My Philips 50PUS7505/12 review.

There are so many TV’s to choose from these days. From 22” (that was a large screen TV in the 80’s and early 90’s, right up to 85”, and even bigger if you live in the far east and have a budget that can stretch. There’s never been so many brands as well, but some are not as they seem. Many once top brands have stopped manufacturing TV sets, and licensed the name out to other less well known companies, perhaps with a perceived drop in quality, such as JVC, Hitachi, and Toshiba, whilst companies famous for other products like Blaunkpunkt and Polaroid had no TV heritage, but still licensed their name to other companies to manufacture TV’s and try and a capture a large share of the budget market.

A lot of these companies not only manufacture once great names, but also own brand TV’s for supermarkets such as Asda and Tesco in the UK, or Walmart in the US. And TV manufacture may be licensed to different companies for different markets, such as America, Europe and the far East. In fact, only one major player who licensed the brand name out has reclaimed that name for self produced Televisions. That is Sharp, who after being bought out by Foxconn, bought majority shareholdings in both of the companies they licensed their brands to in Europe and America. In truth, there are only four recognised major players who make their own sets and even some of their entry level models are produced by the aforementioned companies who make TV’s for the supermarkets.

The big five are, Sony, Samsung, Panasonic, LG and as an outsider Philips who license the brand out to other companies for European and American markets, but only because their high end sets are really well specified. And snapping at their heels is state owned Chinese manufacturer Hisense, who Iare trying to copy Samsung and LG by also moving into white goods. And with Hisense starting to gain a reputation for quality well specified televisions at a low price point that are well reviewed by the press. With prices for a 43” 4K set starting from £250.00 it’s tempting to go for a budget model, and hope you get good picture quality, when in reality you might end up regretting it. It’s interesting to note that in the United States, the second best selling TV brand is relatively budget names. Called TCL. And with up and coming brand Hisense joining them, and gaining a better reputation in Europe, the up and coming brands could end up equalling if not bettering the major players in the UK market.

So what’s the budget model being reviewed today. We are looking at the Philips 50PUS7505, a European mode. Manufactured by TP Vision in Poland, who license the Philips brand from the Dutch Parent company, it Currently has an RRP of for £399.00, and can be found at Argos, Amazon, AO. Com (all kithe A’s),for around £350.00, but had been reduced to £320.00 0 in the Black Friday sales, and from the start of December until Christmas Eve sold at the full Price. At the price of £320.00, on paper it looked an exceptionally good buy, with specs most manufacturers could only dream of at this price point, and even at £350.00 it seems a good buy. At that lower price, you’d be forgiven for thinking it’s a 2019 model with HDR 10 and not much else specs hiwise. But this TV is a 2020 model featuring not only HDR10+, but High Level Gamut colour, and, surprise surprise for a £320.00 TV, a Freesat HD tuner, Dolby Vision and Dolby Atmos alongside the almost standard (only Samsung omit this) Freview+ HD tuner. But what makes an attractive proposition on paper doesn’t always translate to the screen very well. How many times have you bought well specified unbranded gadgets from Amazon with high specs that don’t live up to your expectations?

It’s main branded rivals in the sub £400.00 price point is Samsung’s 50 Inch UE50TU7100, and LG’s 50UN7000, £30 and £20 cheaper respectively. Neither appear to support Dolby Atmos, and the LG is, According to Amazon, only HDR 10, and not 10 plus. And Samsung’s entry level models, aren’t truly smart, as, according to several Argos reviews, they need a WiFi dongle to connect to the Internet. So on paper, the Philips seems to beat them, but what about the real world? Does it hold it’s own against these two rivals?

So let’s start with the features of this Television. The big headline grabber is the 50 inch screen. It doesn’t say in the manual if it’s an IPS panel, with wider viewing angles, so it’s safe to assume It’s just a VA panel with slightly better contrast. It doesn’t appear to have local dimming, or edge lightening for a more consistent picture at the edges, but it performs well in that respect, and won’t be an issue for all but most demanding viewers. We’ll go into more detail when we look at picture quality later. There’s three main specifications where on paper this set beats most of it’s rivals at just over the £300.00 mark. Firstly, it’s HD10+, which betters the competition who only have HDR10, and miss out on improvements 10+ offers. In fact, only Samsung’s 7000 series has 10+, and even LG’s entry level screens don’t have this. Another big plus is support for Dolby Vision, which the majority of £300.00 competitors don’t have. Alongside that, DTS comes as standard for improved performance. Add to that support for Dolby Atmos, alongside a built in Freesat HD tuner as well as Freeview Play HD, and you have a well rounded entry level Telly for £350.00. 4K demos run well, and you ger a HDR and Atmos notification popping up when viewing those content types. It’s arguably the best specced TV in its class, lacking only Google Home Mini or Alex’s support, which some cheaper TV’s have. But does having a great set of specs make for a great TV? Remember the early days of digital cameras where Megapixel counts were promoted to the max by unknown budget brands? It wasn’t the number of pixels on the sensor, but how well they were used by the sensor and image processor that determined final image quality. The bigger each pixel was meant better image quality, which needed a bigger sensor to reduce noise, and fitting the same number on a sensor half the size only gave terrible quality images. It’s similar with LED panels. So is the 50PUS7505 the real deal, or a cheap pretender to the throne?

Aesthetically it’s an average looking television. This is a shiny black model, although it’s also available in silver with the model number ending 7555 instead of 7505. At a centimetre wide the bezel is quite wide, but not excessive. This has the advantage of making the TV look bigger than those sets of the same screen size that have either no, or very small bezels of 1 or two mm. The nameplate sticks out of the front of the bottom bezel, giving the set a classy finish, like a lot of high end TV’s. It’s a little deeper than many models, and isn’t as thin as the high end LG OLED models released in 2020 with a thickness of 5mm, but budget models aren’t expected to be that thin. Where the main inputs are the chassis protrudes a little more than I’d expect, but it’s still Vesa compatible. Weighing in at just 10.6 KG, it’s lightweight and easy to wall mount. The set has Plenty of inputs. There’s the now average 3 HDMI 2.0 B sockets, all of which feature Arc (Audio Return Channel) capability. Many budget TV’s with 3 HDMI sockets only feature one ARC socket, so this is a plus. Sadly, they’re not eARC HDMI 2.1 compatible, but as I’ve already stated, this is Philips entry level 4K series, and at this price point it’s not expected. Two USB 3.0 sockets, a coaxial aerial socket, a satellite connector for the built in Freesat tuner, and an optical out connector for 5.1 channel audio is also included. Two speakers are built in, and they are downwards firing. There’ll be more about them in the sound quality section.

A good set of apps can make or break a TV, and whilst it’s not an Android operating system, there’s the usual suspects of BBC, ITV, 4 and 5, along with Amazon Prime, Netflix, Freeview Play HD and Rakuten play. Freeview Play, let’s you watch catch up TV from it’s built in guide, but you need an Internet collection. The only main app missing is Disney+. There’s a good selection other apps you can download from, with many pay per view, as well as weather, Christian apps, kids, and a lot more. A best of selection pops up when you hit the “Windows” button, but it’s nothing to do with Windows. A fuller list is under the “All apps” tab. I’d say there’s around 30 or apps to choose from. A lot of users have complained of apps not working, but to be honest, I’ve not seen any app I’ve tried that hasn’t loaded. Some, like CBN, take their time loading, but do work reasonably well. A 5GHZ WiFi set up is required for optimal HD app loading times, and the TV was in an upstairs room with a good distance from the router. I haven’t experienced any lag in apps opening, even on my crowded 2.4 GHZ WiFi and the faster uncongested 5GHZ Internet my Router is currently using.

The TV is capable of receiving Free to air digital channels via Freeview, Sky HD via a sky box, and it’s built in it Freesat tuner, which boasts over 700 channels, though many are repeated several times in the guide, and a lot are subscription only. All three of the above methods seem to work well. though are dependant on both atmospheric conditions, placement of the satellite dish or aerial, and signel strength from the transmitter or satellite up in space. It seems much better at receiving a signal than my You View box attached to the Samsung Q80T in the living room, which drops out a lot.

The panel is a 4K panel, and doesn’t seem to suffer from edge to edge dimming issues, despite the fact that the TV doesn’t have Local Dimming built in. It’s reasonably bright, though the brightness level isn’t quoted. It supports from 480p right up to 4K and does it well. I’ll go into more detail about image quality soon. There’s no information about who makes the panel, though a 2013 post from TP Vision (joint venture between TPV and Philips) stated TPV was the fourth largest panel manufacturer in the world at that time.

Sound is very acceptable for an entry level television. Some 5.1 broadcasts sound odd, the Thunderbirds HD Box Set on the Shout Factory app made some voices sound almost like a loud echo as it tries to emulate 5.1 through the two downwards firing speakers. You can set the sound to mono to work around this, but most modern programmes sound fine in stereo or multichannel. There could be more bass from the speakers but it's good enough to do a reasonably good job, and the presets seem to give a more than adequate performance for a budget TV, but there’s also a custom mode setting with a 5 band graphic equaliser tucked away in the advanced sound settings for those who like to tinker. There’s ARC HDMI and optical inputs to connect either a Dolby Atmos (ARC) or 5.1 (optical – optical can’t output more than 5.1 Channels) surround sound system. The television has a 5.1 surround sound currently attached. Without the sub woofer attached there is a noticeable improvement in sound quality over the built in speakers, but, with a sub attached a massive and more dynamic sound is achieved.

The main TV menu/interface is found under the home button, and as with a lot of smart televisions, settings tend to be buried at the side of the apps. For example, toggling the TV button setting between the aerial and satellite inputs, and selecting other inputs like HDMI and USB. In this respect the Philips indeed does disappoint. There’s no dedicated settings button on the comprehensive remote control like you get with most remotes, but you soon get used to the interface, which is Philips own Saphi operating system, based on a combination of Linux and Android TV. This does mean you can’t side load native android Apps. As mentioned before, there’s plenty of apps, but a lot of them are unknown, but with access to some well known shows. The lack of easy navigation to settings, and other features is somewhat offset by easy access to apps with just one press of the home button, whilst Free view Play HD, Rakuten Play, and Netflix have their own dedicated direct access buttons on the remote, which is the next thing we’ll look at.

The remote is not the of best build quality, feeling plasticky, and it’s on a par with the main remote for my mid range Samsung Q80T, which is poor for an upper mid range TV, and average for a budget TV, yet this remote is is very well laid out. A large Diamond shape with central OK button replaces the more traditional circle, but does essentially the same job, doubling up as both a channel changer and programme selector in guide mode. In the middle of the volume button is a mute button, and between the channel up/down is a TV button that let’s you go straight to either the Aerial fed or satellite fed input, depending upon which of the two inputs have been selected. The information button, input selector and WiFi setup buttons are on a row just below the power button which is at the very top centre of the remote, and not in a top corner as on most TV remotes. The WiFi setup button looks like the Microsoft Windows logo, and once the TV is connected to the Internet, it changes to a selection of “Featured Apps” you might want to add (most are pay to view). The full list of available apps can be found under “All Apps” tab under the apps section. Many of the dedicated buttons, like the guide, wife setup, and input selector feature icons, and can be confused for other things, for example, the guide button can easily be misguided for a menu or settings button. Indeed, there isn’t a menu button, but there is an options button which looks like a menu or settings button featuring programme info, subtitles and subtitle language settings, audio language and channel info. The menu button, it can be argued is just the home button which features the main smart TV interface with sub menu’s like Samsung use in their mid and high end Tizen OS powered televisions. It takes a little time getting used to the layout of both the buttons and the home button interface but after a few weeks you’ll be using it like a pro.

The 50pus7555 English manual covers both the 7505 and 7555 models (05 is black, 55 is silver) and the manual is well laid out with clear pictures to illustrate it, and is easy to follow. It’s in a downloadable PDF format, and runs to over 75 pages. It’s downloadable from the Philips.co.uk website but make sure you don’t accidentally download the 7805 series manual which has built in Ambilight and Alexa, like I did.

So it’s time for the main event, Picture quality. Picture quality can make or break a TV. The TV has been tested with 480p, 560p, 1080p and 4K UHD HDR and Atmos content. 480p Free view is, as with most sets, acceptable (even my Sansung Q80T) and not much more. If you see standard definition channels looking much better, they’re probably being broadcast in 560p. I’d normally expect worse from a budget set. You don’t buy a 4K HDR TV to watch SD programmes, you buy it for HD and 4K viewing. Some cheaper sets tend to overcompensate by adding too much sharpness and contrast, which make images look unnatural, and will often suffer from motion blur with blocky or blurry fast moving scenes. I can safely say that both issues don’t seem to affect this television. Motion blur via Freeview doesn’t appear to be an issue. I did get it using my firestick viewing Thunderbirds in Full HD quality, but switching to 5GHZ Internet on the Firestick, the TV itself doesn't find 5GHZ connections, virtually cleared up the problem. It’s just the congested 2.4 GHZ where I live that causes it. HD quality is stunning, with punchy colours, that don’t look unnaturally over saturated, yet still have a pop to them. Via Freeview motion blur isn’t an issue, watching the football highlights for the purpose of testing the TV was trouble free. The picture was nice and smooth, and pleasant to watch, so it’s great for sports fans. HD quality was excellent. Sharpness is spot on, giving pleasant levels of clear HD detail, which really enhances the viewing experience. HD quality can vary a little from channel to channel, and satellite is equally as good. Both BBC and and ITV channels are outstanding. Contrast is equally as good, and, surprisingly, for an LED TV (not an OLED model) the blacks look black. The opening Philips logo screen does look a little grey when it should be black, but whilst viewing content it’s great. In fact, on HD viewing, there’s little to choose picture wise between this and my Samsung. In Standard definition, the Samsung is noticeably better, particularly in contrast, but it’s not a big difference, and it does depend on signal strength and quality. Some channels look better than others, for example the football in SD was close in quality to the HD feed. This concurs with customer reviews on other review sites praising the excellent picture quality for an entry level Television.

4K UHD content is outstanding. Contrast levels and saturation are exceptional. I used the built in YouTube app to Stream the 4K content, searching for 4K demos, with the sound going through my Panasonic 5.1 surround sound via the optical out connectors. Most showed a HDR icon at start of playback which disappeared after a few seconds. I had no streaming issues, even though my Internet connection at 2.4GHZ was less than the 40 Mbps/sec recommended minimum speed. I tried watching some content from BBC iplayer in both HD and 4K. HD as expected was superb, but 4K just didn’t work. It either showed a black screen (no pixels illuminated), a series of tiny flickering oblongs in Red, Blue and Green, or a picture that flashed on or off, and none of these filled the screen, either a large vertical band taking up the right hand quarter of the screen, or the bottom corner of the panel. I couldn’t get any idea of picture quality, but what little I could make out seemed higher quality than HD. Netflix was an altogether different story. I’ve watched 3 episodes of the Dolby Vision and Atmos 4K documentary “The Ripper”. It is really well filmed and the 4K picture is superb. Sadly the sound was played via optical to my 5.1 surround sound, and whilst the sound did the programme justice, I couldn’t test the Atmos sound.

SD 480p is the weak link in this TV’s armour. The images can look very soft and lacking fine details, but this depends on the channel being viewed and each separate channels Image Quality. The set doesn’t seem to fare better or worse than it’s entry level competitors, with some programmes looking almost as good as it’s HD equivelant. Considering the price it equals, or outperforms it’s price range , on image quality.

So as an all round entry level Television, would I recommend it? It’s extremely well specified, and looks good mounted on the wall. It does everything exceptionally well for it’s price point. And with many connection options to chose from, as well as Dolby Atmos, 4K you wont run out of ideas for what to watch on the box. The main features can be split into two camps, ones that you’ll use, like the Freesat tuner and smart features, and those that future proof the TV, like Dolby Atmos, HDR 10+ (as opossed to HDR 10) and Dolby Vision. It should not need replacing for several years. As for the price, at the RRP of 399.00 it’s a little pricey compared to the equivalent LG and Samsung models. At £349.99 it’s a great buy, and at the price I paid, £319.99, it’s an absolute steal. The only thing missing is Alexa and Google Assistant integration, but for a lot of people without either, it’s not a deal breaker. The 58 series adds this, together with Ambilight, which will appeal to a lot of people for its aesthetics. All in all, a lot of great features come together in a neatly integrated package, and, if you’re looking for a budget TV, this should definitely be towards the top of your list of TV’s for consideration.

UPDATE: JANUARY 2021.

Sadly, the perfect budget TV has turned out not to be perfect after all. The Freeview Play app and it’s associated players aren’t working at all. Trying to play content gives a black screen, with sound. Programmes play without picture. It’s a shame, because the rest of the apps that aren’t linked to the Freeview Play App work perfectly, and I’m getting 66.3 Mbps on Netflix. After two whole nights of trawling the internet, an afternoon on the phone to my ISP plus.net, three factory resets and a several power downs didn’t fix the problem. Even Philips technical support team couldn’t sort the problem. They sent me an email with all the steps to take, whilst I was on the phone to a Dutch agent. Everything in the email had already been tried as I’d already seen the page on the TP Vision website. AO. Com has agreed to take the set back, and give me £40.00 towards another model, so a 49 inch LG is on the way, it’s £110.00 more expensive, but with the 40.00 discount it means I’m only paying £389. 00, £70.00 more than the cost of the Philips. I’m losing an inch in screen size, but that won’t matter much to me. I’m losing HDR 10+ and Dolby Vision and Atmos, but picture quality should be better. I had toyed with the idea that because I loved it so much I could ask for a 4K firestick and keep the Philips, but Mrs. Glover said not to accept that as a faulty TV is a faulty TV. AO would have done that, but I declined in the end. But when all is said and done, I’ll really miss my Philips TV.
 

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Loopthrough

Well-known Member
Philips is still Dutch Philips ‘in a way’, even if the TV/audio division now owned by Taiwan’s TPV (at one time and probably still number one in the world for computer monitors - for a long time).

Most of Philips’s Dutch R&D TV staff moved to TPV, so the TVs contain much of the brand’s long heritage in design/electronics. The European factory is a former Philips one too. The panels in 50” are Chinese, VA type with ties to Sharp’s U2VA technology, also from a state owned Chinese panel maker.

Also, in the CRT and early LCD era (up to early 2000s), Philips were far from an outsider in the UK and Europe. They were market leaders and the biggest tube supplier to nearly all the top brands for decades. Their TVs were the best of the non-Trinitron type tubes.

Hisense is also a well established company outside of the UK and has been making electronics and white goods for about 50 years. It’s only in the last decade that they expanded to the UK, and have frankly achieved record growth.

As early as the early 2000s, if you bought an ‘Argos special’ fridge (eg Fridgemaster, Bush etc), it was invariably really a Hisense. Fridgemaster is now a wholly owned Hisense brand and most Kenwood brand fridges (esp high end models) are Hisense.
 

cleming

Novice Member
Hi Colin and thanks a lot for the review. I recently purchased that tv and as you mentionned HD picture is superb, but I'm having a hard time with 4k HDR content, picture is way to dark. Would you recommend any settings ? (By the way I'm playing content through amazon firestick 4k).
I found settings in the description of this video and I have a noob question :
Is it possible to save one type of settings for sdr and one type of settings for hdr or do we have to change manually everytime depending of what we are watching ?
 
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crashnburn_in

Standard Member
Philips is still Dutch Philips ‘in a way’, even if the TV/audio division now owned by Taiwan’s TPV (at one time and probably still number one in the world for computer monitors - for a long time).

Most of Philips’s Dutch R&D TV staff moved to TPV, so the TVs contain much of the brand’s long heritage in design/electronics. The European factory is a former Philips one too. The panels in 50” are Chinese, VA type with ties to Sharp’s U2VA technology, also from a state owned Chinese panel maker.

Also, in the CRT and early LCD era (up to early 2000s), Philips were far from an outsider in the UK and Europe. They were market leaders and the biggest tube supplier to nearly all the top brands for decades. Their TVs were the best of the non-Trinitron type tubes.

Hisense is also a well established company outside of the UK and has been making electronics and white goods for about 50 years. It’s only in the last decade that they expanded to the UK, and have frankly achieved record growth.

As early as the early 2000s, if you bought an ‘Argos special’ fridge (eg Fridgemaster, Bush etc), it was invariably really a Hisense. Fridgemaster is now a wholly owned Hisense brand and most Kenwood brand fridges (esp high end models) are Hisense.
Interesting insights. M&As all over the place :D
 

mike7

Distinguished Member
Philips is still Dutch Philips ‘in a way’, even if the TV/audio division now owned by Taiwan’s TPV (at one time and probably still number one in the world for computer monitors - for a long time).

Most of Philips’s Dutch R&D TV staff moved to TPV, so the TVs contain much of the brand’s long heritage in design/electronics. The European factory is a former Philips one too. The panels in 50” are Chinese, VA type with ties to Sharp’s U2VA technology, also from a state owned Chinese panel maker.

Also, in the CRT and early LCD era (up to early 2000s), Philips were far from an outsider in the UK and Europe. They were market leaders and the biggest tube supplier to nearly all the top brands for decades. Their TVs were the best of the non-Trinitron type tubes.

Hisense is also a well established company outside of the UK and has been making electronics and white goods for about 50 years. It’s only in the last decade that they expanded to the UK, and have frankly achieved record growth.

As early as the early 2000s, if you bought an ‘Argos special’ fridge (eg Fridgemaster, Bush etc), it was invariably really a Hisense. Fridgemaster is now a wholly owned Hisense brand and most Kenwood brand fridges (esp high end models) are Hisense.
Philips only had a minority stake in this company. They got out of making domestic electronic products themselves some time ago to concentrate on lighting and industrial and medical electronics. Very little is left of the original TV Netherlands based operation. Philips have nothing to do with design and development of TVs any more having handed the responsibility over to TPV which is based in Hong Kong. Their main selling feature remains the Ambilight which no other manufacturer has found it worthwhile to emulate. Whilst they have made some high end models they are not up there with the the likes of Samsung, Sony etc. If you buy a budget Philips that is what it is, made to a price from Chinese parts. I did once work for a division of Philips and lived close to their Eindhoven factory in their glory days.
 

Loopthrough

Well-known Member
Philips only had a minority stake in this company. They got out of making domestic electronic products themselves some time ago to concentrate on lighting and industrial and medical electronics. Very little is left of the original TV Netherlands based operation. Philips have nothing to do with design and development of TVs any more having handed the responsibility over to TPV which is based in Hong Kong. Their main selling feature remains the Ambilight which no other manufacturer has found it worthwhile to emulate. Whilst they have made some high end models they are not up there with the the likes of Samsung, Sony etc. If you buy a budget Philips that is what it is, made to a price from Chinese parts. I did once work for a division of Philips and lived close to their Eindhoven factory in their glory days.
I understand that the main Netherlands team has many of the Philips staff from the era when Philips and TPV had the joint venture which is why they continue to develop Philips like things such as the P5.

TPV is a Taiwanese company with Hong Kong base and strong ties to Chinese panel maker CHOT (not to be confused with TCL’s CSOT!).

I agree Philips is changed from the glory days but unfortunately Philips started messing with the company at the turn of the century with things like the Funai VCRs... and were their entry level TVs or products ever anything special?

Chinese tech doesn’t automatically equal rubbish though. Sony and Samsung have strong ties to Chinese companies now (Sony buys panels from state backed BOE and Samsung has a panel factory tie up with CSOT).
 
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mike7

Distinguished Member
Quite agree Loopthrough. I always try to judge products on their merits rather than where they are made. Your reference to Funai was interesting as I believe the first plasma TVs we saw in the UK were branded Philips but actually made by Funai. They were eye wateringly expensive and, apart from the novelty value of being thin(ish) and flat they were pretty terrible in every respect. They retailed in excess of £10,000! I saw one demonstrated in our local Co-op.
 

Loopthrough

Well-known Member
Quite agree Loopthrough. I always try to judge products on their merits rather than where they are made. Your reference to Funai was interesting as I believe the first plasma TVs we saw in the UK were branded Philips but actually made by Funai. They were eye wateringly expensive and, apart from the novelty value of being thin(ish) and flat they were pretty terrible in every respect. They retailed in excess of £10,000! I saw one demonstrated in our local Co-op.
I wasn’t aware of that. Philips made some excellent Plasma and LCD TVs (themselves) and even won an award similar to an Emmy (I forget what it was) for their picture processing at the time. That DNA is still with them in their picture engines.

Funai is Japanese and as such a good quality company but they make very basic products. They were one of the largest VCR OEMs for decades (Philips and Hitachi’s VCRs, among many other shop own brands, post 2000, were made by them) and latterly they made Toshiba DVD/VHS recorders, Kodak and Dell printers.

At one time in the 90s-00s Philips must have been UK TV market leader. I know many ex service engineers (who weren’t Sony Trinitron fans) always thought Philips to be the best. Their tubes were used in almost every other brand at one stage.

Doesn’t make sense to see Chinese companies like Hisense, TCL, Oppo etc as ‘inferior’. Doesn’t China have more millionaires than anywhere, or second in the world or something? People forget that they want luxury/excellent quality goods and those Chinese brands serve them.

It won’t be long till Chinese cars come to the UK - probably electric and the brand BYD first.
 
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mike7

Distinguished Member
I suppose it's not really our place to criticise other countries for the quality of their televisions when the UK has no home grown production of its own whatsoever. I once worked for one of the few remaining producers which was taken over by Philips and they soon closed it down!

Apart from Chinese made products this Forum, with some justification, comes down heavily in on Turkish Vestel TVs who are actually capable of making good quality stuff for their home market. It's just that a lot of customers worldwide want something cheap and cheerful, so quality suffers as a result. You get what you pay for and most consumers aren't very fussy.

BTW don't knock Sony Trinitrons. I know of some locally that are 50 years old and are still working.

 
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Colin Glover

Active Member
Hi Colin and thanks a lot for the review. I recently purchased that tv and as you mentionned HD picture is superb, but I'm having a hard time with 4k HDR content, picture is way to dark. Would you recommend any settings ? (By the way I'm playing content through amazon firestick 4k).
I found settings in the description of this video and I have a noob question :
Is it possible to save one type of settings for sdr and one type of settings for hdr or do we have to change manually everytime depending of what we are watching ?
What are your 4k settings? Mine wasn't too dark. I find 4K HDR a little dark, so try setting brightness around 65-70%. Also 4K on a 4K Firestick is very dark. Each HDMI input retains it's own settings, so set separately. Doe the Freeview play apps work for you? There's a you tube review with suggested settings in the description. Try and find it and use the settings. Play it and try the settings yourself.
 

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