My best TVs for next gen gaming 2020-21

Dodgexander

Moderator
My best TVs for next gen gaming 2020-21
Hi, my names Dodgexander and I am a forum moderator here on AVForums.
Since 2016 each year I have released guides to help people when searching for there perfect TV. Together with a lot of other helpful users here on the forum, I try to help people not get caught in the endless loop of shopping for a TV.

To be clear to anyone reading. Like many of you, I am not a TV reviewer, and I do not own each and every TV I mention in my guides. The guide is strictly compiled information based on real specs, reviews and user feedback and is designed to make TV recommendations more easy for those unfamiliar when shopping for TVs.

I hope you enjoy the guide!

Here's a link to all my guides:
My links & guides

And I stress, before posting; please do your best to take the time to read and search the forum, both through my guides, and through other posts. The search button can be found in the top right of the forum. In most cases, the answer to your question will already be there if you are able to search for it. Most TV recommendations are the same.
Gaming with one of the new Xbox Series X, Xbox Series C, Playstation 5 or Nvidia RTX 3xxx series Graphics card.
Two factors are crucial.
  • HDR picture quality - Every TV can accept a HDR signal, but very few have the ability to display HDR without problems, for next gen gaming more and more games are going to include HDR, and to display HDR problem free, and impressively, you need a TV that meets these minimum specifications. In this guide, only high tier models are suited to proper HDR use, whilst mid tier will give you an okay experience in some games, but not others. Low tier TVs are not suited for HDR use at all and in most cases you'll want to use these with HDR disabled.​
  • HDMI 2.1 VRR with a 40-120hz range - Many games may not reach 120fps, but having variable refresh rate technology is one of the main selling points of next gen gaming. Some Samsung TVs support VRR despite not properly having HDMI 2.1 ports. These models are best avoided as they support only a limited 48-60fps range because they do not have 120hz panels. Using a 60hz panelled TV to game means more motion blur, and its more likely a game will drop beneath 48fps threshold rather than 40fps disabling VRR. Do not worry though, these models are only beneath 55" and there's mention of them in my guide.​
The output signal and the internal frame rate of the game are different things. The frame rate does not have to equal the output signal for there to be a benefit.
Part of the new HDMI 2.1 spec includes HDMI VRR technology, that allows a compatible TV to match the the fps of the game.
The next gen gaming platforms are more powerful and will be able to utilise better graphics at a higher frame rate than last gen. If the game already comes with adaptive frame rate such as Assassins Creed: Origins that we already saw last gen, you'll get slowdowns and tearing with a non HDMI 2.1 VRR TV. Additionally, TVs that come without true HDMI 2.1 ports cannot support an input signal higher than 60hz at UHD resolution, and will present the game with more motion blur. Not only do these 60hz TVs have more blur, but if they support VRR, they also drop the signal sooner at 48fps instead of 40fps.
Dolby Vision and Atmos are supported only on PC and Xbox platforms. Xbox promise games in Dolby Vision and Atmos in 2021.

Dolby Vision HDR - This is a nice to have for the future if you are a PC or Xbox gamer, but its not essential. All Dolby Vision games will still work on non-supported Dolby Vision TVs using standard HDR10 data. It is much more preferable to have a TV that is good displaying HDR like the Samsung Q90T that doesn't support Dolby Vision, than it is to have a TV that is bad with HDR like the LG Nano80/85 but does have Dolby Vision.

Dolby Atmos Sound - Apart from select high end OLED TVs with Atmos soundbars, its only important the TV supports Dolby Atmos if you intend to:
  • Pair the TV with an Atmos soundbar without a HDMI input, for example the Sonos ARC.​
  • Pair the TV with an AV Receiver that isn't eARC compliant.​
  • For some reason you want to plug the console direct to the TV, instead of your soundbar or AVR.​
Not any more, all TVs have low enough input lag for gaming
Motion Blur - If you play fast paced games, and you want as little blur as possible.
Viewing angles - If you view the TV off-axis, or you like to play a locally with mates.
Smaller TVs don't carry the same features as larger TVs. This means smaller TVs don't come with HDMI 2.1 VRR and also aren't suitable for HDR use. Smaller TVs also lack higher speed panels and have worse motion blur. They also lack viewing angle/anti glare filters of larger TVs.
Sadly this is the harsh truth of next gen gaming. To get the very latest features you have to pay more money. Don't panic though, if you have a limited budget then you can still use a TV without HDR enabled and without HDMI 2.1 VRR. It will work, but won't be as impressive.
Because its not recommended for next gen gaming.
High Tier means the TV will be the best for next gen gaming. Medium means it will be a small improvement over what most people are using. Low means for many people its negligible whether to replace your current TV
No because you will pay as much as 20-50% more if you don't wait. See: The best time to buy a TV
No, on release features often do not work properly and if you buy a TV beforehand, you won't be able to return it if it doesn't work correctly when you test it.
Yes and no, my best buy guides are general guides for mixed usage and any recommended TV in the guide will also be recommended for gaming. However this list takes only the very best TVs of each category for gaming and places that top priority.
All these TVs are more than suitable, if you are interested in TVs that focus more on video than gaming, then wait until Black Friday for my general best buy guide
OLED is a new display technology. QLED is a marketing term for LCD TVs. LED is an incorrect term used to describe LCD TVs.
See this post:
I'll include it in the guide once we know whether it will work correctly or not with the new console and HDMI 2.1 features. So far we don't know as it uses an older video chipset

High tier:
These models check the most boxes for HDR games and are highly recommended.


LG CX, GX, ZX, RX OLEDs
Size Range: 48-88"
Sizes recommended: All

Pros:
  • Perfect viewing angles
  • No motion blur
  • Only TVs that support all next gen gaming features including Dolby Vision
  • The best choice for dark room gaming
  • 4x HDMI 2.1 ports.

Cons:
  • If you play a game with lots of static images such a FIFA or Football Manager often, risk of OLED Burn In Risk
  • If you intend to game a lot in very bright conditions, you may find with HDR these aren't bright enough


Samsung Q80T, Q85T, Q90T, Q95T, Q800T, Q900T, Q950T
Size Range: 49-85"
Size recommended: 55" and up only.

Notes: Don't be fooled into thinking every 8k model is better than 4k. The performance of the Q800T and Q85T are broadly the same, whilst the Q900/Q950T performs better than the Q90T/Q95T. Smaller models aren't recommended since they come with slower panels, a limited VRR range of 48-60fps and lack any wide viewing angle/anti glare filters.

Pros:
  • Q85T and up have improved viewing angles and better anti glare compared to standard LCD TVs
  • No risk of burn in
  • Bright, so useful for gaming during the day
  • Motion settings available in game mode
  • Dolby Atmos
  • Great picture accuracy out of the box

Cons:
  • More motion blur than OLEDs.
  • HDR mode causes TVs to be less accurate
  • No Dolby Vision
  • Only 1x HDMI 2.1 port and 3x HDMI 2.0 ports
  • Q80T has poor viewing angles
  • In dark viewing screen uniformity can be an issue, especially on lower tier models
  • 8k TVs are expensive

Hisense U8Q
Size Range: 55-65"
Size Recommended: All

Pros:
  • No risk of burn in
  • Bright, so useful for gaming during the day

Cons:
  • More motion blur than OLEDs, but less than most LCD TVs.
  • Only 4x HDMI 2.0 ports
  • Poor viewing angles
  • No Dolby Atmos

Sony XH9505
Size Range: 49-85"
Size Recommended: All

Notes: 49" model lacks good viewing angles

Pros:
  • 55" and up have improved viewing angles and better anti glare compared to standard LCD TVs
  • No risk of burn in
  • Bright, so useful for gaming during the day
  • Picture accuracy out of the box is good
  • Dolby Vision
  • Dolby Atmos

Cons:
  • More motion blur than OLEDs, but less than most LCD TVs.
  • Only 4x HDMI 2.0 ports
  • 49" TV has poor viewing angles

Medium Tier:
These models don't really make cut, but with a limited budget you can get halfway there. In many titles HDR will be best disabled.


Sony XH9005
Size range: 55-85"
Size Recommended: All

Pros:
  • No risk of burn in
  • Picture accuracy out of the box is good
  • Dolby Vision
  • Dolby Atmos

Cons:
  • More motion blur than OLEDs, but less than most LCD TVs
  • Poor viewing angles
  • Limited peak brightness makes the TV questionable for HDR use

Hisense U7Q
Size Range: 50-65"
Size Recommended: All

Pros:
  • No risk of burn in
  • Dolby Vision

Cons:
  • Motion blur will only be average
  • Poor viewing angles
  • Limited peak brightness makes the TV questionable for HDR use.
  • No Dolby Atmos

Low tier:
These models really aren't suitable for next gen gaming, but they will work okay provided you use these TVs without HDR enabled. They are better gaming TVs than most older TVs, but many people (especially those with TVs from 2013 or later) will find little to no gain changing to them at all. I'd suggest saving up for higher tier models.


Hisense AE7400 & A7500 and above
Size Range: 43-65
Size Recommended: All

Pros:
  • Available at small sizes
  • No risk of burn in
  • Dolby Vision

Cons:
  • Motion blur will only be average
  • Poor viewing angles
  • Limited peak brightness makes the TV unusable for HDR use.
  • No Dolby Atmos

LG UN7300 and above
Size Range: 43-75
Size Recommended: All apart from 50" and 58" models.

Pros:
  • Available at smaller sizes
  • No risk of burn in
  • Good viewing angles

Cons:
  • Motion blur will be good for a TV of its size.
  • Limited peak brightness makes the TV unusable for HDR use.
  • No Dolby Atmos
  • No Dolby Vision
  • 3/4 x HDMI 2.0 ports

LG Nano80/85
Size Range: 49-65"
Size Recommended: All

Pros:
  • No risk of burn in
  • Good viewing angles
  • Dolby Atmos (Nano85 only)
  • Dolby Vision
  • 4x HDMI 2.1 ports Nano85

Cons:
  • Motion blur will be very good.
  • Limited peak brightness makes the TV unusable for HDR use.
  • 4 x HDMI 2.0 ports Nano80
 
Last edited:

Dodgexander

Moderator
27/09/2020 - Initial release
28/09/2020 - Added exclusions for 50/58" sizes for LG UN series. Added Atmos FAQ link and LG BX detail.
04/10/2020 - Corrected some mistakes.

Please let me know any feedback on how to improve the guide, anything I have missed or anything you think is a mistake. This guide is not perfect and I am open to suggestions.
 
Last edited:

A20

Novice Member
Great guide - thanks for creating it @Dodgexander The U7QF does support Dolby Atmos. I own the TV and am quite happy with it - I haven't got a console at the moment, so am unsure about motion and HDR - although streaming HDR looks decent on it, despite not being an 1000 nit panel.
 

gandalf72

Standard Member
Thanks for your post and the time you took to do this. Quick question for you hopefully. Reviewing the high-end sets from the recommendation it appears the LG is probably the best set to go for. I am not too clued up about the different versions but see most are going for the CX version. Am I right in thinking that? Is it worth paying a bit more and getting a different model of the CX? If so what would you recommend? Primarily for me, it will be playing the Xbox series x and ps5 and a lot of the time it will be connected to a pc with static web pages. Given that information is the OLED the best choice for me with screen burn issues?
 

Dodgexander

Moderator
Great guide - thanks for creating it @Dodgexander The U7QF does support Dolby Atmos. I own the TV and am quite happy with it - I haven't got a console at the moment, so am unsure about motion and HDR - although streaming HDR looks decent on it, despite not being an 1000 nit panel.
Thanks! I hope it helps people too. Atmos is unfortunately a complicated topic, I chose to dumb it down as best as I can in my recommendations to try and not confuse people.

Yes the U7Q supports Dolby Atmos. In fact, almost every TV you buy now supports Dolby Atmos. However the next gen consoles run HDMI 2.1 ports with eARC support and thus have support when paired with a supported TV to share lossless audio.

To delve in deeper: there are two types of Atmos:

  1. The most common type nowadays is the type included with streaming services like Netflix and Amazon, this type of Atmos data is contained together with a Dolby Digital Plus signal and carries a theoretical maximum bandwidth of 3 Mbits p/s. More commonly with streaming services, this is limited to 768 Kbps p/s to save data.
  2. Then there's the second type. This type is included on physical media like UHD Blu-Rays or games. Instead of using the Dolby Digital+ container for transport, this type uses the improved HD Dolby True HD container. Therefore the bandwidth allowed with this sound is a lot higher (up to 18 Mbits p/s).

So where does this leave us with next gen gaming?
Well we don't really know for sure yet. But if you take past games into consideration then only the second type of Atmos will be supported. This is because games usually only come with one soundtrack and that soundtrack has a choice of either:

1. Dolby Digital Standard + Doby Digital Plus + Atmos
or
2. Dolby Digital Standard + Dolby True HD + Atmos

If games don't include a secondary soundtrack, its likely the trend will continue, and the soundtrack used will be number 2.

Of course nothing is set in stone, and they could easily include multiple soundtracks the same as UHD Blu-Rays and Blu-Rays often do. But it will come down to one of three situations.
  1. The most likely in my opinion is they will choose only a single soundtrack using Dolby True HD as the base. This is because its the highest quality codec, and offers legacy support for non-Atmos equipped soundbars or receivers.
  2. The second most likely is they will choose only a single soundtrack using Dolby Digital Plus as a base. This is less likely because Dolby Digital Plus isn't as high quality as True HD, and thus they will have to drop the quality of the Audio.
  3. The third most likely is they will have dual soundtracks, one with a Dolby Digital Plus track and one with an Atmos track, and allow the game to switch depending on the persons setup. This will require the most work, and thus I think it will be unlikely. Its possibly Microsoft may add some way of toning down the sound for non True HD capable systems, but unlikely.
So for the sake of simplicity, this is why in the guide only TVs that have support for eARC have mention of Atmos.

What makes the matter even more complicated, is some TVs are enabling eARC support despite not having HDMI 2.1 ports, whilst other TVs do not..looking at specs on the outset both kinds of TVs support Atmos, but only the ones with eARC support both types.

And to add to the confusion even more, there will be TVs that include Dolby Atmos support, but only as a DSP (Digital Signal Processing). This means they can apply a 'fake' effect using their own speakers to turn even stereo sound into Atmos. This is completely different, and unrelated.

But the most important thing is not to forget that none of this is important if you are directly connecting your console/PC to the AVR or Soundbar and you are not relying on the TV to send the audio back to your AVR or Soundbar.

None of this is important if you are also using built in sound either, as unless you are buying a high end OLED TV from LG, Panasonic or Philips you are not buying a TV with speakers that can reproduce Atmos. TVs with built in sound that doesn't support Atmos only have Atmos advertised with the TV to send it to an external sound system, and not because they can reproduce the Atmos sound through there speakers. TV speakers will strictly be a stereo signal, even with Atmos sound.

I'll make a permalink to this post in the FAQ, which hopefully explains it to others in the future.
 

Dodgexander

Moderator
Thanks for your post and the time you took to do this. Quick question for you hopefully. Reviewing the high-end sets from the recommendation it appears the LG is probably the best set to go for. I am not too clued up about the different versions but see most are going for the CX version. Am I right in thinking that? Is it worth paying a bit more and getting a different model of the CX? If so what would you recommend? Primarily for me, it will be playing the Xbox series x and ps5 and a lot of the time it will be connected to a pc with static web pages. Given that information is the OLED the best choice for me with screen burn issues?
Regarding screen burn risk, it really depends how you use the TV, and how you have things configured. A bit of web browsing here and there is not going to put you at risk of burn in, and doing things like hiding the windows taskbar when not in use, engaging full screen mode in your browser and using a screensaver in windows will all help alleviate the risk.

If however you don't understand that static images can cause burn in, and you don't take precautionary measures, or say you intend to leave a website like Twitch or Youtube open on a regular basis without the video being full screen, then this is when you are at more risk.

Regarding the difference between each OLED, it goes a bit like this:
BX - This isn't mentioned in the guide because I'm not certain it will work correctly with the new consoles. Once its tested and if it works correctly, it will automatically become the best buy since its the cheapest OLED in their range. All OLEDs use the same panel, so differences between the very cheapest and more expensive are small.

CX - Improves on the BX with a better picture processor that supports Ai upscaling and improved Black Frame Insertion. For now this is the minimum model we know that should support all the next gen gaming features properly. If it turns out the BX works fine after release though, unless you intend to use Black Frame Insertion you are best saving money and going for the BX.

GX - The same as the CX but a slim profile. At this point if you are shopping for TVs GX and above you are placing money-no-object above value.

WX - If for some reason you want to buy a TV with an integrated soundbar instead of your own separate soundbar for Atmos, this is the one to go for. It has improved cable management. Very expensive.

ZX - This is the premium 8k model. Also available at a new 88" size. Ridiculously expensive.

Between the CX and ZX the TVs all have the same picture quality, they all use the same panels. For gaming its likely the BX is going to be just as good as the CX, but we will know closer to the time whether it works okay or not.
 

dawson001

Active Member
Looking to upgrade my TV ready for PS5 but have a limited budget of £1500 for 65 inch. Would you guys choose better HDR performance like that of the Sony Xh9505 or forfeit HDR to have HDMI 2.1 like the Sony XH9005?
 

gandalf72

Standard Member
Regarding screen burn risk, it really depends how you use the TV, and how you have things configured. A bit of web browsing here and there is not going to put you at risk of burn in, and doing things like hiding the windows taskbar when not in use, engaging full screen mode in your browser and using a screensaver in windows will all help alleviate the risk.

If however you don't understand that static images can cause burn in, and you don't take precautionary measures, or say you intend to leave a website like Twitch or Youtube open on a regular basis without the video being full screen, then this is when you are at more risk.

Regarding the difference between each OLED, it goes a bit like this:
BX - This isn't mentioned in the guide because I'm not certain it will work correctly with the new consoles. Once its tested and if it works correctly, it will automatically become the best buy since its the cheapest OLED in their range. All OLEDs use the same panel, so differences between the very cheapest and more expensive are small.

CX - Improves on the BX with a better picture processor that supports Ai upscaling and improved Black Frame Insertion. For now this is the minimum model we know that should support all the next gen gaming features properly. If it turns out the BX works fine after release though, unless you intend to use Black Frame Insertion you are best saving money and going for the BX.

GX - The same as the CX but a slim profile. At this point if you are shopping for TVs GX and above you are placing money-no-object above value.

WX - If for some reason you want to buy a TV with an integrated soundbar instead of your own separate soundbar for Atmos, this is the one to go for. It has improved cable management. Very expensive.

ZX - This is the premium 8k model. Also available at a new 88" size. Ridiculously expensive.

Between the CX and ZX the TVs all have the same picture quality, they all use the same panels. For gaming its likely the BX is going to be just as good as the CX, but we will know closer to the time whether it works okay or not.
Thank you very much for your in-depth response. Yeah, I am kind of swaying between 65 and 55, currently, I have a Samsung hung on the wall and a Panasonic plasma top of the range last flagship model. Planning on losing the plasma and moving the 4k Samsung upstairs and getting new set for living room. Primarily it will be to use as I say as a web browser and then could be console gaming. On average web browsing is the main use very rarely watch tv. I am not putting a price on the next set as it is more important to get the right set than put an incorrect budget but at the same time not looking to spend more than 3k on a set. If I could get 8k it would be immense but don't want to sacrifice gaming experience which is what the main source and use will be either from pc or console use.

Going by your post if I am reading it correctly no real gain in going up to wx or Zx (stupid money). I usually play games for the day at a time but can equally have the browser on for similar time frame just browsing through various tabs.

It will be connected to a Sonos soundbar and couple of play 5's and sub so not really needing the audio element of the tv.
 

Dodgexander

Moderator
Looking to upgrade my TV ready for PS5 but have a limited budget of £1500 for 65 inch. Would you guys choose better HDR performance like that of the Sony Xh9505 or forfeit HDR to have HDMI 2.1 like the Sony XH9005?
Hey mate! I'd personally go for one of the Samsung models and get both. If you are a PS5 user you won't miss Dolby Vision HDR support, and even if it comes to the PS5 you can still enjoy Dolby Vision content using the HDR10 layer. Q90T is most similar to the XH9505.

HDR is the main factor in my opinion, that is why the XH9005 is only in the medium tier.
Thank you very much for your in-depth response. Yeah, I am kind of swaying between 65 and 55, currently, I have a Samsung hung on the wall and a Panasonic plasma top of the range last flagship model. Planning on losing the plasma and moving the 4k Samsung upstairs and getting new set for living room. Primarily it will be to use as I say as a web browser and then could be console gaming. On average web browsing is the main use very rarely watch tv. I am not putting a price on the next set as it is more important to get the right set than put an incorrect budget but at the same time not looking to spend more than 3k on a set. If I could get 8k it would be immense but don't want to sacrifice gaming experience which is what the main source and use will be either from pc or console use.

Going by your post if I am reading it correctly no real gain in going up to wx or Zx (stupid money). I usually play games for the day at a time but can equally have the browser on for similar time frame just browsing through various tabs.

It will be connected to a Sonos soundbar and couple of play 5's and sub so not really needing the audio element of the tv.
Anything more than the CX is stupid money, and if the BX works out okay then even the CX is pushing it. Once you go above the CX its money-no-object kind of territory, and if people are considering spending that much on a TV they also probably plan to spend a lot elsewhere. With limited budgets its much better to buy the cheaper CX (or BX depending on how that works out) and put the rest of the money into sound, or sources.

If the primary use of the display is web browsing I'm not sure OLED is for you though, a lot of the same web content over time is repeated usage of static elements. If you were web browsing from time to time, but mainly watching video full screen on the TV its different, but for a primary monitor you may push your luck with an OLED.
 

dawson001

Active Member
Cheers Dodge. Q90t currently out of my budget but will keep an eye on price. I thought Samsung weren't full 2.1 compliant but must be wrong[/QUOTE
 

Dodgexander

Moderator
Cheers Dodge. Q90t currently out of my budget but will keep an eye on price. I thought Samsung weren't full 2.1 compliant but must be wrong
Current pricing is high. Revisit at Black Friday or later, spring being the best time to buy. Samsung 4k models have a single HDMI 2.1 port and all HDMI 2.1 features are supported.

Of course whether something is supported and whether it will actually work when you first try it is another matter, but I hope the guide already makes it clear that its a bad idea to purchase any of these TVs before the consoles, and probably a bad idea to purchase them either way until things have actually been tested and working fully.
 

gandalf72

Standard Member
Hey mate! I'd personally go for one of the Samsung models and get both. If you are a PS5 user you won't miss Dolby Vision HDR support, and even if it comes to the PS5 you can still enjoy Dolby Vision content using the HDR10 layer. Q90T is most similar to the XH9505.

HDR is the main factor in my opinion, that is why the XH9005 is only in the medium tier.

Anything more than the CX is stupid money, and if the BX works out okay then even the CX is pushing it. Once you go above the CX its money-no-object kind of territory, and if people are considering spending that much on a TV they also probably plan to spend a lot elsewhere. With limited budgets its much better to buy the cheaper CX (or BX depending on how that works out) and put the rest of the money into sound, or sources.

If the primary use of the display is web browsing I'm not sure OLED is for you though, a lot of the same web content over time is repeated usage of static elements. If you were web browsing from time to time, but mainly watching video full screen on the TV its different, but for a primary monitor you may push your luck with an OLED.
Thanks for your reply, if CX is the right option OLED wise but because I will be mainly using it as a pc monitor, what other ones would you say from the high-end Samsung Q95T? or is there an 8k alternate that would get me the great gaming experience that is just about the £3k that would not burn due to my use of web browsing intense use?

Thanks again for your help and hopefully I am not asking anything silly.
 

Dodgexander

Moderator
Thanks for your reply, if CX is the right option OLED wise but because I will be mainly using it as a pc monitor, what other ones would you say from the high-end Samsung Q95T? or is there an 8k alternate that would get me the great gaming experience that is just about the £3k that would not burn due to my use of web browsing intense use?

Thanks again for your help and hopefully I am not asking anything silly.
Just the TVs here in the guide. Samsung have 8k models but they aren't good value compared to the 4k ones and they aren't really any better either.

For example, the Q700T has worse local dimming than the Q80T and the Q800T has worse dimming than the Q90T/Q95T. Only the Q900T/Q950T beats those.

The Q90T and Q95T are the same picture quality, only the Q95T comes with a one connect box. Same is true with the Q900T/Q950T.

Prices currently are high, so I wouldn't judge or compare different models pricing just yet, first time you even want to consider purchasing will be Black Friday, and if you wait even longer than that the more your money will stretch.
 

smdntn

Novice Member
Hi Dodge

Thanks so much for the guide, this is exactly what I was looking for.

I have a question, and I know you say that if a TV isn’t listed then you don’t recommend it. But for my understanding and research, can you explain why Samsung Q70T isn’t listed? Is it because these TVs are edge lit and have no local dimming? Also the response times are lower than the Q80T?

I currently have a Hisense 65N6800 which you recommended a few years back as a good low budget set, but now looking for a serious upgrade with the upcoming Xbox Series X. I think the Samsung is the way to go, just wondered if you could provide some insight re my research.

Thanks
 

Dodgexander

Moderator
I have a question, and I know you say that if a TV isn’t listed then you don’t recommend it. But for my understanding and research, can you explain why Samsung Q70T isn’t listed? Is it because these TVs are edge lit and have no local dimming? Also the response times are lower than the Q80T?
Yes, just because its edge lit without good local dimming, its a much worse compromise compared to say the Sony XH90005 that instead reduces peak brightness.
I currently have a Hisense 65N6800 which you recommended a few years back as a good low budget set, but now looking for a serious upgrade with the upcoming Xbox Series X. I think the Samsung is the way to go, just wondered if you could provide some insight re my research.
That TV is in line in the low end TVs in this guide, so you'll see the biggest gains in quality by looking at high tier TVs than mid tier in this guide.
 

Daveboi7

Novice Member
I don't understand why you included the Hisense U8B? It doesn't have hdmi 2.1 (for VRR I think) which is a huge selling point for next gen.
 

Dodgexander

Moderator
I don't understand why you included the Hisense U8B? It doesn't have hdmi 2.1 (for VRR I think) which is a huge selling point for next gen.
Made a mistake in the OP. It's the new U8Q.

And yes, no HDMI 2.1 support, but its a TV that reach around 1500 nits peak brightness which makes it an excellent TV for HDR. Much better to have a TV like this than a TV that does have HDMI 2.1 with poor HDR performance like the Sony XH9005 or LG Nano85.
 

sp84

Novice Member
Thanks so much for the list @Dodgexander !

I was speaking to you a few weeks ago regarding Ambilight and you explained about spending extra (if possible) and going for a TV with much better HDR performance. As a result I am holding off to buy a new TV until black Friday / possibly later.

My goal is to get one that has good picture quality (& HDR performance) and is (somewhat) next gen gaming ready.

I'm restricted to 49/50 inch sadly, so from what I can gather from the list - the best options seem to be either the Sony XH9505 or the Samsung q80T. The biggest trade off here seems to be no HDMI 2.1 support with the Sony and the fact the q80T doesn't get the highest VRR compared to the other Samsung sets.

I would love to go all in with the LG CX, but both pricing and the fact my little one watches cartoons with static logos, is putting me off.

Just curious out of those 2 TV's - which do you feel is the better balanced (I suppose is the right word) one ... In order to tick the boxes of picture quality, HDR performance and capable with next gen consoles. I have absolutely no idea how important HDMI 2.1 will be - hence the question.

Cheers!
 

Dodgexander

Moderator
Just curious out of those 2 TV's - which do you feel is the better balanced (I suppose is the right word) one ... In order to tick the boxes of picture quality, HDR performance and capable with next gen consoles. I have absolutely no idea how important HDMI 2.1 will be - hence the question.
Sony XH9505 is probably the better TV overall. HDMI 2.1 VRR isn't really great with the 48-60hz range of the 49" Q80T/Q85T and the higher end Samsung Q90T which compares most to the Sony overall is not available at smaller sizes.

Unfortunately you fit into a common demographic when it comes to next gen gaming. Sub 55" options are poor unless you go for the LG CX OLED.

Have you considered purchasing the CX OLED from John Lewis together with their insurance when the price comes down? That would cover you for any potential burn in damage. Channel logos can also be dimmed with LGs logo luminance adjustment. You can also set the TV to the zoom picture mode to avoid the logos altogether.
 

Daveboi7

Novice Member
Made a mistake in the OP. It's the new U8Q.

And yes, no HDMI 2.1 support, but its a TV that reach around 1500 nits peak brightness which makes it an excellent TV for HDR. Much better to have a TV like this than a TV that does have HDMI 2.1 with poor HDR performance like the Sony XH9005 or LG Nano85.
True, however people seem to complain about quality issues and that Hisense doesn't have the best customer service. From reading reviews around amazon and such.

Also have you an opinion on Phillips TV's, specifically PUS8555/PUS9005? I've noticed you don't seem to ever talk about them much and the lack of Phillips TV reviews on this site has me a bit worried about purchasing one.
 

sp84

Novice Member
Sony XH9505 is probably the better TV overall. HDMI 2.1 VRR isn't really great with the 48-60hz range of the 49" Q80T/Q85T and the higher end Samsung Q90T which compares most to the Sony overall is not available at smaller sizes.

Unfortunately you fit into a common demographic when it comes to next gen gaming. Sub 55" options are poor unless you go for the LG CX OLED.

Have you considered purchasing the CX OLED from John Lewis together with their insurance when the price comes down? That would cover you for any potential burn in damage. Channel logos can also be dimmed with LGs logo luminance adjustment. You can also set the TV to the zoom picture mode to avoid the logos altogether.
Thanks so much @Dodgexander ! I never considered using the zoom picture mode (or knew about the logo luminance adjustment) ... Probably like most people the main culprits of potential burn in would be sports scoreboard, gaming HUD and cartoon logos.

On the smaller 49" q80T is it still possible to get [email protected] on those panels?

Like many people I am trying to weigh up how important HDMI 2.1 VRR is going to be - as in will it be a noticeable difference between [email protected] vs [email protected] ... And if any games will actually reach those levels.

This also might sound a bit silly ... I've recently moved into a new house and we bought a TV stand that is 120 cm in length .... Looking at 55 inch TV's - the bezels would obviously spill over the side of the unit. I assume that would look a bit stupid? I was thinking maybe a 55 inch on a VESA stand if I could?

Thanks!
 

The latest video from AVForums

Podcast: Marantz SR7015 & NAD T 778 AVR + Mission LX2 MKII Speaker Reviews, AV & Film News and More

Latest News

Campfire Audio updates Vega and Dorado earphones
  • By Andy Bassett
  • Published
Oppo launches S1 and R1 4K smart TVs
  • By Andy Bassett
  • Published
Lithe Audio AirPlay 2 ceiling speakers world's first
  • By Andy Bassett
  • Published
Humax launches AURA 4K Freeview Play Recorder
  • By Andy Bassett
  • Published
Fyne Audio adds new standmounts to F1 speaker range
  • By Andy Bassett
  • Published
Top Bottom