1. Join Now

    AVForums.com uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Nad 370 jumper question

Discussion in 'AV Receivers & Amplifiers' started by Pollywoggle, Oct 27, 2004.

  1. Pollywoggle

    Pollywoggle
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2000
    Messages:
    1,441
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    51
    Location:
    South Shropshire
    Ratings:
    +81
    In reviews of the the nad c370 integrated amplifier, I have seen criticism of the metal jumpers on the back, they are supposedly cheap/nasty and improvements can be made by replacing them.
    Does anyone know how and with what to do this easily, the explainations I saw were not very clear?
    (Me no technical) :confused:
    Any advice would be much appreciated!
     
  2. Roam

    Roam
    Guest

    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Ratings:
    +0
    To do it simply just replace the jumpers with another pair of interconnects like the ones you are using from source to amp but preferably shorter. If however you are handy with a soldering iron you can get better results by making your own. If you can't be bothered making your own Russ Andrews sells some for jumper use:

    http://www.russandrews.com/product....&customer_id=PAA2878107204014SCERFFHDWKMMEWKB

    Originally I was using 25cm of D102 with some Eichmann's ( on my NAD 320bee ) and soldered them like VDH do with their box set of D102, ground at both ends with the sheild connected to ground at the pre side and got a small improvement over using the metal jumpers. However I recently changed them with some advice I got from my cable supplier and noticed the sound is now better again. This is the advice I got from him word for word for using D102:



    If you want to get even higher quality from your jumper cables then heres
    what you do; (you`d probably have to use new Eichmanns)
    Cut one of the lengths in half,10-12 cm (the golden rule with any cable
    except a suppression cable is the shorter the better). Obviously it won`t be
    flexible enough to bend round so now remove the two central cores and bin
    the rest. The shielding of jumper cables does more harm than good,
    A: the central leads will now be too short and bent to pick up R/F
    interference, the shielding however is designed to collect and disperse it
    into the amp/component - The extra length caused by and the shielding itself
    induces more interference than it solves, raising the noise floor and
    lowering the signal to noise ratio!
    B: The amp already has a negative connection running through the casing/
    mounting plate. The quality of the material used for the negative signal
    does not have a direct sound on the quality of the musical signal - only
    it`s ability to return (by the quickest route) and drain the return signal
    as effectively as possible . Having the second negative/ground connection
    between the sockets can cause a very slight, barely audible ground loop
    resulting in extra feedback and background noise.

    Twist the two leads together and use them both for the positive signal (the
    twist increases is resistance to any interference that could otherwise
    affect the signal)
    It also gives the cable Zero capacitance as there is no negative signal
    to cause "phase cancelling" from crossover between the signals!
    Lastly - doubling up the cores gives extra depth for the slightly more
    powerful loads between pre-power amp sections! (this is how the MC-Gold is
    wired when bought with factory fitted RCA but with the shield acting as
    negative/ signal return).

    If you wish to increase it`s resistance to R/F interference even more or,
    just make it look a little different then take a third lead, (from the MK V?
    Or use all brown on one channel and all white the other?) and plait them in
    the Kimber style! Connect the 3rd lead to ground/ signal return at preamp
    side only and use the other two for positive as mentioned before. If you do
    this then plait them starting with the 3rd lead in the middle and the
    positives as the outer leads.

    If you really can`t be bothered to go through all this then you can just
    cut the negative signal at the power amp end of your jumpers but, i promise
    you if you go through the (20 min?) hassle of doing it you will notice as
    big a difference as when you first replaced the jumpers!

    Hope that helps some.
     
  3. Pollywoggle

    Pollywoggle
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2000
    Messages:
    1,441
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    51
    Location:
    South Shropshire
    Ratings:
    +81
    That's excellent Grinder, thanks a lot!
     

Share This Page

Loading...