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My LG 42pc1da tv has no picture only sound

azdream

Standard Member
Last night my My LG 42pc1da tv screen went black and now I just have sound. No picture on any channel. Can any one help me ?? Is it easy to fix or a complete disaster??:lease: help!
 

JayCee

Distinguished Member
It can be fixed but only by a competent person...a Tv repair technician.
Modern sets aren't d-i-y fixable so you'll need to call in the professionals I'm afraid.
 

Boostrail

Distinguished Member
Er just a minute!The OP does not define how he is receiving TV. If he is using a SKy/VMCable/Freesat/Freeview box or their PVR box equivalents. The fault could equally be in the external box or even the cabling.

Set up details OP please?
 

bonzobanana

Well-known Member
It can be fixed but only by a competent person...a Tv repair technician.
Modern sets aren't d-i-y fixable so you'll need to call in the professionals I'm afraid.

Is that really true. AVforums is full of threads of televisions with faults that have been repaired by amateurs. Often as a last resort before throwing out the set. A lot of sets have known issues which can be repaired with only a swop of a resistor or a set of capacitors. At worst many people can swop out a power board or other board. Many service engineers are charging many hundreds of pounds for repairs that cost very little to do. I'm no expert but have repaired a Hitachi 7200 plasma for the princely sum of 52p for a resistor.

I think this model suffers from blown caps in the power board. It may just need the caps replacing or they may have damaged secondary components or maybe other components are at fault.

I think there is a chance of a cheap home repair here if you can use a soldering iron but otherwise a power board replacement may be all that is needed.

Sometimes professional repairs are simply too expensive and some so called professional repairers are extremely amateur. Its quite common for a power board replacement to cost £200 when fitted by a service engineer but if you fit yourself it may only cost a third of that.
 

JayCee

Distinguished Member
Er just a minute!The OP does not define how he is receiving TV. If he is using a SKy/VMCable/Freesat/Freeview box or their PVR box equivalents. The fault could equally be in the external box or even the cabling

It could be and it did occur to me to ask his setup but in the case of a missing input most sets would generate by default a blue screen (unless it's been turned off within the options menu) not a black screen.
 
Last edited:

JayCee

Distinguished Member
Is that really true

Yes, I think it is, in the vast majority of cases.
Don't get me wrong, I'll bend over backwards to help someone (and do) if I get a sense that they are a wee bit technically competent and can be trusted to take a piece of equipment apart and put it together again without electrocuting themselves (or others) or ruining it.
You can often tell from how an OP words their post, describes the symptoms etc if they are competent enough to have a go at fixing it themselves but most of the posters on here and other forums are just looking for a quick fix and just want to be told which button to press to restore their equipment to it's former glory without spending a penny...unfortunately it isn't that easy in a lot of cases.

I know the Hitachi model you refer to and the wire-wound resistors that goes O/C but as you pointed out they can also go O/C due to S/C semis further up the chain.
As far as obtaining/replacing a pcb goes, yes I agree, there are a lot of professional technicians making a killing with their markups on some spares and I despair when I see some of their labour charges but at the same time the prices some manufacturers are charging for spares are way over the top.

Take the case of the infamous tripping caused by blown capacitors on some of the Samsung LCD TVs...yes, quite often the caps can be replaced and that will cure the fault, but in some models/cases the eeprom IC (resident on the main pcb...not the psu pcb) is corrupted by the caps failing, so someone goes out and sources/spends £50-£60 for a psu pcb and fits it only to be greeted by the same tripping noise at switch-on because the eeprom has been damaged by the caps, so they're then looking at spending another £200 odd to replace the main pcb...they've spent £250 and they're no further forward, it would be cheaper to buy a new set.
This is where the knowledge of a (good) experienced professional is invaluable. __________________
 

bonzobanana

Well-known Member
Yes, I think it is, in the vast majority of cases.
Don't get me wrong, I'll bend over backwards to help someone (and do) if I get a sense that they are a wee bit technically competent and can be trusted to take a piece of equipment apart and put it together again without electrocuting themselves (or others) or ruining it.
You can often tell from how an OP words their post, describes the symptoms etc if they are competent enough to have a go at fixing it themselves but most of the posters on here and other forums are just looking for a quick fix and just want to be told which button to press to restore their equipment to it's former glory without spending a penny...unfortunately it isn't that easy in a lot of cases.

I know the Hitachi model you refer to and the wire-wound resistors that goes O/C but as you pointed out they can also go O/C due to S/C semis further up the chain.
As far as obtaining/replacing a pcb goes, yes I agree, there are a lot of professional technicians making a killing with their markups on some spares and I despair when I see some of their labour charges but at the same time the prices some manufacturers are charging for spares are way over the top.

Take the case of the infamous tripping caused by blown capacitors on some of the Samsung LCD TVs...yes, quite often the caps can be replaced and that will cure the fault, but in some models/cases the eeprom IC (resident on the main pcb...not the psu pcb) is corrupted by the caps failing, so someone goes out and sources/spends £50-£60 for a psu pcb and fits it only to be greeted by the same tripping noise at switch-on because the eeprom has been damaged by the caps, so they're then looking at spending another £200 odd to replace the main pcb...they've spent £250 and they're no further forward, it would be cheaper to buy a new set.
This is where the knowledge of a (good) experienced professional is invaluable. __________________

I wish experienced professionals were invaluable i.e. of immense value because in my experience value and service engineers are poles apart. I understand where your coming from though.
 

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