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My dedicated cinema room construction thread

CraigyMcfly

Novice Member
This is a great project and the style is exactly what I had in mind for mine.

Unfortunately my budget is a little tight as we have a new addition to our family so all my time and money is now dedicated to my lovely little daughter for the time being.

From the dimensions posted, we're they before the false wall was added for the screen? I only ask as I have a room roughly 12 x 12 feet and wondered if it will be large enough for a screen of your size
......
 

Philw101

Well-known Member
Hi Neil,

Superb setup if you don't mind me saying! :)

I especially like your fibre optic lights in the ceiling, do you have any more pics of these both in the day and night? How does it look in the day with them installed?

What are you next plans with the system? Or are you happy for the moment.
 

Neil in Bristol

Novice Member
From the dimensions posted, we're they before the false wall was added for the screen? I only ask as I have a room roughly 12 x 12 feet and wondered if it will be large enough for a screen of your size
......
The finished room is now 10'2" x 14', and the screen is 9' wide (on the 10'2" wall). It actually looks bigger in real life than it does on the final photo.

If your seating is 12 feet away, you should be okay with a screen that size, but I'd test it first to see how you get on with it. You might prefer it a little smaller.

Another consideration is getting a projector with a suitably short throw distance. The back of mine needs to be around 13'6" away from the screen to project an image that size.
 

Neil in Bristol

Novice Member
Hi Neil,

Superb setup if you don't mind me saying! :)

I especially like your fibre optic lights in the ceiling, do you have any more pics of these both in the day and night? How does it look in the day with them installed?

What are you next plans with the system? Or are you happy for the moment.
Thanks!

The fibre optics are nearly invisible in the day. They looks like small specks of dust. You certainly wouldn't be able to see them on a photo.

The fact that the ceiling is covered in fabric definitely helps. It might be harder to drill holes in plasterboard neatly enough for them to be invisible, but I guess you could always do some careful painting before you cut the fibre-optics flush with the ceiling.

We're going to spend our free time for the next few weeks catching up on all the films that have been released over the last year. Until the "premiere" last week, we hadn't seen a film since we moved house, 14 months ago!

After that, I need to find a more permanent home for the projector as it's currently sitting on a temporary stand behind the sofa.

My original plan was to make a box for the projector and mount it in the eaves behind the rear wall. I've abandoned that plan for now, in part due to concerns that it will overheat. I've read some worrying reports on AVS forum about lamps failing very prematurely when people have positioned this model (Epson TW3600 / 8100) in a bookcase, as the air inlet is at the back, so a box could be even worse.

I'll probably just install a shelf for now, or perhaps find a ceiling mount that will work on a 55 degree sloping ceiling.

I also want to make a cover for the radiator. It's not nearly as distracting as I thought it might be, but it will definitely look neater.

Equipment-wise, I've run out of money to buy anything else for the moment, but I'm keeping an eye out for a reasonably-priced anamorphic lens, such as an Isco II.
 

CraigyMcfly

Novice Member
Neil in Bristol said:
The finished room is now 10'2" x 14', and the screen is 9' wide (on the 10'2" wall). It actually looks bigger in real life than it does on the final photo.

If your seating is 12 feet away, you should be okay with a screen that size, but I'd test it first to see how you get on with it. You might prefer it a little smaller.

Another consideration is getting a projector with a suitably short throw distance. The back of mine needs to be around 13'6" away from the screen to project an image that size.
Thanks for that Neil

The room is still a shell with various bits of junk from he house slowly piling up but I think I'll end up drawing a screen on the wall to see how seating will cope.
 

Digimons

Novice Member
What a fantastic install, what do you think of the Wharfedale DX1 HCP Speaker package you have used?
 

Neil in Bristol

Novice Member
What a fantastic install, what do you think of the Wharfedale DX1 HCP Speaker package you have used?
I don't really have anything to compare it with, other than my old stereo 'bookshelf' speakers, I'm afraid.

I notice that I do have to turn the amplifier up quite high (level 70) to get a decent volume. Not sure if that's normal, but it has been suggested that the Wharfedales take a lot of power to drive them as they're 4 ohms.

The sound quality has varied a lot depending on the source. Only watched a couple of films so far. Sound quality in Star Wars was disappointing, I thought. Much better in Source Code. The musical soundtrack on trailers etc is very good indeed, so I think it bodes well.
 

s1mon

Standard Member
congrats on brill install.... my only comment/ question do you get any light bouncy / reflection on your door on the right ? or is it painted matt?
 

Neil in Bristol

Novice Member
congrats on brill install.... my only comment/ question do you get any light bouncy / reflection on your door on the right ? or is it painted matt?
Thanks :)

The door is painted with satinwood paint. It doesn't really seem to reflect any more light than the grey matt walls do. The photo makes it look worse than it is due to the long exposure.

Using black material for the first metre or so of walls would be ideal for optimum picture quality, but I think it would make the room less appealing when the lights are on.
 

Crabbie

Active Member
Hi

Gotta say this room looks fantasticthe star ceiling looks great can you tell me what sort of cost was it for the complete lighting kit and where did u get it from

Thanks

Crabbie
 

mckee74

Well-known Member
Another fan of the star kit here. Do you have any pictures of your install of that at all please?

Room just looks incredible. Well done.
 

floyde

Standard Member
Fantastic install. Have you got a sketch of how you fixed your cove lighting shelf around perimter of ceiling. Also did you use MDF or is it Plasterboard with holes for Halogens cut out once secured?
 

Neil in Bristol

Novice Member
Fantastic install. Have you got a sketch of how you fixed your cove lighting shelf around perimter of ceiling. Also did you use MDF or is it Plasterboard with holes for Halogens cut out once secured?
Finally where did you get your rope lighting from is connected to a dimmer?
Hi Floyd. Posts #11 and #15 on this thread should have the info you need!

The only pics I have of the lighting shelf under construction are on there, too.
 

Laudrup1

Active Member
Hey Neil. Excellent thread. I love the star lights.

Do you have any more pics of the installation of that at all?

I'm keen to see how you fixed it to the ceiling. We've got a little one on the way in November and I've been thinking about star lights for the ceiling in the nursery.
 

Neil in Bristol

Novice Member
Hey Neil. Excellent thread. I love the star lights.

Do you have any more pics of the installation of that at all?

I'm keen to see how you fixed it to the ceiling. We've got a little one on the way in November and I've been thinking about star lights for the ceiling in the nursery.
I don't have any more pics of the actual installation, as it was difficult to photograph, but here's a summary:

1) Screwed 6 pieces of timber to the back of a piece of Foamalux. One along each edge to make a rectangle and two across the middle. Timber had a cross section of about 3cm x 3cm.

2) Turned the whole thing over and glued some fabric onto the front of the Foamalux, leaving a couple of inches fabric unglued around the edges.

3) Measured the positions of the ceiling joists and pre-drilled some holes through the Foamalux and timber frame. (This is why the fabric was left unglued at the edges!) I also put a couple of holes through the cross pieces for good measure. These two obviously had to go through fabric as well.

4) Next job was to install the fibre optics. There's some pictures in the thread of the work in progress. Not a difficult job, but very boring! You need to prop the whole thing up on its end and have one person either side. Leave the fibres sticking out about an inch for trimming later.

5) Attached the Foamalux onto the ceiling using long screws then glued the remaining couple of inches of fabric down to cover the screws.

That said, if you have easy access to the loft, consider installing the fibres directly into the ceiling. If you drill carefully, and perhaps put a thin coat of paint on the ceiling after installation, but before you trim the fibres, they should be invisible when they're switched off.

The kit I got was good, but might be too bright for a baby looking directly at it. Consider getting a dimmable one, perhaps?
 

Laudrup1

Active Member
Thanks very much for that. It was steps 3 and 5 that I'd been wondering about. I do have an attic space above the room but it's in the eves of the loft so isn't perfect for access. I reckon I'd be best following your plan too.

I'd wondered about supporting the middle of the structure but guess just using a black tipped screw head solves the problem. I wasn't sure if it'd be obvious they were there and would spoil the look.

I wasn't sure if the controller that came with the model you bought was dimmable. I'll have to look in to that too.

It'd be nice to have an ambiance in the room so I'll maybe put a seperate switch on the wall for a couple of wall lights so either option can be used.

Thanks again.
 

Neil in Bristol

Novice Member
I'd wondered about supporting the middle of the structure but guess just using a black tipped screw head solves the problem. I wasn't sure if it'd be obvious they were there and would spoil the look.

I wasn't sure if the controller that came with the model you bought was dimmable. I'll have to look in to that too.

Thanks again.
My wife stuck a couple of pieces of black fabric over the two screw holes in the middle, and I honestly struggled to find them!

I would have preferred a dimmable light source, but they tended to be a lot bigger to cope with the heat and I wanted to hide the light source in the box section where the downlighters are.

The stars are very bright - too bright to leave on when we're watching a film, but I wasn't really intending to do that anyway.
 

Laudrup1

Active Member
From a brief look on their website, there seems to be a dimmable option. I'll drop them a line about it.

I take it there's no way to wire it in to a lightswitch on the wall that you put a dimmer on? I see a connection in your picture on page1 that looks like it plugs in to their controller.
 

Elguapo

Active Member
I honestly think this is a great project, and stunning when you consider how cheap you've done it for. Amazes me that other threads where an installer was paid and did everything gets more coverage and praise than something like this, which is ambitious, quality, and really importantly...was done by you



Looking forward to seeing the finished product

just to add to this, the work looks fantastic and even more so due to the true DIY skills!
 

DrH

Active Member
Been away from the forum for a while, i was watching your progress with great interest.

I am soon to redo my room and your build is quite an inspiration. My room used to be the garage so is a bit smaller.

I do like your lighting especially the star ceiling.

Great work

DrH
 

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