Question My Arcam avr550 keeps tripping the consumer unit

Discussion in 'AV Receivers & Amplifiers' started by dmartinburns, Aug 25, 2018.

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  1. dmartinburns

    dmartinburns
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    Hi All,
    My avr550 trips the consumer unit circuit when switching on.
    This happens on average once in any seven or so ‘switch ons’.
    Has anyone else had this problem, or has anyone any suggestions for a cure?
    Thanks for reading.
     
  2. ChrisNic

    ChrisNic
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    Have you tried it on a different circuit to rule out a problem with the consumer unit?
     
  3. dmartinburns

    dmartinburns
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    Thanks for the quick reply.
    I don’t know how I would do this as the circuit concerned covers all the downstairs sockets. This problem never occurred with my previous amps. (Arcam avr250 and avr500.
     
  4. ChrisNic

    ChrisNic
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    Take it upstairs?
     
  5. dmartinburns

    dmartinburns
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    Well yes, but to replicate the same conditions, I’d have to take the whole home cinema system up and connect it all up which is not an option.
     
  6. ChrisNic

    ChrisNic
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    Your 1st post suggested the problem occurs when powering on, it sounds unrelated the the rest of the system.

    I believe that amps create a large power draw upon power up so it could be the RCD protecting the circuit is faulty. If the upstairs circuit is on a different RCD than powering it up on that circuit a few times will help confirm what’s at fault.
     
  7. dmartinburns

    dmartinburns
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    Ok. I’ll give this some thought.
    Thanks.
     
  8. Chester

    Chester
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    Extension lead from first available socket on upstairs ring?

    Is the RCD triggered or the MCB for the socket ring? If RCD, I'd recommend getting the AVR checked.
     
  9. dmartinburns

    dmartinburns
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    Thanks Chester. I’m not sure of the difference, despite googling it! It’s the breaker that covers all the downstairs sockets that’s tripping. Arcam have responded and say that I should consider changing my consumer unit for a more up to date one (mine is at least fifteen years old) with a ‘type c curve’, whatever that means!
    What’s odd, at least to me, is that I can use the amp for weeks with no problem. I invariably have the avr550 on standby so I think I’ll try keeping it fully off when not in use and see if that makes any difference.
     
  10. barrywi

    barrywi
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    I had this problem with my Arcam AVR 850, my electrician suggested a different kind of breaker which when fitted solved the problem. It was less sensitive to transient switch on current, never had it on previous Arcam amps.
     
  11. larkone

    larkone
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  12. noiseboy72

    noiseboy72
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    This is not uncommon and is due to the inrush current on switch on. The large capacitors are seen by the trip as virtually short circuit for the first few milliseconds of switch on - which is long enough for the trip to activate if it's a type B designed to trip at about 5x the rated current.

    Type C breakers will trip at a current of about 10x the rated current instantaneously - and over a much longer period for smaller overloads - IE they will not normally trip for 10 minutes or more with a 100% overload - 20A on a 10A breaker as an example. A type C therefore offers slightly less protection than a type B, but are still suitable for domestic use in most circumstances.

    MCBs do age and become more sensitive. You may find that finding one that fits is the tricky part, as the rails and casings change periodically and newer MCBs don't always fit older boxes.

    Get a sparkie to change this out, as there are a few installations where a type C may not be advisable - very long cable lengths between the trip and the sockets is one example. They will be able to asses this and potentially do a cable impedance check to ensure that the voltage drop on the circuit will not reduce the effectiveness of the trip to below a safe level. The danger being that an abnormally high load at the end of the circuit would not trigger a cut out in time.
     
  13. dmartinburns

    dmartinburns
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    That’s very interesting. Thanks noiseboy and to everyone else. Guess I’ll have to get an electrician in.
     

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