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Moving to the US

Discussion in 'TAG McLaren Audio Owners' Forum' started by spiderv6, May 20, 2005.

  1. spiderv6

    spiderv6
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    does anyone have experience of taking European kit to the US? I am going end of this year and my kit comes too.... :)

    I asked the helpdesk and they have quoted me prices to get everything swapped over to US power specs......but what about not doing that and buying a transformer instead.


    Anyone have any experience?
     
  2. TagBeijing

    TagBeijing
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    Lived in LA for a couple of years during the late 90s. Radio Shack is the US version of Tandy's and they stocked small 110v/240v transformers (about the size of a fist). Used these to run a Marantz CD, Pioneer DVD and Audio Innovations integrated amp (60 watts?) (pre my TAG days). They tended to get very hot and burn out after a month or so.

    So, after burning through three or four of these I looked in the Radio Shack catalogue and noticed that they supplied a semi-professional type transformer that cost about US$200 (if memory serves). They ordered it for me which took about a month to deliver. It was a big chunk of metal, weighed a ton, dimensions were about 12"deep, 8"wide and 6"tall.

    Off this I ran a multiplug board and had no further problems.

    Moral - if you decide to go the transformer route get a semi-pro/pro beast especially as the 100x5 will chew up a lot more power than my little Audio Innovations integ amp (which was a nice little amp and served me very well in my #2 set up once the TAG kit moved in).

    Hope this helps.
     
  3. Kevinc

    Kevinc
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    I moved permanently to the US in 98 and brought my (then) Audiolab 8000CDM and 8000 DAC with me. As it was a permanent move I had TAG convert them both for me at the time - the charge was about GBP50 each or something. For what it is worth I also had Musical Fidelity convert my pre and power amps on similar terms. I brought a bunch of other bits and pieces with my like FAX machines and even a Dualit toaster and the relocation service my employer used gave me a list of stores that supplied good quality step-up voltage transformers. I had/have a 1500W one that cost around $175 that I used the Dualit through with no problems and several 300W/100W ones that were around $20-25. Good ones DON'T say "do not leave plugged in continuously" on them! I used a place called Appliances Overseas (see www.appliancesoverseas.com ) which sold good ones of all sizes: they're not the same makes as the current ones and the price has come down thanks to China but they look very similar - I'd call them and ask if they're rated to be left on continuously before buying. I used a 230V Arcam CD player in my vacation home bedroom system for a bit through a 100W one with no audible problems. Since then of course I've been through several upgrades and my current DVD32FLR/AV32R was bought in native 115V. Again for what it's worth, I shipped the Musical Fidelity amps back to a relative in the UK via MF who converted them back to 230V and they're still going strong!

    I would say if the move is permanent then get them converted - I can't say it makes any audible difference but you'll have peace of mind and you won't worry about leaving big transformers on all the time. If the move is temporary then I'd use transformers and just make sure you buy a big enough one for any amps!
     
  4. roversd1

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    Check your US home for a 240V mains supply as many homes have this for dryers and washing machines.
     
  5. btb20

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    I think that US 240V may be multiphase.
     
  6. Kevinc

    Kevinc
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    As I understand it, the US 240V outlets in my current house which power an electric oven and electric clothes dryer have both terminals (ie the non-earthed [or "grounded"] terminals) live at 120V peak and out of phase, effectively giving peak to peak of 2x120V = 240VAC. I have seen this described as "single-phase", but that's all I know about it - you'd have to talk to your local electrical utility company and a licensed electrician. I never needed to investigate using this because my previous residences didn't have it where I could think of plugging my toaster in and my Audiolab kit had been converted, and now I only have US voltage kit (including my Dualit toaster - I had Dualit send me replacement 120V elements which sorted that one!). Note that even if the 240V supply is OK to use, under the US Codes 240V outlets must be on dedicated (only one outlet) circuits, and depending on your local Code installation of a new outlet would likely require you to buy a Permit from and have it inspected by the City, as a result of which I thoroughly recomend using a licensed contractor to take responsibility even if you are experienced. Based on the recent quote I had to install a dedicated supply for my system I would be pretty confident that unless you can use the existing 240V outlet in the laundry room the cost of installation would be a lot more than getting your TAG kit voltage converted. You might also want to have a look at http://quick220.com/ for a transformer alternative that uses the same principle (but someone more qualified than I would have to comment on its use here).
     
  7. caleb

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    Just a thought - would something like a PS AUDIO power regenerator help here?

    As it converts the input to 12 volts and then back to mains again at your required voltage wouldn't this do the trick?
     
  8. JohnDee68

    JohnDee68
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