My best TVs for next gen gaming 2020-21

Dodgexander

Moderator
For sure an oled is only for viewing streaming media (no logo) or gaming (but not all games), not more I think.
I thought sports could also because repetitions or half parts, the result board is gone. But the green of the stadium of nfl for example is something to think of it in an oled.

Besides these uses (streaming or gaming selected, dont know if sport), there is not so clever use for an oled, tvs channels with their logos mess up.

I compared in a retailer a lcd vs oled from philips, and in the oled it was another better quality, like it almost pop ups and more bright, the image was a car, and the car was brightened in the oled, not so much in the lcd on the contrary.




So, even it is some windows 100% brightness, it is safe, but it is a big difference if I set 85% instead of 100%, so much difference?
Philips LCD TVs do not compare well against other higher end LCD TVs, let alone OLEDs. You'd need to consider one of the LCD TVs in the high tier section of the guide instead.
You can set the brightness lower if you like, but as I said you'll be clipping HDR highlights.

I think you should think about if you'll use content that is risky on the TV first, and take your decision from there. You mustn't think you can avoid burn in by running HDR with a lower peak brightness otherwise you are losing picture quality.
 

Jotatvsmonitors

Active Member
Philips LCD TVs do not compare well against other higher end LCD TVs, let alone OLEDs. You'd need to consider one of the LCD TVs in the high tier section of the guide instead.
You can set the brightness lower if you like, but as I said you'll be clipping HDR highlights.

I think you should think about if you'll use content that is risky on the TV first, and take your decision from there. You mustn't think you can avoid burn in by running HDR with a lower peak brightness otherwise you are losing picture quality.


Yes I know about using well (streaming and gaming (less those specific games)) an oled rather than own one and not knowing how to use it (watch news, channels with logos, maybe sports).
Just wanting to know if I can avoid 100% full brightness, not knowing that only happens in small window, the oled itself because ABL does not allow it in full screen, but that I did not know, how hdr works.
Some people is saying to have a brighter oled, I dont watch in blackened room, but rather ambient cold light, gonna change it to warm (yellow) light.
I dont watch in a blackened because in front of you all of a sudden is an ''explosion'' of nits, and that is bad.

I was just asking now about oled and hdr things because I was gonna buy xh90, but after the rumour of not having the update, changed to best oled (as q90t is expensive and maybe more than cx, and worse than cx), that is why now I ask a lot about oled and hdr all of a sudden.
Maybe xh90 is updated eventually when ps5 gets vrr too, but now I'm searching about cx, can not find c9, and b9 is not so good compared to cx.

Thanks for the information (y)
 
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Dodgexander

Moderator
If you reduce the brightness you reduce every part of the screen. The highlights of HDR get dimmer, the blacks get dimmer and you will get worse picture quality. You may be able to get around this by using LGs Dynamic Tone Mapping, but picture quality will be worse. You can do it, but its not recommended.

The Sony XH9005 is an LCD TV, so different rules apply. It may get as bright, or brighter in some respects compared to an OLED, but its not good HDR TV because it cannot display darker detail as well. A good baseline for an LCD TV is the high tier section of the guide, too many compromises are made compared to mid tier.

With an OLED, for SDR you can lower the brightness as much as you want and it won't affect the picture quality. Typically pro calibrators run TVs at around 130nits, which is not going to stress the TV at all. If you do want to buy an OLED and run risky content on it, then lowering the brightness is your best bet, but you mustn't do it in HDR mode as it will create problems.
I dont watch in a blackened because in front of you all of a sudden is an ''explosion'' of nits, and that is bad.
The explosion of nits is mostly what HDR is about, there's no TV now that will blind you, even models in the guide like the Hisense U8Q, Samsung Q90T or Sony XH9505 that can get very bright. An OLED will be fine at 100% brightness for HDR and you should always keep it that way. No different to on an LCD TV.

Can you even buy the B9 and C9? You should check if you can before comparing. They are 2019 models and should be sold out now. Only go for one of those if you can find it at a big discount compared to the BX or CX.
 

Jotatvsmonitors

Active Member
If you reduce the brightness you reduce every part of the screen. The highlights of HDR get dimmer, the blacks get dimmer and you will get worse picture quality. You may be able to get around this by using LGs Dynamic Tone Mapping, but picture quality will be worse. You can do it, but its not recommended.

The Sony XH9005 is an LCD TV, so different rules apply. It may get as bright, or brighter in some respects compared to an OLED, but its not good HDR TV because it cannot display darker detail as well. A good baseline for an LCD TV is the high tier section of the guide, too many compromises are made compared to mid tier.

With an OLED, for SDR you can lower the brightness as much as you want and it won't affect the picture quality. Typically pro calibrators run TVs at around 130nits, which is not going to stress the TV at all. If you do want to buy an OLED and run risky content on it, then lowering the brightness is your best bet, but you mustn't do it in HDR mode as it will create problems.

The explosion of nits is mostly what HDR is about, there's no TV now that will blind you, even models in the guide like the Hisense U8Q, Samsung Q90T or Sony XH9505 that can get very bright. An OLED will be fine at 100% brightness for HDR and you should always keep it that way. No different to on an LCD TV.

Can you even buy the B9 and C9? You should check if you can before comparing. They are 2019 models and should be sold out now. Only go for one of those if you can find it at a big discount compared to the BX or CX.


I can buy: CX 55' for 1200$ (specific retailer)
B9 55' for 1099$ (this same specific retailer)
C9 55' 1459$ (yes, more expensive than cx, because this one is a different retailer)
BX 1200$ (same as cx, so, cx)

CX without thinking it, not bad price, and still gets lower likely.

Now Im searching for configurations and asking about those vrr flickering some people are having.
VRR has two functions: reduce lag/stutter when fps drops below 120fps (or 60fps for 60fps games), and matching 120hz to 60fps, that 60 gap.

But there are people saying that when vrr is on, it makes flickering in some games, does it have something to do with the tvs? Or rather developers of that games that makes flick when vrr is on? Or both? Or yes it is cause cx's vrr?

I have almost all information about oled, hdr and sdr.

It is funny, XH90 can get even brighter, and Im already asking to not have a blast of nits in a 55' front of me lol. Gonna shop a warm light bulb that makes less lightened the room but not all darkened, someone once said that projectors are used because of it, to have darkened room, but oled is better
 
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Dodgexander

Moderator
There's a known issue with VRR on every TV, not just LG. It can make the screen flicker because gamma is not tracked the same at different frame rate. Hard to know without trying it if you'll notice the problem or not though. No way around it, other than to run a game at a static frame rate which many games you'll have to do anyway if they don't support VRR. Its just a setting you can turn on and off on the console.

If you are a PS5 gamer, its not even used, and may never be.

From those prices clearly the CX is the better buy.
 

Jotatvsmonitors

Active Member
There's a known issue with VRR on every TV, not just LG. It can make the screen flicker because gamma is not tracked the same at different frame rate. Hard to know without trying it if you'll notice the problem or not though. No way around it, other than to run a game at a static frame rate which many games you'll have to do anyway if they don't support VRR. Its just a setting you can turn on and off on the console.

If you are a PS5 gamer, its not even used, and may never be.

From those prices clearly the CX is the better buy.

This thing of vrr if it is not solved, via developers of the games, or developers of the tvs, then: Cap the fps, or better have 120fps with drops?
Not asking really, just wanna put this comment for readers to be helped, as once someone said: ''when vrr gives me the flickering, in those few few games (5%, the 95% is not a problem) it makes the flick with vrr, I turn it off, because it is better seeing a drop than the flickering''
(Dont know if it is true about the 5%

What I said in a forum is that maybe the tvs developers have nothing to do about it, but the game developers? What if the vrr is bad in the series X or pc, and not in the tv?

Anyway the via vrr is solved in those few games, gonna purchase cx and see what update is the most convenient, thre is a new one that made better dolby vision, but made 100 nits darker hdr game mode, so when I purchase the cx, I have to know what update is the best, likely I will turn off the ''automatic update''


As always so informating (y)
 

Jotatvsmonitors

Active Member
Hard to say if it will be solved or not, its a hard problem to fix. May not be fixed at all and will only work without issue on newer 2021 models. Time will tell.

Thing is what prices they would have, 42' one may be affordable rather than CX, but no release date of 42' one and the rest of the oled series 2021. I should see in April how is going on rather than to buy now CX, (although I still think that by software VRR in CX and in rest of tvs can be solved, in both tvs, console or pc)

Can you say something about this topic?: The best ambient light is warm (yellow) one for watching tv with ambient light. Thing is, I have a cold one light from above and directed to the wall behind the tv (casue if not, directed to my from above and it bothers, that is why directe in front to reach the wall behind tv)
And people may say ''do not direct the bulb to the tv or near it'', but there is no reflection, maybe is so directed up than to the tv.

I ask this because, I read that blue light, makes the temperature bigger, not close for example weather light, it is artifical whatsoever.
But is it not the best for watching tv warm (yellow) light? Low Kelvin?

I have read also about bias, but I think it is not well iluminated the room?
 
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Dodgexander

Moderator
I wouldn't worry about bias lighting until after you have bought the TV. That is, unless you go for a Philips model that includes a static bias feature as part of Ambilight. They have no gaming features though like LGs.

Typically bias lighting is best around 6500 kelvin which is the d65 white point pro calibrators also calibrate white level too on TVs.

Ambient lighting is best avoided completely when using a TV, especially with HDR. If you are going to always have lighting on in the room and you don't want it to be dark, or you don't want to use bias lighting. Get an LCD TV like the Samsung Q80T/Q90T instead.
 

Jotatvsmonitors

Active Member
I wouldn't worry about bias lighting until after you have bought the TV. That is, unless you go for a Philips model that includes a static bias feature as part of Ambilight. They have no gaming features though like LGs.

Typically bias lighting is best around 6500 kelvin which is the d65 white point pro calibrators also calibrate white level too on TVs.

Ambient lighting is best avoided completely when using a TV, especially with HDR. If you are going to always have lighting on in the room and you don't want it to be dark, or you don't want to use bias lighting. Get an LCD TV like the Samsung Q80T/Q90T instead.

''or you don't want to use bias lighting''

So, it seems in order to have full quality while light on, is to use a behind tv light, such as bias or a bulb behind it. (I mean, you wrote ''or dont want to use bias'', like, you are supporting then bias)
 

Jotatvsmonitors

Active Member
bias lighting is fine, overhead lighting or light around the room is just going to cause reflections and be distracting. It will raise the black level and you will get reduced picture quality.

Thanks for the information (y)

6500K is a cold bright one, I dont think something bad happens if it is a bit lower than 6500K on the contrary?
 
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Jotatvsmonitors

Active Member
Also, wanna post this for readers and for the forum, it is about VRR:

VRR is a technology in tvs and monitors, consoles and pcs ''connect'' to it, but, consoles and pc has nothing to do with those flickering in those few cases there is flickering, as the technology VRR, is from the tvs and monitors.

Updates may keep incoming, CX is the best and most powerful tv for gaming right now it seems, processor is better
 
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Jotatvsmonitors

Active Member
There is a new youtube video from hdtv channel Vincent, saying that sony responded him about XH90 update regarding VRR and ALLM, that yes, it is scheduled XH90 to have an update to have VRR and ALLM:


 

Petey20

Active Member
Hi Dodge, was hoping to get your opinion on the upcoming Samsung QN90A mini leds thats arriving later this year.. do you think these will be much of an improvement over the current Q90T and worth the wait?

Having now returned 2 Sony XH95s for DSE, I'm a bit unsure what to do now.

I've looked in to OLEDs despite being worried about burn in, and was a bit shocked to learn these also all suffer with banding? (Vertical and Horizontal lines) which to me is worse than DSE, so not really sure OLED is an option for me.

Originally my plan was to get the Samsung 90T but I've seen so many complaints about screen uniformity with these as well so not sure i want to go that route.

As you can probably tell, I'm bit all over the place with what to do next lol.
I'm pushing towards trying another XH95 as the owners thread on here is so positive regarding screen uniformity, but also cant help but think will a 3rd one really be that much better.
Any advice would be much appreciated.
 

Ste7en

Distinguished Member
My son is still pondering which TV to go for (or even a monitor). He will be getting the Series X (just waiting for stock). But he really needs a better TeeVee (currently using a 32" HD Ready set, set to 720p).

He would like 120Hz, UHD etc. around 32".

Does such a thing even exist?
 
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shoestring25

Distinguished Member
Hi Dodge, was hoping to get your opinion on the upcoming Samsung QN90A mini leds thats arriving later this year.. do you think these will be much of an improvement over the current Q90T and worth the wait?

Having now returned 2 Sony XH95s for DSE, I'm a bit unsure what to do now.

I've looked in to OLEDs despite being worried about burn in, and was a bit shocked to learn these also all suffer with banding? (Vertical and Horizontal lines) which to me is worse than DSE, so not really sure OLED is an option for me.

Originally my plan was to get the Samsung 90T but I've seen so many complaints about screen uniformity with these as well so not sure i want to go that route.

As you can probably tell, I'm bit all over the place with what to do next lol.
I'm pushing towards trying another XH95 as the owners thread on here is so positive regarding screen uniformity, but also cant help but think will a 3rd one really be that much better.
Any advice would be much appreciated.
not all OLEDS suffer from banding mine doesnt and looks fine to even notice anything you have to put on a 5% greyscale and 35 oled light which isnt at all what i would watch it at

Sonys have better screen uniformity than samsungs do so if your unhappy with the ones you received so far i doubt you will be happy with a 3rd
 

Dodgexander

Moderator
Hi Dodge, was hoping to get your opinion on the upcoming Samsung QN90A mini leds thats arriving later this year.. do you think these will be much of an improvement over the current Q90T and worth the wait?
We won't know until reviews surface, could be an improvement, could be a regression. Mini LED means precious little, what will count is how many zones the TV's have, and how well the local dimming works.

Banding is a misused term to describe bad screen uniformity, or vertical lines that are visible usually with uniform backgrounds. Its distracting, but an OLED is going to be far better than any LCD TV in this department because there's no zones behind the TV to notice and there's no lights either which can make one part of the screen dimmer than the next.

That doesn't mean that its also not possible to get an OLED that has poor screen uniformity, just your chances are a lot less.

Sonys have better screen uniformity than samsungs do so if your unhappy with the ones you received so far i doubt you will be happy with a 3rd
No they don't. Typically Samsung models have better uniformity due to over-aggressive local dimming. Sony TVs favour picture accuracy instead, and are prone more to blooming. What Samsung models may be more prone too is noticing the local dimming or the zones behind the TV which can often be mistaken for bad screen uniformity. The problem with the XH9505 is despite it being their top end smaller TV it doesn't carry the same amount of zones as TVs did previously like the ZD9 and therefore it still suffers quite a bit with uniformity.

Less zones costs less, and they can't fit too many zones to TVs any more because it at that point it costs more money to produce a FALD TV than an OLED and it won't sell.
My son is still pondering which TV to go for (or even a monitor). He will be getting the Series X (just waiting for stock). But he really needs a better TeeVee (currently using a 32" HD Ready set, set to 720p).

He would like 120Hz, UHD etc. around 32".

Does such a thing even exist?
Sorry no, you are probably best getting a cheap 32" TV, keeping what you have or going for a 144hz monitor with VRR support. HDR is basically a no-go on computer monitors. Even the ones considered to have the best HDR are poor...and with TVs you can't go smaller than 48" and get a good HDR model. Part of what next gen gaming is about is HDR, but you can still play with that disabled and take advantage of a computer monitor with VRR technology (if the game supports it).
 

Petey20

Active Member
We won't know until reviews surface, could be an improvement, could be a regression
That doesn't mean that its also not possible to get an OLED that has poor screen uniformity, just your chances are a lot less.
Cheers Dodge. Decided im not gonna bother waiting for the 2021 models.

Not sure if you remember but I had thrips get inside my previous LCD, so I was favouring towards OLED until I read about lots of people complaining about their screen uniformity.
With them fears put aside, would you say the CX is worth £500 more than the XH95?

I can get a 55XH95 for £925 where as the CX is £1300 and id also require the burn in warranty at an extra £140 to keep my sanity lol.
 

Petey20

Active Member
not all OLEDS suffer from banding mine doesnt and looks fine to even notice anything you have to put on a 5% greyscale and 35 oled light which isnt at all what i would watch it at

Sonys have better screen uniformity than samsungs do so if your unhappy with the ones you received so far i doubt you will be happy with a 3rd
Hi mate, what OLED do you have out of interest?
 

BigTelHols

Well-known Member
Cheers @Dodgexander! as helpful as ever :)

I think my Son has decided on an ASUS 27" gaming monitor.
I've got a BENQ EX2780Q, 27" 1440p monitor. Works at 1440p @120hz with VRR with my Series X. Also 4K @ 60hz with my PS5. Tell your Son to check on YouTube for people confirming the Asus works okay with new consoles.
 

capt_janeway

Active Member
Wrong place
 
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BigTelHols

Well-known Member
Will do, thanks for the tip!
No problem, if he watches a few videos he'll get an idea of what monitors actually work with the console, it's a monitor firmware issue and vesa standards whether the monitor and console are compatible (IE does the monitor have the correct timings. When I was researching monitors the Dell S3220DGF had to be revision 4 or higher as it's firmware had been updated). If he only wants 1440p @ 120hz he only needs HDMI 2.0, that's what my monitor is and it works fine with Series X.
 

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