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Muddy dialogue from centre speaker

Ruby

Active Member
In the past week I've replaced my amp (Yamaha 1900 replacing an A2) and centre speaker (Kef iQ60c replacing a Q95c). The front and rear speakers in my 5.1 set up are Kef Q55 and 60s respectively. Since I've bought the replacements, I've noticed that the dialogue sounds a bit muddy ie. it doesn't sound loud enough compared to rest of the sound mix, and it lacks depth. I've run the YPAO set up on the amp and have gone through the various DSP options, and none of them have solved the problem. Is this being caused by the fact that my new centre speaker needs to be run in for a longer period?
 

ChrisAV

Active Member
New speakers will benefit from running in (mine recomended 50 hours, so I set my music playing down all the channels instead of stereo for a week to run in my rears and centre).

If the centre doesn't sound loud enough, just increase the level relative to other speakers, this is a common issue.

If after running in, it is still unclear then you could try adjusting the frequencies for the centre channel. I'm not sure which to be honest, but too muddy I would guess maybe boosting mid to high ranges. Also consider your room, where is the speaker placed relative to front speakers and listening position.

Also, are you using a sub?

Chris
 

Ruby

Active Member
I am using a sub and the centre speaker is placed on the floor in front of the TV stand. I know this isn't the ideal position, but it worked well enough when I had my previous centre speaker.
 

ChrisAV

Active Member
I am using a sub and the centre speaker is placed on the floor in front of the TV stand. I know this isn't the ideal position, but it worked well enough when I had my previous centre speaker.

Placing the speaker on floor will cause soundwaves to reflect of the surface, possibly causing your problems. would it be possible to temporarily stand it on on something (small table, pile of magazines or similar) just to see if makes any difference?

Chris
 

Ruby

Active Member
Placing the speaker on floor will cause soundwaves to reflect of the surface, possibly causing your problems. would it be possible to temporarily stand it on on something (small table, pile of magazines or similar) just to see if makes any difference?

Chris

I've temporarily put the centre speaker on a very large book and it seems to have solved the problem. Thanks for your advice.
 

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