1. Join Now

    AVForums.com uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

mp3 Recording vinyl?

Discussion in 'Headphones, Earphones & Portable Music' started by michael smith, Aug 7, 2005.

  1. michael smith

    michael smith
    Guest

    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Ratings:
    +0
    I'm beginning to understand what an mp3 is about, and i'd like to buy one. My question is - Can I record my vinyl classical and operatic records onto it? All the information that I can find out about is how many "songs" I can put onto it. (Which is pretty useless to me) Is there a cable out there that I need to but in order to hook up to my computer from the record player? :lease:
     
  2. shadowritten

    shadowritten
    Guest

    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Ratings:
    +0
    Best advice, Michael, is to either use a search engine like Google (www.google.co.uk) to search for more detailed information on exactly what equipment you'll need to make your vinyl collection into MP3 format, or you can buy the latest edition of What Hi*Fi Magazine's Ultimate MP3 Guide (out in the shops now priced £3.99). There's a useful page in there that will tell you step by step the basics of what you need to know.

    As a classical fan myself, I appreciate your comments about how many 'songs' a player can hold - we both know that a movement, etc, isn't the same as a song. Most MP3 player manufacturers tend to define a song as simply a track which runs for about 3-4 minutes (irrespective of what that track might be - i.e. it could be Faure's Berceuse Op. 16, for example, or it could be something by The Cheeky Girls, heaven forbid!!).

    They usually also stipulate that a 'song' (or more correctly, a track) will be in either WMA (Windows Media Audio) or MP3 format: the former at around 64kbps, the latter at 128kbps. You'll find a lot of helpful information on different bitrates (the kbps part) within this forum and on the Internet - but in short, the higher the number, the better the quality, the bigger the file size and so the fewer 'songs' you can fit onto your player. Again, it'll be different for you and I, because our 'songs' can sometimes last 20 minutes or more! Fans of progressive or conceptual rock doubtless have similar problems.

    Hope this helps.
     
  3. pjskel

    pjskel
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2004
    Messages:
    2,676
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Location:
    UK
    Ratings:
    +124
    Roxio's Toast has a utility called Discus - you'll need to connect your turntable to an RIAA unit, which outputs line level on RCA. This typically is a preamp with phono stage. You'd connect the output into the input of your audio card and use the SW to record the LP. I've not used Discus (and there may be other SW better suited), but I imagine it should allow you to play around with the file removing pops and clicks, and background hiss.
    Take this file, convert it into MP3 using iTunes or other utilities that do the same thing, and viola!
    MP3 file to playback on your chosen MP3 player.
     
  4. michael smith

    michael smith
    Guest

    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Ratings:
    +0
    Thank you, Shadowritten, for your very prompt reply. That Hi-fi magazine sounds just the thing I'm needing. (I'm looking forward to getting my Decca "Ring" cycle on mp3 one of these days soon. Commuting won't be the same)
    And thank you, Pjskel, for your reply. I'm afraid that as I'm not all that up in computers and such like, I really only understood about a third of what you've told me. I'll need to get a friend to translate. But thanks anyway.
    Michael
     

Share This Page

Loading...