NAS capacity?

Discussion in 'Networking & NAS' started by Devster1, Feb 4, 2009.

  1. Devster1

    Devster1
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    All the below NAS's are spec'd as 2TB, (2x 1TB?). What is preventing you from sticking in say 2x 1.5TB drives taking the capacity to 3TB? Or even 2x2TB drives?

    Netgear RND-2000
    QNAP TS-209 Pro
    D-link DNS-323

    Has anyone tried this?
    What do you think would be the implications?

    I dont want to buy a NAS with only 2x drive bays and then have to upgrade the whole unit in the future as I need more space?
     
  2. ntm1275

    ntm1275
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    The implications could be:-

    1. Larger Drives are not supported by manufacturer
    2. Compatibility problems
    3. Other problems like hibernation issues

    After reading many post on different NAS forums, 'Green Drives' like the ones by Western Digital do not tend to work particularily well with NAS's

    All of the above points may or may not get fixed in future NAS firmware updates, but until the NAS manufacturer states that they are supported as compatible, you take the risk of spending money on a drive that may not work or not work properly

    Most NAS's use a stripped down version of Linux, and are tailored to the manufacturers specifications of a particular NAS device including hard drive compatibility

    However, if you buy a NAS now, it may take 2 years for the NAS manufacturer to bring a current new drive within their compatibility lists, and after two years they may stop issuing new firmware updates because your NAS may be seen as old hardware, and only their new hardware will be compatible

    I hope the above makes sense!!!!
     
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2009
  3. anth.payne

    anth.payne

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    If you want a low cost high capacity NAS - build one yourself...

    Take a look at

    Lime Technology, LLC A free NAS OS (for your 1st 3 HDDs)

    Just build a standard PC - if you didnt want to use unRAID - you can use Windows...
     
  4. t72bogie

    t72bogie
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    nothing - with the latest firmware you can have >1TB drives in the Netgear ReadyNAS :smashin:
     
  5. mossym

    mossym
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    just to point out, i have a green WD 1TB drive working in a Synology DS108j with no issues, but ntm is right, they have caused issues in a lot of nas.
     
  6. Devster1

    Devster1
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    thanks for all the responses guys, i think i would prefer to buy an off the shelf NAS as if I built one myself I know I would end up going overboard as usual :rolleyes:

    sounds good. Do you know if you can easily upgrade the drives if they are working in a RAID-1 array?

    i.e. if I bought say a Netgear ReadyNAS and 2x 1TB drives. Then in a years time I wanted to upgrade the 2x drives to 2x 2TB drives. Would it just be a simple case of removing drive 2, inserting new drive, waiting for RAID array to mirror data onto new drive, and then inserting second new drive into slot 1?
     
  7. markpaq

    markpaq
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    I've not had much experience of RAID setups on consumer equipment but when I've had to perform this function on enterprise kit (HP/Compaq) it requires dedicated controllers which allow you to expand RAID volumes on the fly.


    What you're describing would work but......you'd still end up with a 1Tb mirror set. The RAID controller would only use 1Tb of the replacement disk, it won't automatically expand the volume. Your best bet would be to make a backup or ghost image of your data, remove the disks and replace both at once, create the mirror then restore.
     
  8. anth.payne

    anth.payne

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    This is why I like unRaid...


    unRAID Server is a Network Attached Storage server operating system designed to boot from a USB Flash device and specifically designed for digital media storage:
    • Digital Video
    • Digital Music
    • Digital Images/Photos
    Unique RAID System

    unRAID Server employs a unique RAID technology which provides for great configuration flexibility:
    • Any combination of IDE and SATA hard drives may be used.
    • All the hard drives do not need to be the same size or speed.
    • Hard drives not being accessed may be spun down.
    • Can rebuild any single failed hard drive.
    True Incremental Storage

    Unlike other RAID systems, unRAID Server supports true incremental storage expansion. You can add capacity by adding more hard drives or by upgrading existing hard drives. This is a great way to make use of older, smaller hard drives you might have laying around.
    For example, you might start out by installing one or two new high capacity hard drives along with some number of smaller hard drives you already own. Later, you might decide to replace one of the smaller drives, and unRAID Server will restore the data of the smaller drive onto the new drive, and then expand the file system to incorporate the full size of the new drive. ​
    Better Fault Tolerance

    Similar to other RAID systems, unRAID Server permits reconstruction of a single failed hard drive. However in the unlikely event of multiple hard drive failures, data loss would be isloated to only those hard drives which failed. In traditional RAID systems, multiple simultaneous hard drive failure results in complete data loss. ​
    [​IMG]
    Network Attached Storage

    unRAID Server is compatible with Windows Networking. Individual data disks appear as disk shares under My Network Places. In addition, unRAID Server provides a composite view of all your storage through the use of User shares.
    User shares permit you to view your storage as if it were one large file system, even though each data disk has it’s own file system. This lets you define share names such as Movies, Video, Photos, etc. whose actual contents are spread out among multiple hard drives.
    Installed On A USB Flash Storage Device

    unRAID server is designed to be installed on, and boot from, a USB Flash Storage device. All configuration data is also kept on the Flash; the hard drives are only used to store user data. ​
     
  9. markpaq

    markpaq
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    Looks good, I'd personally be happier with hardware rather than software RAID though.

    ;)
     
  10. Devster1

    Devster1
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    ok so could you remove the mirror/RAID-1 setup, (obviously hoping that you would keep data on one disc)
    remove disc 2 and replace with higher capacity disc
    copy data onto disc 2
    remove disc 1 and replace with higher capacity disc
    restore RAID-1 configuration

    would this work? Sorry but can you tell I'm new to all this RAID stuff, so just trying to get an understanding of whats possible and whats not.

    Thanks
     
  11. t72bogie

    t72bogie
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    yes - thats exactly how Netgear's X-raid works - its designed for ease of use for consumers ...to make raid easy for non-techies ...Ive had a 4 bay one for a few years, before Netgear bought Infrant...an absolute doddle IMO - you can put drives in/out willy nilly, different sizes no problem ..and its sorts it out :smashin:
     
  12. Devster1

    Devster1
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  13. t72bogie

    t72bogie
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    yes, I upgraded my "old" ReadyNAS NX+ 4 bay jobbie from 250GB to 750Gb drives quite a while ago...yes it took quite some time - nearly a day total i think, of replace one drive, wait for it to synch, replace next drive and so on...but all went smoothly
     
  14. Devster1

    Devster1
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    cool, so the netgear seems to do everything I am after. i just need to save the pennies now then...
     

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