not familiar with that brand. Just read Linn is cult brand, but in good way in the hifi community. Ps, you send an email to Bluesound and ask if you can use the Linn.
 
Last edited:

Helix Hifi

Active Member
I have a cd player,so I think I'll go with ash1942 just seems a lot of faffing around and more expense.....just wanted to reduce my box count and space.. Thanks for replying

You could always ask a friend if he/she can rip them. Or use the alternatives online.
 

[email protected]

Active Member
If you have a PC, it will work as a NAS for this purpose. I have my music in iTunes on an iMac. My Powernode 2i can access the directory use by iTunes. It doesn't have to be iTunes. You just need some music program to download and organize the songs. Then the Node 2i can access the directory where they are stored.

Basically a PC or Mac looks like a NAS. They use the same network protocols. This works best for a desktop system that's always on. If the only computer you have is a laptop, it will have to be on and connected to the network for the Node 2i to access it.
 

jamieu

Active Member
Question rather than a reply I'm afraid but others here seem to have some good knowledge so I'd be grateful for input: I've recently 'upgraded' my system with a Linn Accurate Hub - to give the quality range I'm looking for. I have an old Arcan CD player which is on the blink. I'm advised to get a ripping device rather than just a replacement. Like others, I like the ritual of using physical discs but I'm running out of space. About 500 CDs. So I'd like something that can can both rip or play them [via the Linn hub] A Naim Unity Core has been suggested as appropriate. However its £2k so pretty expensive and since I have a Synology NAS with spare capacity and I can stream music via the Hub, I'd be paying for facilities that I don't need. The Innuos Zen is cheaper but is the quality as good? What other options are available for similar quality playing and ripping? Much appreciated

Given you have the Synology and Linn already I'll base the answer on that.

There are four parts to this:

1) Setup a shared Folder on your NAS to hold your music files, for the same of simplicity call it 'Music'


Put a test FLAC file in that folder, you can download one off the internet for free if you don't have one to hand.

2) Setup up a 'Media Server' on your NAS so that the Linn can see your files on the NAS (ie. the /Music folder you created above).

Effectively you need to install and configuring a DLNA/UPnP server — which is a standard way of serving data up to a network streamer (a DLNA renderer). There are lots of different DLNA/UPnP servers you can install, but at a high level they all do the same job — serving audio files, metadata and listings (album listings, artist listings, genre listings etc.) up to your network streamer (in your case a Linn Accurate Hub)

The easiest one to configure on a Synology is the in-built one that comes with the NAS as it's pre installed.

(UPDATE: the following strikethrough info is incorrect, thanks to @Cebolla for the correction here)

Although to complicate matters Linn use their own variant of DLNA called 'Open Home' (see below). These are the UPnP/DLNA 'media servers' Linn recommend.

Linn uses their own variant/modification of the standard DLNA/UPnP protocol called 'Open Home' which the Synology media server doesn't support. You can enable the additional 'Open Home' features by additional installing the BubbleUPnP package along side it, but that in itself adds some complexity for a novice.
(thanks to Cebolla for the correction here)

So probably the easiest way is to install Minimserver on your NAS which does support Linn's OpenHome variant out of the box and is available in the Synology Package Centre. Later on you might want to look at these instructions which will allow you to run the very latest version. But for now stick with the version found in the Synology 'Package Centre'. The downside is Minimiserver's documentation is a little verbose and the configuration a little opaque, but out of the box it should do the basics.

Hopefully not as complex as that wall of text makes it seem :)

3) Install a DLNA/UPnP 'control app' to let you select and play music

Linn actually provide a mobile and desktop app to do this called Kazoo which you may already have installed. Fire it up and you should now be able to see both the /Music folder on the NAS and your Linn network streamer and stream music from one to the other.

If that doesn't work check you have Minimserver correctly setup and pointing to your /Music folder. Also make sure you have some FLAC files in that folder.

4) Rip your CD's

Finally if that all works, you can get on with the job of ripping your CDs.

As others have said there are lots of apps to do this, but if you want an easy life pay the £30 for dbPoweramp CD ripper and set it to rip at the default lossless FLAC 44.1/16bit setting.

Personally I'd rip them to your PC or Mac and then once ripped move them over to the shared /Music folder that should now be appearing on your network as shared volume.

---

Good luck!

(tbh. the Linn eco-system is making this all a bit more complex than it needs to be. Newer network streamers like the Node 2i can just view the network share directly as a standard Windows/SMB shared folder and index the files themselves which makes the setup far easier. But if you have the Linn network steamer already it will all work fine and of equal sound quality to newer devices once setup).

Or just skip UPnP/DLNA & Kazoo completely

If setting up Minimserver ends up being too much hassle, or you just can't face the hassle — and you don't mind paying — you could just switch to a 3rd party software package like Roon (which you can one-click install on your NAS or desktop PC) and point it to your shared /Music folder on your NAS and it will index the files and happily connect to the Linn. In addition it also has a far nicer/richer interface and better mobile/desktop apps than Linn's Kazoo software (in fact it makes Kazoo look positively dated by comparison). But it does come with an additional cost. Although one additional bonus of Roon is that if you attach an off-the-shelf USB CD drive to your NAS or PC it can automatically rip the CD when inserted and add it to the local Roon library for you without any intervention.
 
Last edited:

Old Novice2

Novice Member
Thanks for the help. It seems that ripping CDs should be pretty simply on a laptop with a cd drive. I was unsure of quality doing it this was but several people seem to suggest no loss of quality. Looks like there is no mid cost device that will both rip CDs and play them in good quality so as my CD player dies I guess I just ween myself of the 'disc handling' feeling.
 

The latest video from AVForums

LG G1 OLED EVO Review (OLED65G1)
Subscribe to our YouTube channel

Latest News

Astell&Kern launches the SE180 portable player
  • By Andy Bassett
  • Published
Disney picks up Sony's cinema releases post Netflix in US
  • By Andy Bassett
  • Published
What's new on Netflix UK for May 2021
  • By Andy Bassett
  • Published
Sony unveils X-Series wireless speakers
  • By Andy Bassett
  • Published
AVForums Podcast: 21st April 2021
  • By Phil Hinton
  • Published

Full fat HDMI teeshirts

Support AVForums with Patreon

Top Bottom